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If the engine isn't running, there'll be no pressure in the hydraulic circuits within the transmission, so the clutches or band brakes within the transmission won't be engaged, and the transmission can likely freewheel just as if it were in neutral for a limited distance with no damage - since there's no lubricant flow to the bearings you don't want to go ...


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The TCC is the Torque Converter Clutch, which is controlled by a solenoid operated valve. If the solenoid fails and gets stuck open it leads to the symptoms you describe, called torque converter lockup. Replace the TCC solenoid and your problems are likely solved.


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I and several of my friends have been towing Forrester stick shift 4 down for years. My 2006 has about 70,000 miles of being towed 4 down with no problems. A dealer told me today that Forrester 2016 and on can not be towed 4 down so Subaru for the RV community is history. They will be loosing a lot of sales as in the past they have been a popular tow ...


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I just did this job today on a 2005 Nissan Pulsar (Australia) Dropped the pan, dropped out the screen, was smart enough to do a diagram of the bolt sizes for each hole, but what hey!!!!!!! Why won’t this last filter screen bolt tighten up!!!!!! Now I’ve found this post explaining that it’s an ongoing problem, I figure it’s one bolt holding the screen To ...


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I'm going to suggest you may have a vacuum leak of some sort. That would be between the throttle body and where the air enters the engine at the heads. This could be in the intake manifold or at any of the gaskets which hold intake manifold and accessories to the engine. Your description of it running a little high when in P/N and it dropping really low, ...


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You are absolutely correct in park or neutral your converter has no resistance therefore you will rely on the engine to heat up the coolant. Putting it in drive even at idle will heat the vehicle faster in a Mazda 3 or a huge Cat front end loader because the transmission cooler is stacked to the radiator. The heater will provide heat 10 times as fast!!


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You can think of a torque converter as a essentially straight shaft under most circumstances meaning that it holds both sides at the same speed. It's only when the car is moving slowly or stopped that the converter "decouples" input from output to prevent the engine from stalling and to allow a smoother start and stop. Most torque converters today are "...


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