57

One of your questions as stated and not answered is: What is the recommended thing to do if you need to pass through an area that's been flooded? The answer to this has nothing to do with Mechanics.SE, but I'll answer it anyway ... Bottom line: DON'T DO IT. It has nothing to do with whether your car can run through the water and survive. It has ...


39

The term you're looking for is Wading Depth which is specified by the manufacturer. They may surprise you, and its info you should know about your vehicle. Its in your manual, or search it online. Examples Jeeps say 500mm, and some models go to 700mm Mercedes GLC SUV has a wading depth of just 300mm Landrover Discovery (not the more compact Discovery ...


26

Generally the car shouldn't be driven through water! On your Yaris, where you had high revs, what would happen if your air intake was submerged would be that your engine would fill some cylinder(s) with water and since water doesn't compress it would bend a piston. This is called hydro locking and is often a catastrophic failure. So don't do that if you want ...


19

Does this mod ever give a measurable increase in power? tl;dr: yes, sometimes it works well. But... Your picture is a good illustration of some of the problems with just saying "cold air intake" and expecting that to mean the same thing to all people. Let's break down the pieces of the puzzle and talk about how those might help or hurt: Filter: notice ...


13

There are two major problems incurred by not changing your air filter: As your air filter becomes full of dirt, pollen, crap, what have you, it becomes a restriction on the air inlet. This will degrade performance on the vehicle (as you stated). This will cause you more wear and tear on the engine (having to push the engine harder for it to make up the ...


12

There are a lot of variables here, but key risks are: water shorting electrical systems water being sucked into air intake (or potentially into exhaust) cold water coming into contact with hot metal causing thermal shock The first one is very dependent on where and how wiring systems are routed and protected. Fuse boxes, connectors, battery etc are ...


10

I don't have any empirical evidence for this, but would say no for two reasons: An air filter will collect more dust, dirt, and debris until it gets so full that it starts pushing the older dust, dirt, and debris through the filter, which is what you are trying to prevent in the first place. As the air filter collects more dust, dirt, and debris, the ...


10

It will have no affect on the longevity of the engine or components as long as you get one with a decent filter on it. You'll have to check reviews on different elements to ensure you are getting one which is good. We'll not mention which ones I think are better, as that gets into the realm of both shopping and opinion. In and of themselves, CAI's will not ...


9

An air filter that is severely restricting air flow can increase oil use. It is not common. If the air filter is restricted enough a low pressure condition is set up in the intake tube and PCV system. Oil is pulled from the upper valve cover oil/air separator cavities through the PCV fresh air hose into the intake tube. If this is happening there will be ...


9

The point is to feel like you've done something cool to your car and freed it from the shackles of The Man/the OEM intake. The primary benefit of Cold Air Intakes is to the bank account of the kit manufacturer, the secondary benefit is your car making a nicer noise, if you like the sound of an aftermarket intake. There's been a few debunkings of CAIs over ...


9

I spent several weeks researching this issue not that many years ago. I read all sorts of claims and "proof" that a $50 air filter will improve your vehicle's acceleration, horsepower, torque, longevity, etc. There would always be something about the "proof" that seemed questionable. Then I read a most insightful comment. The insightful author pointed ...


9

"Performance" at all costs isn't what a manufacturer wants. They want the best, most efficient performance that will still provide the engine a very long lifetime and keep the cost down as much as possible Some things an aftermarket filter might change: More expensive Requires more maintenance (like an "oiled" K&N Filter) Could increase engine noise ...


9

It all depends on what you mean by getting better. It is possible that, as the very small holes in the filter that let air through start to trap particles, the places where air can get through will get smaller and smaller. Therefore the filter will start to trap smaller and smaller particles. The air filter may get more efficient at filtering, but it will ...


8

If it was just a normal paper filter it is fine. If it is a re-usable washable filter then then I would suggest a wash and oiling procedure according to the manufacturer instructions.


8

Jetting a carburettor - short answer You will require two things more than likely. A size larger main jet An adjustable needle jet Smoothbore Carburettor Image Your main jet sits in the float bowl, it's number 11. Off idle and higher the main jet contributes more and more to air fuel mixture as you open the throttle to wide open where the main jet is 99%...


