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The most common cause of radio interference is arcing. This may be a bad bulb or bad wiring or a bad connector/connection. Rear defrost grids are notorious for this. Unfortunately, this will be a long a drawn out diagnosis. This involves a process of elimination to see where the arcing is located. First, look for any lights that seem dimmer than the others....


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You obviously have a problem with the rear brake at this point and you should NOT drive it in this condition as you could cause additional damage or even cause a fire. I suspect you didn't get the brake shoes installed or adjusted properly or the actuating cylinder is sticking. Either way now you have probably cooked the brake fluid and will need to ...


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The front brake calipers are very simple devices. The fluid goes into one hole (the brake hose attachment) and goes out one of two other holes (the piston bore or the bleeder hole). If the caliper is not bleeding and the input seems fine, check the bleeder hole. If you have the brakes assembled (i.e. brake hoses connected), do the following: Unscrew the ...


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I'm really not sure if I'm allowed to give an update on an oldish thread, but I'll see if I can get away with it. The new ABS pump worked great for a while. However, the brakes slowly started to get soft again to a point where they was back to it's original state. I then had to slam on for a deer, causing them to go back to how they was. I'm just seriously ...


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Reverse bleeder pumps brake fluid from the caliper bleed screw back to the master cylinder. This type is hard to use because Master Cylinders do not have bleed screws to connect to. Vacuum pump is the opposite, it sucks brake fluid from the Master Cylinder when connected to the brake bleeder on the caliper. Note: some vacuum pumps on the market can create ...


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I went on and had the service done in a local shop. While paying, I asked the mechanic, and he looked it up on his computer. Apparently, the (at least the Limited Edition) Foresters come installed with ceramic pads.


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In general the e-brake engages the rear brakes which are in general weaker than the front brakes and are quite likely drum brakes on your 2000 Ford Ranger. The smell was the stench of your rear brakes roasting. It's possible that you have completely worn out your rear brakes or just enough that a simple adjustment is needed. If you've boiled your brake ...


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NYS Inspection minimum requirements are 1/16 of an inch (1.6mm), and 1/32 (0.8mm) over a rivet head. Keep in mind those are minimums. For typical use, a 12mm pad lasts about 50k miles. So if the pad is at 2mm, expect that it will be out of inspection in 4k miles. Personally, if I am in working, and find the pads less than 4mm, I will replace them. It's ...


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According to this website, you should consider changing your pads between 3.2-6.4mm of thickness. If the pad is below 3.2mm, it's pretty much a must.


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Does the caliper have excessive movement? Are all mounting points tightened up accordingly for the load? If you can feel vibration through the pedal, the contact surface of the pads and rotors might not be sufficient enough. A run out test is recommended, If runout is beyond manufacturers' suggested max then you will need to replace both rotors And the pads ...


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You don't mention having the rotors turned when you replaced the pads. Even if you can't see or feel them, there will be some groves in the rotor. This can conceivably cause the sound. Assuming the rotors were not turned, you should re-do the brake job. Get the rotors turned AND use new brake pads. Alternately, if you did not use the lubricate between ...


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Gotta love ABS. With ABS the bleeding sequence can be very different than without. The accumulator is a tricky little gizmo that modulates the brake pressure. On some makes if the accumulator is not relieved before opening the system, you just bought a new accumulator.


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All these issues will be due to moisture and rust. If the semi-metallic pads are frozen to the rotors, this can be corrected with some brute force. If water has contaminated the brake fluid, this can cause caliper pistons to seize in the calipers. This may be to poor maintenance or torn dust boots on the caliper pistons. If pads are worn down too far, ...


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In order to diagnose this I have had to raise the driven wheels off the ground, disengage the traction control, and put the transmission in drive, then observe what is happening. Of course, you have to take the necessary precautions to make sure the car cannot come off the supports or roll in any way; you must have level ground and the remaining wheels ...


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