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1

I would bet the liquid was most likely absorbed by the carpet and/or underlayment (or sound deadener ... whatever you want to consider it). Some may have gone out the holes as you are thinking, but I think I'd be testing the carpet in this area to see if it feels wet or sticky. If so, use a carpet cleaning machine on these areas to get the residue out. I ...


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I assume your crosswind has an automatic transmission. First to check is if you are using the correct ATF. A wrong ATF can make a big difference. It is not just about the appearance (clear, etc). I suggest that you check the vehicle manual for the right ATF. It's a start. And I wouldn't attempt to "adjust" things unless I know what I'm doing. I ...


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For 1) if you slowly release the brakes then they can "drag" on the disks for longer and as the disks start to rotate, either through grade or suspension load, then you hear the sound caused by friction. For 2) as you select reverse, then the drive train, being an automatic is being loaded into turning the opposite direction which will absorb all ...


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You may have a worn mount, suspension, or steering problem. They create a knocking noise when taking the foot off the accelerator pedal.


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Some transmissions, notably Chryslers, have the computer control everything including the harshness of the shifts. You don't need to re-program, just clear the learned values and it will re-learn the shift pattern. My GMC truck takes a few miles and then it seems to learn it. I understand Mopars might take longer. Your best bet is to talk to whomever re-...


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Replace the filter. Be very careful with the O-ring around the pickup tube. If you are sucking in air, you will not be moving. A lot of transmission shops refuse to even open the pan because the liability, insist that they change the filters and the seal. When you are under there, you can visually inspect the pan. If nothing is in the pan, the ...


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