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I can attest to this possibility as it happened on my car and I did my own repairs so I know that caused same in my vehicle. If you don't know disc brakes work by a rotor attached to your wheel/tire and a set of two pads, one on each side of the rotor, that are clamped and squeezed when you press your foot brake pedal. Though hugely rare it is possible ...


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For such scenarios, best is to hammer on nut but parllal to line using blunt piece of metal. I use a cut piece of L-key. This being the most effective. If you use grip plier, probably the line will have to be cut, put a new nut and then get flared the end by some professional.


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As soon as I replaced the rear, the pedal would get hard during bleeding, but as soon as I started the truck the pedal falls to the floor no matter how many bleeds I perform. This happens because of power brakes. The pedal is hard when there is no power assist. When you start the engine, the power assist starts. Then the pedal will become more "...


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Simple geometry - when the wheel is locked (by brakes), it will apply the force to the trailing arm (in most suspensions) compressing the spring. Think of it as a lever.


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It depends on the rear suspension of the vehicle as to whether it will "dip" or not under the circumstances you're talking about. The type of rear suspension I'd suspect you are describing is a cantilever design, where there is a forward pivot point at the body, then the two hub ends project towards the back of the car. This forms a large "U&...


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There are many reasons: Car brakes are much larger in proportion to the fully-laden car as truck brakes are to the fully-laden truck. There is very little risk of brake overheat and brake fade in a car. An over-speeding car is easy to slow down when going downhill. An over-speeding truck is much more difficult. The cost of running a truck is of high ...


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Well, the extra weight and cost of the equipment are two points, small in comparison to the weight of the trucks. The accountants (bean counters) for the car manufacturers are always trying to keep car manufacturing costs to a minimum as saving a penny on 50,000 cars makes a difference. Not only that, the brake shoes and pads are much more expensive on ...


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The temperatures between the two sides should be similar. If one side is significantly hotter than the other (that seems to be what you're saying) then there is definitely a problem with one side or the other. It could be that the "cold" side it not working properly and so the braking load all fell on the other side. (Keep in mind that even ...


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Rotors ( and drums) can be resurfaced as long as more than the specified minimum thickness remains. Minimum thickness may be marked on rotors or you need to look it up. I would also look for a new garage.


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No, they do not. They depend mostly on SPEED and WEIGHT. The faster and heavier your car is, the bigger the energy your brakes are gonna have to dissipate in heat form. Just put the numbers on this little known formula: e=m*c² and you will find how much energy your system will have to dissipate. Tires matters, bigger diameter disks helps, because of the ...


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