Hot answers tagged

38

It depends on the specific vehicle. Many modern standard transmission cars in the US have a clutch pedal sensor that will not allow you to start the vehicle if the pedal isn't fully depressed. You'll turn the key and nothing will happen. I've had older vehicles that preceded this sensor that could move the vehicle if the clutch was engaged and the ...


25

Being from Canada, I feel compelled to mention that if you do not depress the clutch while starting when it is at all cold out (let's say < 0 Celsius) you will notice the starter motor labouring significantly as it spins both the cold engine and the cold transmission. If it is really cold, your battery may not have enough power to start the car at all in ...


23

Is it ok to give gas while releasing the clutch? Yes, but your goal is to give exactly the right amount of gas. The thing to remember is that the clutch is a consumable part (it's really a whole system of parts that can be consumed but let's pretend that it's a single unique piece for the sake of discussion). As such, it has a finite supply of work that ...


22

Holding the clutch in is generally not a good idea. The clutch is designed to be used for very short periods between gears, and for holding in first when you are about to pull away. So if you are wanting to coast you should definitely do it in neutral. The difference between these two from a fuel consumption perspective should be marginal. From a safety ...


22

You can do this if your engine RPM, the speed of the vehicle, and the gear you are shifting to/from is just right. The reason you can do this is because you have synchros in the transmission which allows the two gears to match rotational speeds as they come in contact (basically, there is more to it than this, but hopefully you get the drift). The synchros ...


21

It absolutely does. It's called riding the clutch. Even though you "believe" you just have your foot there, it forces the pedal down and takes up the slack which is there. This causes the throw out bearing to ride against the clutch fingers, which presses so ever slightly and causes the clutch to not have as much grip. This causes the clutch friction disk to ...


20

Using the clutch engagement to turn the vehicle off can definitely hurt the car. Essentially what you're doing is wearing the clutch, bearings that lie within the motor, rings and valve seals. If you can visualize the physics and mechanics of what you're doing, it makes sense. When you let your foot off of the clutch pedal, you're pressing the friction disk ...


19

If it was just once, I wouldn't be overly worried... particularly as you say the car is driving fine. You took a bit of life off your clutch, and I'd keep an eye out for issues in the coming weeks or months with the clutch just to be on the safe side.


15

A flywheel serves four main purposes (in most vehicles): It provides mass for rotational inertia to keep the engine in motion It is specifically weighted to provide balance for the crankshaft It provides a means to get the engine started (starter ring) It provides a connection for power transfer between the engine and transmission (along with the clutch it ...


15

Heel-Toe shifting and clutchless shifting are 2 different things. I guess they can be done together.... The one thing both of these techniques have in common is rev matching. There is the RPM you are at when you come out of a gear, and the RPM you will be at when you go into the next (or previous) gear. When you rev match, you try and have the engine RPM ...


13

Until the engine starts the only thing applying torque to the drive train is the starter motor, the engine itself is not providing any torque. Starting like this will not cause any damage to the drive train (except perhaps the teeth on the edge of the flywheel that the starter motor engages with) but it does put excessive load on the starter motor and it's ...


13

why using your clutch during braking can be considered unsafe I have ridden motorcycles for years. Engine braking is a component of safe riding. The engine itself can be ok and not receive any damage from pulling in the clutch while breaking other than it is additional wear on throw out bearing for the pressure plate within the clutch. The throwout ...


12

You should be pushing the clutch pedal to start the engine no matter what time of year it is. There is a clutch safety switch which needs to be engaged in order for your ignition to work when you turn the key. It can only be engaged when you press down on the clutch pedal. This is to prevent you from trying to start the car while it's in gear. Just a safety ...


12

Newtons Third Law For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. The statement means that in every interaction, there is a pair of forces acting on the two interacting objects. The size of the forces on the first object equals the size of the force on the second object. The lateral center of gravity (CG) is above the axle as well. So you have ...


12

Absolutely not. There's no issue here. The engine/transmission were not coupled. There was no stress on the transmission. It just was running backwards from what it usually would. Really, it's no big deal.


