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A quick net search suggest fatigue or high temperature/melting. All the bearings would need to be examined with magnification to do a real analysis. Part of the problem is that is a severe failure; the original failure may induce other types of failures. Apparently those are babbitt rather than the typical trimetal because no bronze is showing. Babbitt loses ...


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The most common causes are unbalanced tires, a bad front wheel bearing, or failing brake pads that can cause your vehicle's noises.


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It's likely the struts, springs and some related parts (strut bearings, mounting plates, coil spring protectors). See the reply in this post from "444rose" at the top.


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You have determined that the noise is directly related to the car's speed, so it must be tires and/or wheels and/or CV joints and/or wheel bearings. Something (or several somethings) is worn or damaged. You'll need to have a capable mechanic examine the car. Perhaps or more of the tires are damaged or defective (remember that even new tires are sometimes ...


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In the video the transmission is in Drive. Downshift one gear lower and repeat the experiment. If the sound now starts well below 45, gets very loud well below 60, intense well below 70 and disappears well below 80, then the sound is related to engine speed, not road speed. In that case, it's not a suspension issue, it's an engine or drivetrain issue. To me ...


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I see 3 major possibilities: Something stowed in the back of the car came loose when you hit a bump and was rattling around for awhile. It then found its way somewhere where it can't rattle anymore so you don't hear it A door or window mechanism came loose, you can determine this by testing the windows, handles and locks of all your doors. If something ...


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Have it checked. A broken part could have finally fallen off. Unless you know what was there before you won’t know it is missing.


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