Hot answers tagged

8

If your engine turns over fast enough with the systems operational in a manner sufficient to start the engine, even if the engine is running only 10-30 seconds, and you've released the key from the start position, the battery/starter circuit is out of the picture. Your assumption is correct.


3

Using silicone grease before you shrink the tube is not a problem,except the shrink tube might slide off easier. A better solution than using grease is probably to get shrink tube that has glue on the inside,i know it cost a bit more but after you have shrinked it on it will not go anywhere. It is this type https://www.amazon.com/Ancor-Marine-Electrical-...


2

At 40 AH capacity that means your 1.5A 15V charger will take 26 hours to provide a 40 AH charge to the battery. You could try hooking it up for 2-3 hours and see if you can get enough charge to start the engine. The 1.5A charge current is going to be nearly "trickle" charge level for an auto battery.


2

You use grease on terminals to protect them from corrosion due to oxygen exposure, the shrink tubing will do the same job so there's no point putting grease inside. In fact, the grease is more likely to get squeezed into the wrong place and prevent a good seal, so my advice is not to use it.


2

No, it will not hurt your vehicle. There are other vehicles as you've stated in your excerpt which it might, for the reasons given. Yours is not one of them. There are a couple of caveats: Be aware of is the codes for the radio. Ensure you have them before removing the battery. Along those lines, you'll most likely lose all of your radio settings as well. ...


1

When you follow the wiring diagrams, the alternator is directly connected to the battery (if that connection fails the the alternator can be damaged) and the battery is connected to the vehicle electrical system. The common point is usually the battery positive terminal or the other end of the battery positive cable. Removing the battery still leaves the ...


1

If the 18650 batteries are not being discharged, they will maintain their charge fairly readily. Doing what you are suggesting by ensuring they are fully charged at least once a month will maintain their health. Lithium Ion batteries do have an expected lifespan of two to three years or 300-500 charge cycles, whichever comes first. According to this document:...


1

Use a volt meter to check the battery voltage when the engine is running and again when it is stopped. If the voltage is 13v or above when the engine is running, then the alternator is working fine. If the alternator appears to be working and the voltage is below 12v when the engine is stopped then your battery is likely dying. The easiest way to test the ...


1

Bear in mind that a battery cap has a ventilation hole and you risk an explosion from a build-up in pressure, or the cork popping out and leaving the cell open. Not all batteries need to be vented but you should check. See if you can acquire a replacement cap from a dead battery at your local shop. If they are friendly they might say "just give the fitter ...


1

As long as they are high-temperature dielectric silicon, not just generic white lithium you should be ok to apply and it would add an extra layer of protection. I'm not a big fan of using white lithium (usually what I find in spray cans) on electrical components. Examples of high-temperature dielectric silicon/grease https://www.ecstuning.com/Search/...


1

Yes... But you also run the risk of damaging the donor car’s alternator. So, the method I use is to connect the cables and then start the donor car and run at 2000rev/min for 5 to 10 minutes. This puts some charge into the other battery. Then turn off the donor engine and start the other car. People will say “but I have always run the engine on the donor ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible