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From personal experience: I've replaced front calipers, keeping the rears, and vice versa, depending on which ones were bad. As long as they get replaced in pairs I would not worry about whether they are different brands at all.


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If you really can’t find the original make then you should at least have a pair of the same make of caliper at the front, even if they are a different make to the rear. Do make sure that the pipe fittings match - experience has shown that there can be minor differences that are sufficient to cause problems and you do not want sudden problems with brakes. And ...


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Well I'll be god dang! I am over the moon right now y'all. Y'all aint gown believe this but I done took a second look at that there right front rotor area and found this lil sucker right up in there: I just cant believe I actually had this dun diagnosed in my own head to the T!!!! It WAS a dang leaf! I knowed it! I hope this helps someone else who gets ...


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Is there's no foreign object debris in the wheel then a noise from a front wheel comes from a limited set of sources in a rear wheel drive car/van: Wheel bearing: Not all wheel bearing failures sound the same Suspension: you can get squeaks and rattles under movement if there's a bad suspension component Brake system: a loose caliper, failed caliper, seized ...


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Do a preliminary check of the hydraulics and vacuum booster by holding down the brake pedal and feel if there is continuous release of pressure. Pulse the brake pedal repeatedly and continue pulsing while your turn off the engine. The pedal should get harder and harder to push and eventually settle to a consistent pressure on your foot with no 'lag' and ...


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If the dealer has measured them, even though most of the corrosion has now gone, they may be too thin and need replacing. Given rotors are cheaper than the consequences of brakes failing, I would put the news ones on. And have just done so on all 4 corners of my car.


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Check the motor mounts. If the motor was at high revs letting off the throttle and hitting the brakes hard could have made the motor shift. Since the motor moves independent of the body and the shift lever is mounted to the body,the motor can move enough to pull the shift actuator out of Drive.


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You need to check the suspension joints as a failed bush can allow for the movement you describe. Inspect the tire tread as a failed bush can cause rapid tire wear on the inside or outside edges. I have just replaced all of the rear suspension on my car as one bush had failed after 15 years - logic being the others were likely to fail soon. Result is a car ...


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Seems like a bearing is bad causing too much play. Have a good reviewed mechanic do a diagnosis, doing it yourself will be a hassle.


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Most likely you just need to pump the brakes several times to get the fluid back into the calipers. More than likely, there is wear on your brake pads, which means when you compressed your caliper, there is now a gap between the pads and the rotor. If you pump the pedal several times the caliper will refill with fluid and take up that space. The more the ...


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Bleed the brake lines, specifically in the caliper you compressed. I'm unsure of the exact mechanics of it, but I would wager that compressing the piston could displace the fluid out of the caliper somewhere else. Air/lack of fluid in the lines or caliper would be my guess.


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