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11

Since you lost power to your 12v accessory socket at the same time as the other systems, I can’t see this as being an computer malfunction. This sounds to me like you have a fault in your main fuse box which is taking out a number of circuits. There may be a bad connection of one of the main fusible links. Unbolting them and cleaning may fix it. You may ...


5

I have fitted many accessories to cars, trucks and agricultural vehicles, some taking less than 1 amp and others several hundred or more. I have never put fuses on the earth or ground side. If the ground side fuse breaks then the device may actually cause more damage to itself or other items as it "finds" an alternate path to ground.


4

If the machine is still under warranty, take it back to the dealer and have them fix it. That's what the warranty is for, and it's their obligation to do so. New vehicle warranties come from the manufacturer, not from the dealer. If multiple dealers are available to you, you might take it to another dealer rather than the one whose "fix" was unavailing.


3

You may have a loose or corroded engine ground connection. The next time you have the electrical failure, leave the ignition switch ON and, using a voltmeter, measure voltage between the negative post on the battery and any shiny clean metal part that is bolted to the engine block. This should always read zero volts, or nearly zero. If it reads something ...


2

The basic purpose of fuses is to protect the wiring, not the equipment. The radio itself should be protected internally against anything you can connect it to (within reason). Electrical wiring can fail either open circuit or closed circuit (e.g. wires chafing on sharp edges may cut through the insulation). The purpose of a fuse in the negative wiring is ...


2

You are getting no power at all do any of your accessories and relays etc (based on your description of no sounds at all). This could be caused by some of the following (not an exhaustive list): Battery, the battery has failed and is unable to output power (you indicate yours is fine) Connection issue, a connection has failed somewhere preventing the ...


2

Another reason for burnt connectors could be from cargo or passengers sitting in the back seat on the driver's side. The weight on the seat cracks the plastic fuel pump cover and wiggles the connector causing the pins to heat up. If left too long, the pins will melt the plastic around them causing gas to leak through the connector. This happened to me ...


2

Welcome to the site, and thanks for putting in a good amount of details. The fact that you have replaced the battery and your seat motors still work when you have the issue eliminates a bad battery or main battery connection. The symptoms sound a lot like a computer issue to me because the computers control the dash lights, ignition, either the computer isn'...


2

You may just have a bad connection on the battery posts. This would account for the sudden loss of power and also explain why everything powered up once the jump leads were added. Try disconnecting the battery connections and cleaning the connectors and battery post with some sand paper or wire wool, then reconnect. The reason why the car would not start ...


1

I had a similar problem with my car late last year. The car will go totally off and few minutes later turn-on the dashboard again. After few days of struggle and investigation asking battery guys and electricians for help, I discovered that the cables to the battery terminal were loose. The problem totally went away after tightening them. Hope this helps...


1

I have no idea of where in the car to look for it but this sort of behavior sounds thermal to me. Something delivers power when it's cool but goes open circuit when it's hot. A couple of thoughts on this, I don't know how practical given the situation: 1) When it's failing look over the circuit with a multimeter. I would connect the leads together ...


1

Impossible to say without knowing exactly how many amps those four accessories draw, and also remember that you need to have sufficient juice left in the battery to crank the engine if you're planning on starting the car again without jumping... But just for fun, let's say your draw is something like this: radio: 2 A blower fan: 4 A dome light: 500 mA one ...


1

I would disconnect the supply to the coil, but it does depend on which coil / ignition system is fitted. If it is the older type non electronic then it will be fine. However any of the electronic types can suffer damage sometimes but not always. After building an engine I would spin it without plugs and the coil disconnected to get the oil circulated and ...


1

A quick way would be to install an inline fuseholder and connect it to the hot side of an existing "Hot on run" fuse.


1

Easiest way to do what your asking is use a digital multi-meter in continuity mode but first you want see which side of the fuse is connected to the supply so set your meter to DC and remove the fuse, turn your ignition on and check voltage at the fuse terminals. Which ever side of the terminals read 12V is your supply, next for simplicity, remove the SJB (...


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