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it seems to make sense that draining the oil cold after all the heavier particles settled in the bottom is the way to go. Modern syntethic multi viscosity oils have no problem with slow flow rate when draining out without warming up the engine. This is also a safer approach.


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Check the starter motor is it well attached to the bell housing i once experienced the same problem but on a Mercedes Benz and later found out i had loose starter bolts. If it bolted nice and tight then the problem might be within the starter motor maybe a faulty starter solenoid . Then check all the wiring harness


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NOTE: You state "piston bearings" ... which don't exist. I'm assuming you actually mean either the rod or main bearings which the crankshaft rides on, so that's what I'm going with. Technically I suppose you could ... but why? It doesn't make sense for many reasons: When you get new bearings, they come as a set for all of the journals. You've got ...


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Connecting rod may have broken. Checking if any symptoms like oil leaks, crank noise in engaged gear might ascertain cause


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I am trying to understand if or why electrical and hybrid cars always have automatic transmissions. As an answer pointed out, this is not always true. However, let me tell you more about the Toyota hybrids. In Toyota hybrids, the hybrid system IS the transmission. The hybrid system is a clever way of implementing an electric continuously variable ...


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Note on the question itself... Not all hybrids have automatic transmission. The first generation Honda Insight, Honda Civic Hybrid, and Honda CR-Z were available with manual transmissions. For an interesting video tour of a Gen 1 Insight see: This Honda Gets 61 Miles Per Gallon.


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I can relate a story from my own experience with my daughter's car. Turns out it had two bad ignition coils that caused the engine to misfire when it was raining. Did she stop when the check engine light came on? Nope! So the unburned fuel from the misfiring cylinders ends up in the catalytic converter. These things are designed to handle mostly burned ...


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An Engine Oil is technically called as the "Blood of the Engine" Engine Oil has two primary tasks to do in every engine. To cool the engine. To reduce the friction between the components of the engine. Thereby enhancing the the life of the engine components and thereby reducing the wear and tear in each and every components of engine. Coming to ...


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My bet is, your battery is too dead to run the engine, which could be caused from a bad alternator. You can check the voltage at the battery using a digital multimeter (DMM). It should be around 12.5vdc or better. If it is less than this, try charging it and seeing if that allows you to start and run the engine. If it doesn't take a charge, then you'll need ...


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Depending on the mileage on these plugs, I'd suggest there's absolutely nothing wrong with the way your engine is running. These plugs look to be in great shape. The small amount of deposits on the sides of some of the plugs wouldn't worry me at all. (NOTE: There is a decent chart on reading spark plugs I posted in this answer which may be useful to you.) ...


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Pump it out. You can get electric or hand pumps, ones that are already built into a tank or ones that are just an inlet and outlet hose. It wont get all of the sludge out but it will get more oil out than draining from the sump plug will. It is time consuming at best so I've only done it a hand full of times (twice on a car with a rounded off sump plug and ...


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Yes, a bit of water in your coolant shouldn't do any harm. However, A vehicle should not be consuming coolant. So if the coolant level goes down (assuming you do your level checks when the engine is at the same temperature each time (either hot or cold, as the coolant level will change somewhat depending on the temperature of your engine), then you DO have ...


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Yes, that should be fine. I would make sure that the ratio of antifreeze / anticorrosion is correct fairly soon and definitely before winter just in case. If this is the only time you have done that then it won't hurt. But don't make a habit of it - some engines need the benefits of specific coolant concentrations.


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If you mean freeze plugs; Their only function is to remove sand from the core at the foundry. The name "freeze plugs" is just great PR. I had them push out on 2 cars. What caused it is build up of rust sludge in low spots in the iron blocks. I used a hose to clean out as much rust as possible , pushed in new plugs and everything was fine once I stopped rust ...


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