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40

Many car doors are designed to open from the inside when locked so that the occupants can escape the car in an emergency, it's totally normal, although not all cars have that feature. In a car fire you don't want to have to fumble for the lock in order to get out. How this works is different for many manufacturers, and between cars. On my current mercedes ...


29

You'll find that most driver's doors can be unlocked/opened from the inside by pulling the handle without first unlocking them. This is due to the driver's assumed competence in deciding when it is a proper time to open the door. In contrast, the rear doors do not typically unlock when the handle is pulled due to the likelihood that children occupy those ...


12

Yes what you presume is correct. Depending on total volume of coolant (different for each vehicle) how much pure AF I put in, anywhere from 1/2 to 1 gallon, then top off with 50/50 mix. It is better to be over the 50% mix than under, you can go as high as 70%, so don't worry about putting a little too much pure AF after flushing the cooling system with ...


10

On the 2003 Corolla the release for rear seats is in the trunk. There are two knobs close to the hinges of the trunk. Those are the rear seat back releases. If you push them toward the rear of the car they will pop and release the rear seat backs and you can fold them down and access the trunk. This assumes of course that you have access to the inside of ...


10

The coolant capacity of the 2004 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.8L 4-cyl Engine Code [R] 1ZZ-FE is 6.9 quarts. To accurately ensure you have a 50/50 mix in your system after a flush (assuming you actually flush it until you have clear liquid draining out), is to add 1/2 of the coolant as straight coolant (not 50/50 mix), then fill the rest as distilled water. For ...


10

A P2757 DTC is a torque converter clutch solenoid valve issue The valve engages a torque converter at higher speeds to lock your transmission and engine at a 1:1 ratio. This engagement, obviously, only happens at higher speeds for fuel saving. Causes include; Dirty transmission fluid Faulty line pressure solenoid valve SLU Line pressure solenoid valve ...


10

Well, here's what ended up working. From inside the car, roll down the window. There's a piece of rubber weatherstripping along the outside bottom edge of the window, pry it out gently with a flat head screwdriver. It's only held by little tabs. Remove the inside door handle. It's 1 screw, then you need to slide the handle assembly forward (there are 4 L-...


9

I'm struggling to find the question you are asking here but taking the literal question "Would you assume the mechanic broke your camshaft if your car would not start due to broken camshaft around 30 miles after they repaired a different issue under the hood?" my answer would be "No." If a camshaft were broken by a mechanic or anyone else, the car would not ...


8

You stated that "Only pads have been replaced in the brake components." If the rotors were not turned (machined) or replaced at the same time, this could be a problem. The surface of the rotor needs to be fresh, or the brakes will not work up to expectations. Also, consideration must be given to the proper "bedding" of the brakes. If they were not bedded ...


7

If oil drips on a pulley or a belt then the rotation of those objects could sling the oil everywhere, even as high as the bottom of the hood. Most likely an oil leak would have to be above these components and a good guess would be through something like a failed valve cover gasket. Another possibility is that it is leaking near the front of the car ...


7

Can you tell which wheel(s) the noise is coming from? If you can, jack the car up and support it on stands, then remove the wheel(s) in question, and visually inspect the pads and discs, including the back of the disc between it and the stone-shield. It might be as simple as a stone stuck in the brakes, or you might find that one of the calipers has been ...


7

To answer the question about what changed with vehicles requiring longer oil change intervals, the answer is that there are a number of factors. Internal tolerances have improved, oil quality standards have improved, and friction-reducing techniques have been developed making the 3,000 mile oil change rule of thumb an anachronism. Even in the most stressful ...


7

I had a 2011 Toyota Yaris with a manual transmission, and I believe I know what your problem is (see Is it common to fail engaging first gear or a manual transmission car occasionally?). The problem is that the parts in the transmission are in an unfavourable position, just at the position which prevents engaging the gear. And they stay in that position ...


6

I recommend looking for a replacement side panel. Otherwise the standard panel beating approach is to try and hammer out the worst of the dents first. Car bog/filler/bondo is a last step to fill minor imperfections. This is harder than it sounds. Panels that have been creased or stretched seldom pop back to thier original position. Judging by your photo the ...