11

A basic clutch is made up of three major parts: Flywheel Friction disk Pressure plate (NOTE: These three pieces do not actually go together. I'm using the pictures for illustrative purposes.) The flywheel is attached to the back of the engine. The pressure plate is attached to the flywheel. Sandwiched in between the two is the friction disk. The ...


10

It sounds like they're trying to take you for a ride to me. I can't see how driving style could cause the slave cylinder to fail - they're separated by a mechanical linkage. I would also dispute that anyone could destroy a clutch with 32k of normal driving - I'd expect it to last at least twice that long. However, a leaking cylinder might cause ...


10

I was always taught to put the car in neutral while waiting at lights. I ruined my throw out bearing by always holding the clutch in. Apparently it was a very difficult replacement because it was a front wheel drive car. The consequences I would receive if a family member saw me idling and holding in the clutch were severe. Don't hold in your clutch at ...


10

This is addition to Paulster's answer. Here's an animation The disc in Grey is the flywheel Wikipedia provides a good general outline - A flywheel is a rotating mechanical device that is used to store rotational energy. ... - Providing continuous energy when the energy source is discontinuous. For example, flywheels are used in reciprocating engines ...


10

No other problem than using slightly too much fuel. The recommended way to brake is to use the current gear and keep the clutch engaged during braking until idling RPMs at what point one presses the clutch to avoid stalling the engine. So: Save some fuel and press the clutch only until idling RPMs, not immediately Don't downshift, that'll wear the ...


9

My choice would depend on the duration of the stop. If you're rolling up to an intersection and see the light change to red knowing you will sit for a full cycle I'd opt for "in neutral foot off the clutch". Pulling up to an already red light I would go for "in gear clutch depressed" as you can figure you'll have a short wait. Having the clutch depressed ...


9

I pulled the following information from this site: Unless you are a professional motorcycle mechanic, you normally can not see whether a motorcycle has a wet or dry clutch just by looking at the bike. But if you know your Italian motorcycles, you probably have a pretty good idea which ones do. A wet clutch is called wet because it is actually wet ...


9

I read on a forum that the issue could be down to certain earth wires. When depressing the clutch pedal, you may be earthing a electrical line going to the sound system which in turn stops the music. There are various earths located in the engine bay. Check around the inner wings etc and make sure all of them are tight.


9

In general, a clutch is a part which allows to connect / disconnect two shafts also while they are rotating. The most simple clutch consists of two discs, each firmly attached to one shaft. Press them together, and the friction between them allows to transfer torque from the one shaft to the other. Pull them apart, and the shafts aren't connected any more, ...


9

I'm going to expand on rpmerf's answer, where he has disambiguated between Heel and toe and clutchless shifting. I'l briefly explain the driving technique only to better illustrate what it hopes to mechanically achieve. And so, please excuse me if get the nuance of the technique wrong. Here's an image of a gearbox. I couldn't find a one with synchromesh, ...


9

So there are several aspects to keep in mind if you use engine braking. No brake lights! Don´t do this when somebody sits at your back! Don´t over-rev. Only downshift to an appropriate gear. Never use force to engage the gear. Downshifting and releasing the clutch when cornering hard can lead to unexpected behavior. You are braking only one axle, you´ll get ...


8

When was the last time the transmission's gear oil was changed? If it has been a while (or never), get it changed. Check your manual for the recommended interval, this is one of the fluids that is often overlooked. If it has never been done on a 2003, it needs to be done.


8

DURING cranking, in Neutral, the car races forward The transmission is not in neutral, no other explanation. Check the shifter linkage, it may be out of adjustment, or bent. Those are the most likely causes IMO based on the fact that you put a clutch in the vehicle and the linkage would have been disconnected and reconnected in that process. The ...


8

As a somewhat paranoid motorcyclist, I'm a huge fan of remaining in first, with the clutch disengaged until at least one vehicle has fully stopped behind me, after that if the remaining stop time is long (frequently it isn't) I may switch to neutral. Until that vehicle has completely stopped, you're at risk of being rear ended by someone failing to stop in ...


8

The most likely cause is a worn or misadjusted clutch. The clutch disc is slipping meaning that all the engine's power is not being transmitted to the transmission. The cost of a clutch replacement is too varied to give an accurate estimate. Clarification Note Energy will always take the path of least resistance. From a clutch's perspective, it is much ...


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