Hot answers tagged

34

Yes. One of your brake pads on the caliper side of the brakes had been worn so far down it popped out of place. Now you are stopping using the caliper piston against the brake rotor. You will now have to not only get the brake pads and rotors replaced, but the caliper as well. If you cannot fix this yourself, you should get the vehicle towed to a repair shop....


18

It sounds like your alternator has not been tightened enough and the serpentine belt is slipping because of it. Since you have new belts on your engine, this is probably about the only thing which it can be. If you press on the belt with your thumb at the center of the long portion of the belt (between pulleys), you should get no more than about 1/2" inch of ...


16

Most likely cause for this is that you have some condensation built up overnight on either the belt or one of the pulley wheels, and until this has evaporated the belt will be able to slip a little, causing a squeak. Once the engine warms up, the condensation is gone. With a new, well tensioned belt, this shouldn't matter, however belts age and stretch, ...


16

Yes, at least half of the exhaust is coming straight out of that gap without passing through the muffler. As you've noted, this leads to an increase in noise (or music, depending on your taste). To my eye, that looks like a hassle to fix on your own. There appears to be the rusted remnants of two bolts holding the Y-pipe to the passenger side muffler and ...


14

Your AC drain may be stopped up. Your AC evaporator condenses water when the warm moist air passes over it, this happens in the normal operation of the AC. There is a drain that is suppose to drain the water outside the car, when it gets stopped up water collects in the evaporator case under the dash, it will eventually drain somewhere, most likely on your ...


13

This is absolutely normal. What's going on is they are seating the beads of the tire against the rims. In order to get them to do this, they have to over pressurize the tires a bit, which then allows the beads to pop over the sides and seat hard against the rims. This ensures they are in position correctly on the rim and promotes sealing after the fact.


12

It turns out that the brake pads were improperly installed. Furthermore, the problem seemed to occur far more often when the breaks were wet. I'm not sure if that caused the pads to "slip" more or what.


12

It is the sound of the fuel pump priming and pressurizing the fuel lines, which is absolutely normal. VW likes to use the opening of the driver door to trigger fuel rail pressurization. In fact, one could use the absence of the sound of the fuel pump as a tell-tale sign that the fuel pump relay is not functioning properly. As @Paulster2 points out, either ...


11

Most of the time a ground loop is the cause of this problem. This problem is common especially if your stereos speakers are amplified, and can be fixed my making sure that your stereo unit and/or amplifier have a good ground connection. This can be done by either finding a more direct ground connection to the cars frame, sanding the area around your ground ...


11

I think you threw a wheel weight. Let's consider this quote from the great Wikipedia: When the wheel rotates, asymmetries of mass may cause it to hop or wobble, which can cause ride disturbances, usually vertical and lateral vibrations. It can also result in a wobbling of the steering wheel or of the entire vehicle. The ride disturbance, due to ...


11

It sounds like the brake pads have either completely worn through or otherwise failed, your car is not safe to drive at all. In this case you will certainly need new pads on both sides and possibly new rotors (disks) if they have been scored by metal/metal contact. Depending on exactly what has failed the calipers and pistons may be ok but they need to ...


10

It could be incorrectly torqued wheels, loose disc brake calipers, brake pad shims, suspension pieces loading/unloading from the weight shift. If they just did the tires, take it back and tell them to take a look (for free). Try slowing the car down with the engine. If it's manual, just downshift. If it is automatic, shift the selector to one of the lower ...


10

From personal experience, I'd replaced ALOT of these working at the dealership. It wasn't just the accords either, it was quite a few Honda and Acuras that used the same design and power delivery system. The most common issues I saw out of probably close to 100+ failures of these was: Ground strap on the starter becoming corroded. Bad ground to engine Your ...


10

It sounds like a valve adjustment is required There are many items that can make a 'ticking' noise that is tied to the RPM of the vehicle. Having the sound match RPM's certainly gives a clue that it is associated with the operation of the engine. Many times a valve adjustment is required. This is a component of a regular maintenance schedule for almost ...


9

It is quite likely the work performed has introduced a subtle air leak that only manifests itself under high boost. Pressurizing the intake tract with the car off will help you identify the source of the leak. A hose fitting that isn't honked down all the way will exhibit this kind of behavior under boost. I like how Jafro figured out the source of his car'...


