8

It's just an indicator. All vehicles have some amount of blow-by. Since the vehicle you were looking at is probably a brand new car with very few miles on it, it might be the engine is not completely broken in yet, which might allow for more blow-by. There are a lot of reasons why this may be happening. It might be something in the design and continue to ...


4

The pulsing should not be a huge issue. Remember that your 4-cyl engine will not have a constant vacuum associated with it as it is only drawing it twice per revolution of the crankshaft, which means you'll get vacuum pulses. Vehicles with more cylinders will have a more constant vacuum draw, but will still have vacuum pulses ... they'll just be less ...


4

What I see missing here is the fact that the PCV system does far more than just retain EPA compliance, the blow-by contains dozens of damaging compounds that must be removed as soon as they enter the crankcase by fresh air entering one bank, and the foul nasty vapors evacuated or "sucked" out the opposite bank while still in a gaseous state. If you do NOT ...


3

That is a PVC valve hose assembly. They are inexpensive (less than $10 in my area) and fairly straight forward to replace. This connects the PCV valve to the manifold (the connector you pointed out) and also continues back to a vacuum manifold behind the engine. Had to replace this on my daughter's car that has the same engine. The connectors were dried ...


3

Yes, you could use any fuel and oil resistant hose. They are typically made of silicone, polyurethane or rubber. This will ensure longevity of the replaced hose. Have a look at silicone automotive hoses. One thing to consider is, on many modern systems the hoses are molded to a particular shape to clear surrounding components in the bay. If this is the case,...


3

It certainly looks cracked. You could try spraying some EGR cleaner at the crack while the engine is idling. If the EGR cleaner gets sucked in through the cracked pipe, the revs of the engine will change, which will confirm you have an air leak.


3

I think everyone is missing the point of the catch can in the first place. The catch can sole purpose it to keep oil from going into your intake and being burn, which is BAD for the environment. You would put the catch can INLINE with the PVC return line to the Intake. When installed this way (the proper way), it is still recirculating the fumes, but ...


2

As you are aware, since you tagged your question with it, most (if not all) modern engines have positive crankcase ventilation, which under normal conditions, maintains a lower pressure inside the crankcase relative to the atmosphere. If anything, you should feel a slight suction when you remove the oil filler cap. If you feel pressure instead, the first ...


2

I'd also wonder if this rather traditional/old fashioned test is entirely applicable to newer vehicles. There's a lot of changes that have happened in the cylinder head (where the oil filler is usually, though not always located) down the decades which might make noticeable air movement more likely than it used to be... depending how old the advice is, that ...


2

For such a cheap part, if you suspect the vacuum hoses then just replace it to remove it from the list of possible causes. From my knowledge the MJ tritons were still carburettor. If this is the case then perhaps it might be worth trying to diagnose a possible carburettor issue. If it performs this behaviour at any particular throttle position then it might ...


2

I'm not sure that the valve you have pictured is the PCV valve. A PCV valve traditionally is a connection between the intake manifold and the crank case. The line pictured, from the crank case to the air filter, is most likely a fresh air intake or breather line. But i think your on the right track to look for the PCV valve. A poorly working PCV system can ...


2

The part you use should withstand high temperatures and must not collapse under vacuum. I think if you use garden hose, it will just collapse and also melt down. The only hands on experience I have is changing the PCV hose with a silicone one in a jaguar s-type v6 3.0. It worked fine there, but that doesnt mean that you will have similar results. You can ...


2

The Haynes manual is correct you need to remove the intake to access the PCV valve. The hose from the valve cover to the intake tube is a breather hose. The valve in question.


1

According to Wikipedia, the BL O-Series 1.7L was used in: Leyland Sherpa/Freight Rover Sherpa/200/300 1.7 L, 2.0 l Princess / Austin Ambassador 1.7 L, 2.0 L Morris Ital 1.7 L, 2.0 L automatic Morris Marina 1.7 L In case that helps in your search.


1

With respect to measuring the health of the PCV system there appears to be a special vacuum gauge in a small pressure range capable of measuring the subtle vacuums expected in the crankcase. There's a youtube video demonstrating the unit in operation. The diagnostic part is Volvo P/N 9997226 and there's an associated article detailing the acceptable ranges......


1

There are two ways I can think of to "fix" this without replacing the valve cover: Use a piece of thin rubber, or build up some teflon tape around the threads. The idea here is to just seal the threads so you are sucking out the bad gasses from the crankcase and not just pulling air from past the threads. It won't actually fix the bad threads, but it ...


1

Sound to me like I would want to rule out a cylinder head gasket, or possibly a cylinder head. You could have a leak from the coolant to the oil passage, which is causing coolant to mix with oil, giving you the baby poop look inside the cap. Also, if you have a combustion to oil leakage that could cause the seal to go. The oil pressure switch doesn't make ...


1

I would assume, from inspection and not knowing your vehicle, that the upper and lower pcv's operate at different pressures (depressions really as below atmospheric) otherwise they would have had them joined together already...


1

It looks like Volvo is doing something a little abnormal where they have integrated the PCV valve with an oil trap and possibly a couple other components. Lets break it all down: PCV Valve -- positive crankcase ventilation valve This is used to pull gases that collect in the crankcase, through the intake to get burned in the combustion chamber. It is a ...


1

It is returned through the intake because the vacuum presure of the intake matches the crank pressure that needs to be released. You could. Run a mechanical or an electric vacuum pump to release the crank pressure, they say a mechanical pump is better, run of a belt it pumps more at high rpms and less at lower rpms. The right amount of vacuum at the right ...


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