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44

That sounds very risky to me. The portions of the plugs that reside in the combustion chamber are designed to tolerate the heat and pressure there. I don't think they will melt. So what will happen is that those parts are likely to remain in the cylinder and may get caught between the top of the piston and the head and/or valves. That is likely to do more ...


32

Do NOT drive a car with a piece of sparkplug inside the engine. It can (and likely will) lead to serious damage (up to a catastrophic engine failure). Get your car towed to a service and have the pieces of the broken plug removed. Additionally, get the oil changed (probably with a flush too, to remove all the debris). You will have to spend some money on ...


24

That's a nice car - don't be a consumer and break it because you're too lazy to fix it properly. Sadly the "proper" fix is to tow it to your mechanic, who will take the head off and fish out the broken pieces. He'll also check the head and valves for damage while its off, and make a recommendation. An old engine idling at low speed might happily burp out ...


20

It is highly probable that the reason your car was reluctant to start was that the time you were running diagnostics had sapped some of the charge from the battery. The battery on the car will not charge unless the engine is running. It is unlikely that this device would harm your vehicle but it is theoretically (and practically) possible to do temporary ...


18

If this happened during a plug change If you have roadside assistance/towing, I would highly recommend getting it towed home, then purchase a cheap USB inspection camera or a inspection unit like this one from Harbor Freight and look inside the spark plug hole to see if there is any remnants of the plug and any trauma to the exhaust value. If it happened ...


10

The hump provides longitudinal rigidity in the unibody. The fact that it also provides a place to route the exhaust is a bonus. Notice that modern CAD-designed vehicles have much less of an obvious hump, unless they also have a roofless option (cabriolet, convertible, removable hardtop). On these vehicles the center hump is the main rigid structure in the ...


10

I would guess that there is an issue with the spring on your latch. Most hood latches follow the same basic design. As you push the hood closed, a bar on the hood pushes into a hook in the latch, and rotates the hook in such a way that the bar is retained by it. As this happens, a spring is tensioned until finally the mechanism becomes locked in place. A ...


9

To my knowledge there is no way a scanner can cause issues with your computer electronics. This device is a read only device. It doesn't change anything in your computer. It does, however, communicate with the computer. Through this communication it can give the computer commands, such as to clear the codes. This doesn't write anything to the computer, but ...


9

No question - running the engine will break it. If you're "unlucky", there's enough clearance between the piston and the valves to fit the spark plug. In that case you'll have the spark plug rattling around inside the cylinder. In approximate order, this will first destroy the valves which will not seal properly when their edges and seat faces get damaged,...


8

Anyone can feel free to disagree with me since I'm not 100% on this, but I believe those bumps are placed into the design in order to give the exhaust system a little more breathing room. Note the hump in the actual body of the car above the exhaust here. This is to aid in keeping unwanted heat away from the passenger area of the car while the heat shield ...


8

I don't think the hump is there just for the exhaust, although as was pointed out in the comment it adds ground clearance which is a nice thing. The "transmission hump" (in honor of rear wheel drive cars) also adds structural strength – essentially a beam running down the center of the car. I suspect that if it wasn't needed (or at least very useful) for ...


7

To answer your questions, if there is a real leak, then yes, there is a problem. The oil will cause the belt to deteriorate and possibly slip. When it does, it is catastrophic. Pistons slam against valves and the head is toast (in most cases). This does happen suddenly. Get a different shop to look at it. If the belt appears dry, I would bet there isn't an ...


7

The injector has a plunger/pintle which is controlled by an electromagnet. The humming you heard is from that. The plunger/pintle has a spring which pushes back against the electromagnet so when the power is shut off, the plunger will close and stop the flow of fuel. This causes the hum. Here is an example of how an injector is built: When the power is ...


7

No, it won't get damaged. But you also shouldn't let the battery totally empty for long periods. Li-ion batteries are best stored with some charge (normally about 40% is recommended charge level for long term storage per battery university :)) Volvo says that if you press the 'save' button your car will keep reserve charge or charge the batteries from ...


6

The Engine System Service Required is a service interval indicator. The engine check light coming on will mean you have a fault. You can simply re-set the Engine System Service Required by carrying out a simply re-set. Button A is located at the bottom and to the left of your speedo. Ensure all doors are closed, Turn the ignition key to position 1(...


