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47

I wouldn't touch the odometer. The rule I always subscribe to is that the odometer measures how far the chassis has rolled. Otherwise a person could go mad trying to figure out which repairs/replacements should reset the clock. (Obviously not tires or wheels, but wheel bearings? Axles/driveshaft? Transmission/differential? etc...) It also makes sense when ...


25

I've never replaced an odometer when replacing an engine. What I will do, however, is make a note in the cars documentation that the engine was replaced at xxx,000 miles with a new/refurbished engine with xx,000 miles. I also keep all the receipts of any ancillary parts replaced at the same time (tensioners, water pumps, etc), so that a new buyer can see ...


14

You're probably better off not replacing the odometer. You will need to keep accurate track of how far the car has been driven in total, so if you were to later sell your car without disclosing that the actual mileage is the new odometer reading + 220k miles, you could be found guilty of fraud. You certainly don't have to replace the odometer, and it will ...


4

It's true that heated O2 sensors shorten the time the engine is in open loop. So the whole "wasting gas thing" while you wait for the engine to warm up isn't as big an issue. But there are many other reasons to not sit and warm up your engine. The most important one is that warming your engine will warm the coolant, but it doesn't warm the oil as quickly as ...


2

Regarding the follow-up comment above... any mechanic or service manager who tries to tell you "too much oil can't damage an engine" is trying to pull a fast one. Too high an oil level causes overpressure that can lead to all kinds of havoc such as blown or damaged oil seals just for starters, to say nothing of the other issues mentioned by others like the ...


2

This is a sensor to tell you it's time to change your oil. Some are triggered at 3000 miles, some at 5000, depends on the year. check your owner's manual to find out how to reset it. It usually involves a number of steps.


2

There's a number of these scratches that run parallel for some distance, and around bends, so this isn't the work of a cat. I'd guess that someone has tried to wipe the surface with a rag or sponge with some specks of abrasive material embedded.


1

Given the position of the scratches on the bonnet, I would suggest that they are likely caused by someone (human) sitting on it. As Phil G says, the pairs of parallel scratches are too far apart to be cat claws (which would be four closely spaced lines, around 4-5mm apart).


1

I will have to agree with the other answer and say that I don't think this was done by a cat. It's hard to tell exactly what did it, but there's a few reasons I don't believe it's a cat. The scratches are too long and parallel as @Phil G pointed out. Cat's generally don't scratch things in this way and their claws are not perfectly parallel. A cat wouldn't ...


1

The wear pattern between the pistons and cylinders, in particular, depends on the engine speed and load. When you are running in the engine, you want to wear away any "high spots" evenly everywhere they occur. If you run at a constant speed and gas pedal position for a long time, you may not be doing that. A long trip on flat roads at a steady 80 mph is ...


1

For starters, cars don't lose all their coolant randomly. There is a reason and it sounds like you have a pretty good idea where the issue is already. It's either the water pump itself or one of the hoses connected to the water pump that is leaking. For a 16 year-old vehicle needing to replace either the water pump or hoses or both would not be unexpected....


1

The short answer is no. Revving the engine in neutral (if the car will allow you to do so) will cause no damage. Most Hybrids I have driven will only start the engine if you fully depress the accelerator in neutral. Even when you do this, the engine is only ticking over and wont rev higher unless it is under load.


1

My understanding of diesel runaway was that it's caused entirely by lubricating oil finding its way into the combustion chamber air charge, usually but not always through a failed oil seal in a turbocharger. Most modern engines (by which I mean 1990s onwards), especially fuel injected ones, operate an "overrun cut-off" mode to save fuel and enhance engine ...


1

How about saveing money. For the mechanic working on your car...20 minutes to remove and replace those stupid and useless eye candy plastic panels before he even fixes what's wrong is costing you money. 90 bucks an hour. I want to see leaks and problems. Take them off.


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