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If you are not confident yet in using a clutch, it may be beneficial for you to ride with a friend or family member that you trust and has excellent driving skills and carefully observe how they manipulate clutching. Riding through town up and down hills and braking should be paid special attention to.


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Most manual petrol cars don't really have sufficient torque at idle to move on clutch alone, and what you describe sounds about normal for a car that's about to stall (if the clutch were raised further without applying more throttle). Some can creep on the clutch alone but it's a fine line to walk - and you won't move particularly fast. While it has worked ...


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Yes, I believe you have correctly diagnosed the problem. You should address this as soon as possible as the pump may seize up at any time. The squeal is your warning signal. If it seizes then you'll lose coolant flow and also likely lose other things on the same drive belt like alternator, power steering, and A/C.


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The issue turned out to be water accumulating under the passenger side floorboard. On this model of car, the sunroof is designed in a foolish way - when it rains, water can get into the car. Why Volvo engineers decided to not simply seal it is beyond me - maybe so that the car is ruined faster and people buy more cars? But in any case, their solution is to ...


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I used to work in automotive assembly plant trouble shooting problems, including squeaks and rattles. This one is wack. This sounds like a taillamp creak. The taillamp lens is made from acrylic. If the edge of the lamp is in slight contact with painted sheet metal and there is even the slightest movement of sheet metal you will hear an obnoxious creak ...


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Check the rear stabilizer links. They are located between the lower control arm and the anti sway bar. They should look something like this: or this: They can have ball and socket joints or rubber bushings. If the joints or bushing wear out, you'll get thumping or squeaking. They are hard to diagnose because they are under a lot of compression when the car ...


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Sounds like sucking air because of a low oil level. That is consistent with it going away when oil is added , and coming back when oil leaks out.


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If (as per your comments) you're looking to deaden road noise as opposed to engine noise then you aren't going to see much improvement from installing/up grading the under-bonnet sound insulation. The sound deadening under the carpet and inside the doors is more the area you want to look at - however there's a great deal of effort involved there in taking ...


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Older vintage Silverados had a known issue with piston slap. It is worse in the winter but is always present even in warmer weather. The forums have been saying for well over a decade it has to do with the sizing of the aluminum pistons. Way back when things were built to tighter standards, cylinder bores were matched with piston sizes. While all the parts ...


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More than likely the lifters are getting worn out. When this happens, they lose the oil in the body while sitting for a long time, then there's lots of excess valvetrain noise. Once the oil pressure is completely up and has completely filled the lifters, the noise will abate. Replacing the lifters in the engine should completely cure the issue (if this is ...


4

I'm new here, but there's a thing called piston slap. This is when the piston skirt gets worn and starts to hit the sides of the cylinder wall. It happens on older vehicles with high milage. If this is what it is there's not much you can do about it except to just ignore it. Other possibilities are low engine oil level, low oil pressure, worn valve train.....


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