Hot answers tagged

34

This is something that used to be quite common - in the '60s and '70s, people would add an electronic (or manual) overdrive to the back of the 4-speed gearbox to give an extra gear (usually two, as it would operate in both 3rd and 4th, although on many cars the difference between overdrive-3rd and direct-4th was very little). It's unlikely to be possible on ...


33

You can use either jack you want For safety sake, don't get under the car unless you have some jackstands. It isn't the jack failing that kills you. It's the fact that you only used a jack and didn't have any backup. You NEVER use a jack alone if you are getting underneath the car. You ONLY use a jack to change a tire on the side of the road and you ...


31

Yes, but personally, I wouldn't risk it. The only time I've ever needed my spare was [cue spooky music] on a dark, stormy night, on a two lane highway through a dense forest. I was doing ~50 mph when I hit a pothole with front passenger tire. The tire didn't go flat immediately, but I could tell something was wrong, and was able to limp another 1/4ish mile ...


28

Is it magnetic? if so, a big magnet (from a speaker for example) might help...


22

You take 2 nuts and put them on the same set of threads. Then lock them against each other by loosening the lower nut and tightening the upper nut. Then use the upper nut with your torque wrench to install the stud.


21

Do you carry a toolset, lights, spare belts and hoses, and OBD-II decoder and electrical patch cables? If not, then you're not taking on much more risk by leaving the spare at home, provided you keep an eye on tire pressure, you drive on ordinary roads, and your tires are nowhere near their end of life. Spare tires are common because, for most of the 20th ...


18

The damage you are showing is minor cosmetic damage. If the following occurs with sidewall damage, then get it replaced: Tire deflation (cannot be legally repaired in most countries) You pull the flap back and see damage to the side wall plies (corded area under the rubber which supports the tire) whether deflation has occurred or not Bulging of the tire ...


18

If the trunk was overfilled and had to be pushed closed, you might have success with pushing down on the trunk (with as much force as you safely can) while trying to operate the mechanism. If a force inside the trunk is pushing up, the mechanism could be in a bind. You pushing down will hopefully counteract that force enough to free up the lock.


18

These are some general guidelines when working with electricity on vehicles: Always remove any jewelry, to include rings, necklaces, watches, etc. If one of these items should come in contact between a hot and ground, it will instantly go hot (if there's enough amperage flow) and will burn into your skin requiring surgery to remove. These are a "no matter ...


16

If the area you lost it in isn't too large, you could shovel the snow into a big bucket, bring it inside, and let it melt. This could be tricky if the area you might have lost it is large, or if the snow is deep. Any other way of melting the snow in place would also work if you have a portable source of heat. If you're in no rush, just wait until spring!


15

Even if the seat does not fold down, you can unbolt it. Remove the bottom part first, then the back. This happened in my mother's Camry several times(bad latch mechanism) and I had to remove the seat each time.


14

Caveat: this is your vehicle. Please consider our opinions as such and make the best decision that you can. Here is how I would group things without considering price. I'll try to be guided by your "about five more years" and your climate (assuming that NE Ohio is roughly equivalent to central Indiana <- where I spent six years of graduate school). ...


14

If the site of the tragedy is such that you can easily acquire water, use a hose (or a bucket) and simply run/pour water over the area to melt the snow. Since snow is an insulator, running a propane torch will be an exercise in patience (and an exercise in buying a bunch of propane). Water is cheap, melts snow faster, and is less likely to burn your house ...


13

Fixing a bent motorcycle wheel is situational. If you are on a 125 to 200cc motorcycle using it for commuting purpose and will be driving under the speed limit, I would not be worried and its absolutely fine to reuse a bent wheel. provided the bend was minimal , if its extensive then changing would be a wiser option. If you are on a 600 to 1000cc super ...


12

No, it cannot. In fact, in the United States it is illegal for a tire shop to repair a tire which has side wall damage. The reason for this is because the integrity of the tire itself is compromised with side wall damage. Now, I'm not saying it could not be fixed per se (a simple patch could probably do it), but would you want to risk your safety or that of ...