8

I wouldn't You have a carburetor on that bike. You may need to do some adjustments, if not, you will make the air fuel ratio leaner and that will be really hard on your exhaust valves. The more oxygen you have in your air fuel ratio beyond 14.1:1 will increase your combustion temperature. This, in turn, can damage your exhaust valves due to too much heat....


8

Some people think that a cold air intake will generally improve engine performance, allowing fuel to combust at lower temperatures, increasing fuel efficiency. They believe the lower temperature is actually better for the engine. Performance air filters, if you get a good quality one, might typically allow more air flow while reducing foreign particulate ...


7

You want to be getting as much cold air as possible, as colder air is denser and thus gives your engine more oxygen for a given volume (and thus more power/better efficiency) - that's why the filter in the picture is surrounded be shields, to prevent it drawing in warm air from the engine bay - I'd assume that area in front that filter is open to atmosphere (...


7

Are you talking about the in-cabin air filter, or the engine air filter? In either case, the answer is no. I mean you can do it, but the filter will not work like it is supposed to afterwards. The reason for this is they are made of paper. When you get them wet like you are suggesting, it destroys the element. As to the why you have to change them, once ...


7

It depends. Just because an intake can flow more air mass doesn't guarantee that the engine will utilize it. The intake is part of a system of components. The engine produces power by managing air flow into and out of the combustion chamber. There are usually other actors involved: Intake side. Carburetors, throttle bodies, intake manifolds, intake valves,...


7

Modern gasoline engines have sensors to measure the amount of air that enters the engine. The ECU then injects fuel to give the correct mixture to get the most efficient burn. A dirty air filter will first show itself by limiting the flow of air at high throttle positions. Rather than causing a rich mixture however, the ECU will see the low air flow and ...


6

Specifically a foam filter for a lawn mower needs oiled, but just lightly. A foam filter lacks the ability to stop small particles as compared to a paper filter. The oil is added to make the filter "sticky" to these small particles giving the foam filter better filtering capability. As far as major engine damage, probably not. Worst case scenario the engine ...


6

If anything, your bike should be running lean Thoughts You put an aftermarket non-restrictive exhaust on your MV, that increases the flow of gasses which requires more fuel to compensate for the additional flow. So, the idea that your bike is running rich doesn't really resonate. It certainly can be and if it is it could be indicative of another issue ...


6

The reason your car has an air filter is because a little bit of dirt can cause engine damage. Dirt will abrade valves and other mechanical parts before getting caught by the oil filter. A little bit occasionally isn't going to do much, however if you saw dust going into the intake you should vacuum it out before you start the car. Cleaning the housing is ...


5

If the prints are just on the seal, I wouldn't worry about it. You could possibly take some gentle cleaner (Windex or Formula 409 or the like which will clean grease) and make it pretty again. It won't, however, decrease the function of the filter in any way. If they got a bunch of oil on the element itself, you might want to think about it. Really nothing ...


5

There is no need to reprogram the ECU This is for a couple of reasons: The engine barely feels a difference Contrary to what the name implies, a "free-flowing" intake impacts the pressure at the valve inlet and not the volume of fresh inlet air per cycle. Here are the numbers to back it up: K&N provide detailed test data for the Yamaha R15, which ...


5

The exact answer to this is - It Depends... The reason for this is that your existing ECU, whether it be on a bike or in a car, has a range of inputs and a range out outputs, and a mapping between them. As long as your inputs are within the ranges expected, it may well be able to cope with the changed architecture, however there are two common problems: If ...


5

If driving with multiple filters, your vehicle will lose performance. Your car will have a greater restriction in the intake system from having to pass through two separate elements. You would, however, have cleaner air coming into the system, but at a cost of the performance. You'll have to have more gas pedal to compensate which would cause other issues as ...


5

If you use more than one air filter, you will make it harder for the engine to suck air into the intake manifold, meaning you will lose power. Less restrictive filters will give you more performance, but will allow more dirt into the engine. If you use something like a cone filter (like in the second picture), you will have a change in sound, especially ...


5

depends on if you have carburetors or fuel injection If you have a carburetor Cons You will make the bike have a lean condition Backfire on deceleration More oxygen will create more engine heat and this will cause additional wear on components You could burn your exhaust valves Pros You could buy a jet kit and pipe to go with it and get a few extra HP ...


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