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8

Its a PCV valve in the valve cover, the neck has broken off in the hose, you can get a new pcv valve at most parts stores The link refers to the 1.6L engine, there is an option for the 1.8L engine also. It is just pushed into the rubber grommet, if the rubber is petrified due to heat and age it may be hard to remove and may have to be broken and removed in ...


3

Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) valve !! The function of the PCV valve is to eliminate emissions from the crankcase and send them to the intake and therefore combust them again in another engine cycle, which makes the engine’s emissions cleaner and more effective. If you are a diyer, replace the valve yourself, it would cost you around 5-10 dollars. ...


3

You don't need to know the manufacturer's specific torque specifications for every bolt in your vehicle. Beyond a few specialty threaded fasteners, you just need to know what size and grade or class you're dealing with. While cylinder head bolts should receive the manufacturer's specific torque application, motor mounts can use a more general approach. &...


2

So if I understand correctly, one of your radiator hoses (I'm assuming the UPPER one here since if it was the lower one, they never would have been able to fill it with coolant to begin with) was disconnected or (more likely) became disconnected at some point while you were driving. If that's the case and your engine overheated to the point of stopping, as ...


2

The short answer is no, there isn't any leak stopper formula that will stop all the possible leaks. Your car is oozing, which is very normal after 200k miles! The longer answer is that the leaks could be coming from many systems: Engine seals Transmission/gearbox seals Power steering unit Cooling system Leaks can come from seals, loose or degraded hoses. ...


1

It may or may not be seized, but putting a spanner on it and rotating the engine is one way to find out. Before that I would suggest to check that there are no birds nests in the belts, that you have put fresh fuel through the system and have a properly charged battery - you might find it starts fine unless it wasn’t running when it was left. Once you have ...


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For diagnosing an engine light or other dash lights you will need a scan tool to read the code and then from there you usually go on to read live data in the relevant control module and the last step is component testing to test the suspected faulty components. After this then repair and retest. When reading a check engine light though you to consider that ...


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Many auto parts stores will read the trouble codes for free. They use inexpensive code readers that aren't capable of reading manufacturer-specific codes. But they're free. If you want to work on your car, owning a decent quality scan tool is a very good investment.


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Large bolts are 85 ft.lbs, see diagram below for the rest.


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