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This ended up being a bad negative terminal connected to the battery. The vibration at engine start was just enough to disrupt the connection. When I jumped the car, the clamp secured the terminal and the connection -- and, of course, the extra juice helped too. I confirmed at the dealership (don't judge) that the alternator and starter are fine. Make sure ...


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If he has a classic car with a positive ground (as opposed to almost all if not all modern cars that have a negative ground) then there is no danger and that is the proper terminal to disconnect. On the other hand, if his car has a negative ground this can be dangerous. The danger is present while disconnecting the battery. If while loosening the terminal ...


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My question is, Is it ok, not to have it fixed? Will this cause problems in the future if I decided not to have it fix? If the problem is the starter motor itself then leaving it has two potential downsides: It may eventually fail completely - sod's law ensures that if it does so it will be at the most inconvenient time possible, either because you're ...


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In 35 years, I've never heard of a battery exploding by itself. A battery with the negative removed will not spark. I've seen a few cars burn, but it was always due to leaking gasoline. If you can smell gasoline/petrol, it is definitely a fire hazard. If not, there is no concern.


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Well... cars (and car batteries) are made to not spontaniously catch fire. Unless if you have electrical issues, but even that is not likely to cause a fire, especially since you have the battery disconnected. If you want to be extra sure, you can remove the fuel from the fuel tank, but that's probably overkill.


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I believe your thinking on how a thermostat works is misguided. It can be fully open or fully closed, or anywhere in between. When the engine is cold, most thermostats are completely closed and stay that way until the engine coolant gets to operating temperature, then open the needed amount to allow coolant to flow until it gets back down to the operating ...


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It depends on the type of battery that you have. All batteries have what is called a self-discharge rate. It means that the battery loses certain percentage of charge just from sitting unconnected without being charged. The best answer would be to purchase a battery maintainer, such as the "battery tender" brand, or any other that is ...


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I do what you are describing every winter in my RV and it starts fine in the spring, I have a marine disconnect on the negative terminal specifically for this purpose, and it's been fine sitting 4 to 5 months each winter since 2014. Regular lead acid batteries do have a significant self discharge rate and by the time spring rolls around you are going to be ...


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If you do only as you describe, you'll probably return to a completely dead and useless battery. According to the usbattery web site: don’t expect to charge your batteries and come back in the spring expecting everything to be okay The freezing point of a fully charged battery is listed as -80 °F and a fully discharged battery freezes at 20 °F. That may be ...


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