6

The cheapest, easiest thing you can try is to disconnect your battery for 30 minutes (check your owner's manual for the proper way of doing this). When you connect the battery again, your electric windows would have reset their soft limits (so called because the SOFTware learns what "fully open" and "fully closed" "feels" like). You'll notice that your ...


6

No. The tool in and of itself cannot do any "harm" to the vehicle. If you were testing apps with the engine off, it is quite possible that the battery may have drained to the extent that it gave some hiccups while starting. Low fuel level may also be to blame here. However, If the vehicle has error codes present which are cleared with the tool, the ...


5

Old, tired wiring will often cause dim headlamps as halogen bulbs are very sensitive to low voltages. As Jaime says, a lot of older cars didn't have relayed headlamps (although I would have expected Volvo to do so), so if you've not got them, the full current for the lamps is runnning through the entire wiring system. The best way to test this is to check ...


5

The most common reason for this is getting skin oil onto the bulb during changing of the bulb. This will kill most every bulb on the market today. This creates hot spots on the bulb which will cause the filaments to burn out at an accelerated rate. If you aren't already, use clean, new, nitrile gloves to keep the oil off. If you don't have nitrile gloves, ...


5

Just this morning I connected an ELM327 to a '05 Volvo XC90. After only 1km, the message was displayed for "Anti-skid service required", and then "Anti-skid temporarily unavailable". I removed the ELM, and went home, and checked the car on the laptop based Volvo VIDA/DICE. This showed a BCM fault, CAN network communication error with SAS (steering angle ...


5

Regular service and fixing what's broken will keep just about any car running for a long time. The main difference with driving short distances, is that your engine spends more time at less than optimal temperature. This is not as big a deal with modern fuel injection engines, but parts may still wear out faster than vehicles with mostly 'highway miles.' ...


5

Nice engine you got there! While your issues do sound like a MAF problem (check the MAF readings via OBD!), some turbocharged Volvos are notorious for fuel pressure regulator issues. Basically the regulator diaphragm ruptures and fuel gets into the pressure regulation vacuum hose. Typically this causes poor starting (especially cold) because of an ...


5

The car will charge its battery while driving, e.g. when you brake. This allows the electric motor to augment the diesel engine, reducing overall fuel usage. The result is that the charge state of the battery constantly changes. In other hybrids (Toyota Prius) the control system keeps the battery charge in a range that optimizes battery lifetime (i.e. ...


5

In most cars it's not the key remembering the car, but the car remembering the key. Your Volvo should be no different. Reading through your owners manual, it gives no warnings about taking this to the dealer for battery replacement, but rather gives you the owner instructions on how to change out the battery. Here is the page taken from the owners manual:


5

Which sensor was removed? Pre- or post-cat? If pre-cat, it could be causing the engine to run differently. If post-cat, it's just noise and your engine shouldn't be running any differently ... it just sounds that way. For most cars (and I'd bet your Volvo is one of them), the after cat O2 sensor does nothing for the running of the engine, it just checks for ...


5

Yes, I'd take it back to the shop to see if there is something they missed. While 300 rpm at 60mph is not a huge difference, to me this is about the difference of when a lock up torque converter isn't locking up. This could be a programming issue which wasn't taken into account with the new CEM. While it isn't a huge issue, it will cause greater wear of ...


5

There is another possibility : in the UK there are companies that will make you a stainless exhaust from scratch - don't have a name to hand, but a friend had his subaru done and it is much better. Here's one, no affiliation, just one that came up after a search: www.powerflowexhausts.co.uk


5

What is the mistake a rank amateur at this is most likely to make? Honestly.. it's attempting to do it themselves. You mention: I am an OCD type I can pretty much guarantee that the result of doing a touch up will be just as noticeable (if not more so) than the original mark. As a fellow OCD type I can certainly sympathize and it's because of this that ...


4

I've owned several FWD cars and the clicking, especially while turning or accelerating, is a pretty sure sign of a CV (constant velocity) joint going. So if your mechanic told you "joints," +1 to that. Further info: You can usually drive a ways (5000mi/8000km) before the sound becomes unbearable. I never got past the clicking phase, but I'm told you ...


4

Having owned several of that generation Volvo ('93 965, '94 964, '94 965), I will start by saying "The US delivery Volvo headlights of that era are terrible!" The light does not go where it needs to go, and even adding more light will not help that much. I have had some success putting the Sylvania XS bulbs in. They have a slightly different spectrum from ...


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