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Well I'll be god dang! I am over the moon right now y'all. Y'all aint gown believe this but I done took a second look at that there right front rotor area and found this lil sucker right up in there: I just cant believe I actually had this dun diagnosed in my own head to the T!!!! It WAS a dang leaf! I knowed it! I hope this helps someone else who gets ...


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Is there's no foreign object debris in the wheel then a noise from a front wheel comes from a limited set of sources in a rear wheel drive car/van: Wheel bearing: Not all wheel bearing failures sound the same Suspension: you can get squeaks and rattles under movement if there's a bad suspension component Brake system: a loose caliper, failed caliper, seized ...


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Looks like the green eye is leaking a tiny amount of electrolyte and the liquid layer on the battery collects dust. (Those green indicators are almost pointless, but they probably sell the batteries better.) The leak is minor and probably won't affect the battery performance. It is, however, probably enough to cause accelerated corrosion of the battery ...


11

It looks to me as the battery has been boiled, meaning the alternator overcharged it. This has several implications: If the alternator overcharged it, then it will do so again. If this is the case, you need to have the alternator tested to ensure the internal regulator is fully functioning. Overcharging is as bad (or worse) than undercharging. You can do a ...


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All looks very dry. Remove, clean and put some grease or petroleum jelly on the terminals. Otherwise looks very dusty.


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The service schedule is defined by the engineers so that the oil does what it is meant to. If you don’t change it and do another 100k then there may be damage or a failure. But if you do change it, then it is part of preventive maintenance which reduces the liklihood of problems - never gets to zero though. So, it’s down to you - do you look after it or not. ...


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Two things you can do (which I can think of) to eliminate the transmission as the culprit: When you pull the dipstick, if you smell the transmission fluid and it doesn't smell burnt (there's a DISTINCT difference when it is burnt) and is a nice cherry color as you've already stated, it should be in good shape. On the radiator, there are two small hard lines ...


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The part you have circled in the first image is the Vapor Canister Purge Valve / Solenoid: I found it here on RockAuto.com (NOTE: I have no affiliation with RockAuto, just showing the information). This is an emissions part, but is separate from the EGR. It should be plumbed from the fuel tank (or charcoal canister) to the intake manifold.


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For example, I see "head cylinder temp" and it says 422 for one of 'em ... and 190 for the other one (I'm assuming there are two because there are two different readings... in farenheight I suppose)... and that gets me worried. That seems awful high. So, just taking this one example of yours, we will need to know exactly where the two sensors are ...


2

So I'll start by answering your question listed at the end. First off, while there is a small level of standardization amongst OBD2 reported codes, there isn't standardization as to what sets these codes. This information, generally know as the code setting criteria, is written by the manufacturer of the unit - say the engine. This criteria will differ as ...


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The typical 50:50 glycol mix under normal operating pressure can be over 200F. That would feel very hot. Typically 120 F is the hottest water a person can stand for more than several seconds. Get an infra-red thermometer , great for a wide range of temperatures without contact. Helpful for making fudge. I drove my 3.5 L Murano about 12 miles on interstate ...


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That looks like the clamp or safety clamp for the spare wheel carrier. You might find it useful to search for an owners manual for the car online or second-hand as that will help you with many things you don't yet know about the car. This video shows how to use it - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ywj5W_YhHUk


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I would use a pry-bar to get that out, sometimes using a spacer can help change the working angle fortuitously. I have used a small puller to get them out - a block with a bolt and a "hook" into the plug can also work.


1

Yes, you could easily have a large leak. The most likely place is Corrosion on the condenser (next to your coolant radiator at the front of the car). I would have thought that you should be able to hear the gas escaping if you get your ear close to the condenser.


7

If this is only affecting one front wheel there is something seriously wrong somewhere. I would expect a tracking problem to affect both tires. Possibly you have bent one of the links in the steering mechanism, or something is worn or broken in the suspension on that side of the car, so the wheel is "pointing in the wrong direction" or its camber is wrong ...


1

Dexcool is a GM product, and it comes out orange. Ford came out with an orange coolant (Motorcraft Orange) which is similar to Dexcool, and probably interchangeable, but there's no consensus. It's hard to say which was used from the color. But, it wasn't right anyway. This chart shows which coolant to use for most Ford vehicles depending on the model year, ...


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Just removing a gear will not change the torque rating. It will change how the engine power is delivered to the road. The rating is based on the strength of the case, the design of the teeth etc. If you exceed the torque limit then gears can be stripped or cases split or burst so when tuning engines that gearbox torque limit should be checked.


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A late answer but it might help someone else: Everything seems to be design engineered for easy assembly at the auto plants. The converter arrives at the plant with studs attached and tack welded, so that it survived that journey. The stud is splined where it goes into the converter so it doesn't spin and would be a one hand install at the plant. For you ...


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