6

Assuming that you have no faults with your transmission, it doesn't matter - an automatic transmission will automatically switch down gear as and when it needs to. All the '2' gear does is not let you go over 2nd gear - which if you were heading downhill could make your engine over-rev...generally not recommended. So D should be just fine.


6

Using your scan tool watch fuel trims at idle, then while still stopped @ 3000 rpm. Fuel trims going to normal (anything below LTFT 10%) when revving point towards a vacuum leak or faulty MAF. To check the AFR sensor pull a vacuum line with the engine running and it should go high lean. Then introduce fuel and it should go high rich. Toyota/Denso sensors ...


6

You can use a coolant mixture tester to test the coolant to water ratio. Any auto parts store should carry them.


6

I think you need to reseal the timing cover I found several images uploaded in a ZIP by an enterprising Corolla owner. Here's an image showing the O-ring you replaced next to the water pump/pulley assembly. If that was leaking you would see water dribbling down the front of the timing chain cover. Here is another image showing how the gasket maker/sealant ...


5

Get rid of the extra fans. If you're having to run fans constantly to keep the engine at the right temperature in the city, then all you're doing is masking another issue. You probably have several other issues. The engine temperature and the transmission going being able to shift into overdrive should be independent. It seems like you are conflating two ...


5

Checking the Key Off amperage draw is the standard test for this symptom. An ammeter that is very accurate in the Milliamp range is needed. Low quality meters are readily available and can quickly lead one to a false conclusion. The test: Remove ignition key, wrap in aluminum foil if Smart Key, Wait at least five minutes, newer smarter cars will need ...


5

If you have rattling on acceleration and the fuel economy is depressed, it is very likely that the catalytic converter core has cracked and it is blocking the exhaust now. You can try to measure its efficiency first by looking if the rear O2 sensor voltage reading after heating is steady (so the catalytic converter is good) or jumping (so it is bad). If it ...


5

Make sure all tires are at the specified pressure. Locate the tire pressure monitor reset button Switch the key to the off position, turn the key to the on position and hold the TPMS reset button until the light shuts off.


5

Rattling has to do with loose parts. The bass frequencies are causing the parts to vibrate against each other. You will need to isolate the rattle, and tighten the part making the noise. Many times it just needs a little adjustment. If the part is unable to be tightened any farther, you may need to add some type of buffer material, like thin foam padding. ...


5

Replace the battery and those issues will stop. Reason? The bad battery is so discharged after starting the engine the alternator takes a few seconds to bring the system voltage high enough for some electronics to work properly.


4

Yes, the normal route is to add sound deadening material inside the doors and/or on the floor of the car. A corolla won't have much stock insulation so you should be able to make some good progress in reducing it. This is a common project for people who are installing nice audio systems, so you should be able to find some nice walk-throughs on audio sites.


4

First job is to refill the engine with oil. Check for the correct oil in your vehicles hand book or ask at your local parts counter. Check with the vehicles owner for a history of any oil leaks. Do not start or drive the vehicle without oil. Check for the oil filler cap having been replaced correctly. Check that the PCV hoses are in place and in good ...


4

To liner or not to liner, ahhh. That is the question. It's a bit of a crapshoot. A well-designed liner will keep the debris off the important bits. A not-well-designed liner will accumulate the nasties at an alarming rate. Being a Subaru geek, I can tell you that Fuji Heavy Industries (Subaru) tried really hard to protect the fuel filler neck with some ...


4

As well as being a parking brake warning light, that is also a service brake warning light - i.e. it warns you of problems with the main footbrake. Given what you have described, my first thought would be to check the brake fluid level - if it is near the 'min' mark, you will need to top it up from a fresh, unopened container. If it is empty, or below the '...


4

This sounds to me more like an alignment problem that you need to get checked. To do more diagnosis, I would jack the front of the car up so that both front wheels are just off the ground then turn the steering wheel to see if I could still feel the difference in resistance. If there is a difference, then there is something wrong, because the struts should ...


4

I'll take a swing at this ... The engine in your car, whether it's the Single Overhead Cam (SOHC) or Double Overhead Cam (DOHC) version, has a vacuum actuated (non-electronic) idle air control valve. It looks something like this: Since it is vacuum operated, I'd suggest you check the vacuum lines to ensure they are in good order (check for cracks, tears, ...


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