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Classic automatic transmission (torque converter) is not just different from mechanical gearbox, it's entirely different concept. While gearbox is gears connecting 2 shafts and being lubricated by oil, torque converter is oil. Literally, the energy from engine to wheels flows through oil, oil that's energized by the impeller and working against turbine. ...


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Because they are very different. A manual transmission is basically just a bunch of gears, shims, shafts, and synchronizers bathed in oil that gets swung around by the gears sitting in the oil. An automatic transmission is hydraulically controlled and is full of valves, tiny passages, gears, clutch packs and many other things. For any of these to work they ...


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The shafts and cogs in an automatic may be placed above the sitting transmission oil level or obstructed from splash lubrication by shield, guards, electronics, any other equipment and thus depend on pressure from oil orifices pumped by the torque converter. Note also that some 'Automatic trigger manual' like Honda high RPM, motorcycle style hydraulic ...


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There was air in the line; the shop bled everything and the clutch pedal feels as it did when the car was new. Not sure why they didn't do this when they replaced the clutch...


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Sounds like it'd be your master cylinder leaking through the piston. You're okay to drive whatever short distance, make sure you clean up the fluid that leaked inside like @Paulster said. In theory, you only need the clutch to start from a complete stop, if you're pretty good at driving a manual, you can minimize the use of clutch on this trip matching revs.


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Yes, but there are some caveats: If you are continually leaking brake fluid into the interior of the car, it will eat the paint on the floor pan, making it prone to rusting in the future. Since you are leaking into the interior, this will collect on the padding and will most likely not come out, which will make it far worse for the condition noted in the ...


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It sounds like possibly a worn out clutch. On vehicles with with self-adjusting hydraulic mechanisms (which I think the 2000 Civic has) as the clutch wears out the mechanism will 'tighten up' so that there is less travel as you press the pedal, up to a point where the clutch does not fully disengage and would exhibit the symptoms that you have mentioned. ...


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