69

Engine oil does much more for an engine than lubricate. It provides cooling, cleaning, and a bunch of other chores. You already know engine function is degraded when you run out of oil. Let's see if we can run it down to make more sense for you how it happens. Let's say, for lack of argument, your engine is running with very little to no oil. The engine ...


43

There is no correct answer to this. It is only a matter of preference that will give you peace of mind. Since the car is not being driven, the oil change can happen at either point. You will see no added benefit either way. While it sits for 3 weeks, the old oil will not become bad or damage anything. Changing it before you leave will just be one less ...


38

Change it after, especially if you are having the oil filter changed at the same time (which is often recommended.) It is always possible that the mechanic will carry out the job incorrectly, and fail to replace the plug or filter properly. The filter gasket is quite large. The chances of a problem are low but I wouldn't leave a vehicle (or a house) alone ...


35

The 1000 mile oil change is a holdover from days of yore. It falls into the "my grandfather /father (add appropriate generation) said you should always"... Add what ever urban myth was part of the lesson. Part of the reasoning was due to the Moly-Lube that was part of the engine assembly process. The theory was that the assembly lube was thick enough to clog ...


29

I personally dropped all the oil and coolant from a Rover K-series engine (in a scrap car) and the engine took a good twenty minutes of very hard abuse (redlining / rev limiter / dumping the clutch in 1st) before expiring. That said, it may have cause a significant amount of wear which may not show itself for several thousand miles. If the car was driven ...


28

... and screw it in by hand, maybe a couple of twists with an oil filter strap wrench. Don't over-tighten it. Tighten it by hand then at most about a quarter turn with a strap wrench or by hand (definitely not a couple twists!) A good indicator is if you can unscrew your new filter by hand with just a minimal amount of initial strength. Go for this when ...


27

I would not start an engine that has the oil overfilled by a gallon. You can cause permanent engine damage by significantly overfilling the engine with oil. If the crankshaft and connecting rods are contacting the oil, they will whip air into it and cause it to foam. This happens when the oil level is too high. Foamy oil may still work as a barrier ...


23

If you want to know what to use for your car, follow what your vehicle manufacturer has stated. If you would like to better understand what all the gobble-de-gook means, continue reading --- Oil Originally there was crude oil. Black gold. Texas Tea. As crude oil, it is fairly much useless. It's the distillates which make up the usable parts. Crude oil is ...


21

The benefits of changing it hot are the that oil is less viscous, so it flows better, allowing more of the old oil to drain. It will also drain more quickly. I know when I do mine, I let the engine warm up, but not to full operating temperature. Even through latex gloves, full temp oil would burn my hand, and I can do without that. And getting it at least ...


19

First, document everything as accurately as possible. Write down every step and keep every single piece of correspondence with V-Oil and their employees. Write down exactly the steps you took from soon as you left the oil change place. I would try to get a confession of an employee or from the manager that they acknowledge they did not put oil in the car. If ...


18

In most engines, when you fill the oil, it drains into a reservoir on the bottom of the engine known as the oil pan. The tube for the dipstick goes right down into this reservoir to measure the level of the oil. The other important item located in this reservoir is the pick-up tube for the oil pump. As long as the pick-up tube for the pump stays under the ...


18

With way too much engine oil in the engine, the problem is that the crankshaft can hit the oil in the bottom of the crankcase when the engine is running. Since the crankshaft is spinning fast, even at idle, each time it slaps the surface of the oil, it will create some bubbles in the oil as the air just behind the spinning crankshaft lobe gets dragged under ...


18

Do what it says in the owner's manual. FWIW the manual said the first oil change from new on my current car was at 18,000 miles, not 1,000. I queried that with the dealer and the reply was "yes, that's correct." Nothing bad has happened after 100,000 miles (and it still only burns half a liter of oil in the 18,000 miles between changes, just like it did ...


17

It's a Diesel, which means that you usually have a high detergent oil in an engine that dumps combustion by-products like soot into the oil as part of its normal operation. Given the age of the vehicle I'm not surprised that the oil has noticeably darkened after 10 miles - one of the older Diesels I owned a while back did that during the time it took to run ...