12

Yes, wheel chocks would help in this case. Also, use of the emergency brakes as well as leaving it in gear (EDIT- Leave it in gear if a manual or park if automatic). If wheel chocks are not available, you could use a largish stone which could be wedged between the tire and the ground on both sides of the tire. This would be on a tire which is not flat and ...


12

Your suggestion may work for a short period of time, but this is not the way to permanently fix your ceiling. Your head liner is made with a semi-sturdy backing which has foamed-fabric attached to it. What is happening in your case is the fabric is separating from the foam itself. This happens as the foam starts to deteriorate. Putting adhesive onto the ...


12

No, they're not. My first flat ever shredded the tire before I could bring the vehicle to a stop. Those things could save you hundreds of dollars but leave you stranded where there is no help when you need it most.


12

Not sure how things work were you are. Here if you are rear ended, it is considered to be the fault of the person who hit you, so their insurance will pay for the damage. If this is the case, you might as well take it to a shop and have them take a look at it. I work on all my own cars, and don't like taking my cars to shops. I've been in several ...


12

It is typically faster, easier, and more reliable to replace a bad part with a new part. The dealership wants to the vehicle to leave the shop in the best possible condition that they can guarantee is going to work and last. The best way to do this is to replace a bad part with a new part. They prefer not to repair parts, because a repaired part will ...


11

These ways to repair tires can work - the air pressure inside the tire does hold the patch to the body of the tire - but the question you want to ask yourself is: Are you willing to trust your life to a weaker tire when a small amount of money will get you a brand new tire? I would always go with the new tire if I have had a puncture on my motorbike - the ...


11

MAJOR UPDATE - TOYOTA WARRANTY EXTENSION FOR "STICKY DASHBOARDS" Today ( 12/29/2014 ) I received in the mail a Warranty Enhancement Notification regarding my Toyota. Complete coincidence that I received this a few weeks after I posted the original question. A relevant December 18th, 2014 article from a consumer investigator regarding this issue. ...


11

Install a metal detector app on your phone. Seriously. They work pretty well.


10

This is not normal behavior of a typical mechanic. Most mechanics/shops will still continue to charge their normal hourly rate no matter if you bring in the parts or if they get you the parts. The only difference is, they will not warrant the parts you bring in. You may want to look at the fine print of why they are charging the extra $15/hr. If the reason ...


10

As @SteveMatthews points out in the comments, it depends on the make/model of the car. To answer your question outright, though, you cannot just "add" another gear. A transmission in most cases are built as they are built. You wouldn't be able to just "add" in another gear, because there's not space to put it in there. They aren't designed to have more gears....


9

Well, if you fail to put it back together properly (even something as simple as reusing a non-reusable part or messing up on a torque/bolt-stretch calculation/install), you can cause a failure (possibly immediate, possibly some time down the road) that will destroy the engine. If you're OK with that, it would be a wonderful learning experience. However, if ...


8

After protecting the windows in painters tape and newspaper, I used the spray adhesive in late December 2014. It is September 2015, and the problem has not yet resurfaced. Paulster's answer is a bit more comprehensive and advises against this course of action, so I selected it, but will update with progress for as long as I own the car. UPDATE - December ...


8

My suggestion would be to buy a differential bearing and seal kit for the rear end yourself and have a knowledgeable mechanic install it for you. This, as the name implies, consists of bearings and seals. A master kit will have the shims in it as well, but when you are just doing bearings in the diff, you can usually put the old shims back in to get ...


8

When you are traveling 20-30 mph, shift into high gear (6th IIRC) and push the gas 1/2 to 3/4 of the way down. If you see the RPM rise with no immediate increase in speed, the clutch is worn to the point that it is slipping. The amount of time between slight slippage and total failure is usually not very long. For a higher power car, you can expect to ...


8

I'd look at it in this lineup in order of precedence: Take it to a shop and have them put a patch on the hole from the inside of the tire. Pro: Best permanent fix Con: More expensive (sans replacement) Use a rubber rope patch fix. Pro: Easy to do at home; cheap Con: Could possibly pull out over time (though I've never personally experienced it) Fix-a-...


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