9

In the simplest terms possible, the windshield acts as a spoiler or fairing, pushing the air out and up as your vehicle gains speed. The air naturally will push back to be along the side of the vehicle. With the front windows open, there is enough pressure to push the air out away from the windows to give the feeling of less drag. With the rear windows, ...


9

I see this completely normal and not a cause of concern. The service advisor's explanation is certainly a valid reason, but they could have needed to drive the car for a total of 19kms for many legitimate reasons: The service technician could not diagnose the source of the noise on his own, so he went back and picked up another service technician to help ...


8

As discussed in the comments already, the clicking you hear is probably the starter solenoid. You have ruled out a weak battery being the probable cause by attempting to the jump-start the engine. This means either the power cable running directly from the battery to the starter motor is too resistive/poorly connected, or that the starter motor itself is no ...


8

When you start the engine and you hear the sound, does it sound better after the vehicle is warmed up? A rod knock will only sound worse (louder) as the engine heats up. It will not go away as the engine gets warmer. If it does, it is probably something like an exhaust leak which closes itself as the engine manifolds get warm. The opposite could be true as ...


7

The front suspension has a lot of travel (e.g: bumps are fairly comfortable, but the car is 'rebounding' for a long while after the bump.) I'm going to go ahead and call it: you've used up your shocks. A lot of people forget that a shock (aka strut aka damper depending on your particular flavor) is a consumable part. It exists to damp out the cyclic ...


7

It was the speedometer cable. Lubing it with WD-40 has helped significantly. Cold weather makes it worse. It's coming from the dashboard, and is correlated with wheel speed, and it sounds like the noise at http://youtu.be/ICiJuEBbf6A, except it's more consistent once it starts.


7

If I am not mistaken the 2001 Yamaha Diversion has a clutch cable and does not have a hydraulic self adjusting clutch mechanism. This was my son's first motorcycle and we experienced similar issues with his. I will say that this model is bullet proof. Especially the 8 valve air cooled version which you have. Throw Out Bearing If your throw out bearing ...


7

Unidirectional tires should NOT be cross rotated. "Uni" implies one, as in one direction (nothing to do with singing). Radials in general should not be cross rotated. They start behaving as you have discribed, with the noise and all. With all this said, I don't believe your tires are unidirectional, but again, once radials have been driven for a period of ...


7

That sounds to me like a vacuum leak. Most cars have servo-assisted brakes (the reason it's much harder to brake if the engine is switched off), which is usually powered by a vacuum line taken off the inlet manifold (so that as the engine sucks in air and fuel, it also sucks air out of the servo). If you look in the engine bay at the point nearest the ...


7

Diagnosing noises when you're thousands of miles away isn't going to be easy, but here are a few tips to help you out: remove the serpentine belt and run the engine If the noise stops, you know that the noise source is something that is running off the serpentine. inspect the belt for loss of tension Loose belts are notorious for squealing spin the ...


7

After taking it back to the shop, the tech. diagnosed it as "the new back tire inside rim wheel weights are rubbing" (apparently they didn't rub when those tires were in the front). So rebalance the rear wheels (i.e. new wheel weights) and I'm back in business. Update: got this again at a different date, even after doing a balancing. I just told the guy ...


7

it sounds like valves Your valves are at the top of the motor under the black cover. They are reciprocating devices, they move in and out and are operated by a camshaft that is spinning at half the RPM of the crankshaft. As your cam rides on top of a tappet or 'bucket' the clearance between the cam and the tappet/bucket can increase or decrease over time. ...


7

While @DucatiKiller is most likely correct, there is another possible reason for this noise, that being a leaking exhaust manifold. If the exhaust manifold is leaking at the head, it will make an almost indistinguishable noise from that of the tappets. It too rises and falls with engine RPM, just like tappet noise. It comes from the same basic location (head ...


7

I Believe It's a Hose Connection Point Unmetered air whether it's a negative pressure or positive pressure is bad. That being said, I find it interesting that losing some of the boost isn't detected and triggering a CEL. So that maps to your idea of a smaller leak along with the not subtle high pitched sound. You said If it were a bad gasket, I'd ...


6

I happen to have the same experience as you when sitting in my 1998 Honda Accord after it has been shut off. The humming sound lasts 5-6 seconds, and it can be 5 to 10 minutes apart. The noise is definitely coming from underneath the car ahead of the rear wheels, not from the engine. I have also noticed that I have never heard the noise in the winter, ...


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