16

In addition to keeping the recommended oil change schedule, here's a quick-and-dirty way to evaluate oil quality. Grab the dip stick and run it through your fingers to get them oily. Spread the oil on your fingers and observe: Transparent, honey-like colour, no visible sediments, nice greasy feeling? You are good to go. Transparent, dark-brown to black, no ...


16

In a word: No. To add more to it: Absolutely Not. There is one huge thing which you have not taken into account. That being carbon which deposits from the air/fuel mixture burning process. Where does it go? Right into the oil (among other places). A small amount of blow by occurs which also forces this mixture down into the crank case. Now you have it in ...


16

It sounds like the engine has suffered severe internal damage. You would only get away with running a vehicle with no oil for a few minutes assuming there is a residual amount left in the sump and coating on all the components. But running it for over 100 miles with what would be left in the sump and oil gallery's after draining it will only cause severe ...


15

Oil filter strap wrenches are made to remove filters, not put them on. Oil filters should be made finger-tight, not hand-tight and certainly not wrench-tight. The filter will go through expansion-contraction cycles with the heat from the engine, it will tighten itself up, as you've testified to. If you only make it finger-tight when you install them, you ...


14

Simple answer - no, you can never get rid of ALL of the old oil - and you wouldn't want to, as you need to keep a film of oil over all the moving parts all the time. The small amount of residual oil will mix with the new oil quite happily. Oil flows better when it is warmer (as it gets thinner), so the best way to get as much of the sludge and residue out ...


14

Here's a "tip to make sure I got everything right" for the future. One that I use myself, and taught my Auto Tech students as well: The very first thing is to take off the oil cap, and place it over the latch area for the hood, such that you can't close the hood unless you move the cap. This prevents the worst possible thing: finishing the job but ...


13

If the oil is unused, and unopened, there is nothing wrong with using it. ExxonMobil recommends a five-year maximum shelf life for engine oils, including Mobil 1™ synthetic motor oil. Opened oil can vary in shelf life due to extreme temperature, humidity and other conditions like dusty environments. These things will shorten the life.


12

I suspect that the 15% oil is talking about oil life. Just make sure that you check the oil level and top it off appropriately before taking the trip. Change the oil a quickly as possible once the trip is done.


12

Recycle it. Don't use it for anything, it's an environmental hazard. Just get rid of it in the least impactful way. Used motor oil has a plethora of bad chemicals and compounds in it that eliminate for another use once it has been inside your engine for an extended period of time. Aside from the hydrocarbons there is lead, phosphorous, berium, zinc, ...


12

I think Meineke was taking you for a ride (pun intended). Here is my reasoning: If it was leaking as bad as they say (or showed you) it was, you wouldn't have had any oil in your vehicle when you got to their shop. If the car was having the massive oil leaks all over the engine compartment as they showed you, there would have been VOLUMES of smoke from it ...


11

Yes, as Charlie says, as long as it has been stored correctly it should be fine. I generally use the leftovers from one change when I do the next so that it's not sitting around for too long - e.g. if I need 4L and I have 5L cans, I'll have 1L left, so next time I'll use that 1L, plus 3L from the next can.


11

Short answer .... NO !! Now this is one of those seriously contentious topics that people will chime in from all walks of life, experience, and voodoo. I will speak [yell] my piece, and put on my Nomex undies: Oil goes "bad" from two things: The long chains get broken down due to wear. But ask any tribologist with an ounce of morals, and they will ...


10

This be what the internet gives me. I have never owned a BMW but I hope this helps. In the picture look for the red arrow and on your car look on the left rear side of the engine.


10

Mixing new with the old will cause you absolutely no issues. As long as you are using the same weight oil, it will mix up and you'd never know it. Continue to change your oil at the specified interval and you should be golden.


10

I believe you just dripped some oil on your exhaust when drained it, don't worry, and your "paranoid" stuff is good - it means you care. Good job Snake! ;)


10

Old oil isn't poison to your engine or to the new motor oil you are putting in. When you are doing an oil change, whatever old oil is left behind (along with the particulates floating around) will get diluted into the new oil. The less old oil there is the better, of course. Most oil pans are designed to hold onto a little bit of old oil. If you look at ...


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