35

I have heard (from an auto store clerk) that running just water will cause overheating. Well, that's not true. Water isn't the cause of overheating. Your coolant mixture (of whatever proportion) and radiator work together to get rid of the heat. If it's not hot, you won't overheat. However, when it is hot, the coolant can only absorb heat up to its ...


31

It isn't something restricted to old vehicles; my Lumina has fans like this, though not as irregular as the picture shown in the question. As far as I can recall, the chief reason cited for this by the manufacturer is noise reduction. You'll notice the additional weight on some of the blades to ensure that rotational balance is maintained despite the ...


24

"Is it safe to continue driving with low coolant as long as I continue to watch the temperature gauge? " No, the temp sensor reads coolant temperature, if the coolant gets low enough to be below the temp sensor, now the sensor is reading metal temperature of the area it is screwed into (usually cylinder head), by the time it reads too hot on the gauge the ...


16

It sounds like the approach to solving your problem so far hasn't been very systematic or "evidence based" – at least the list of parts replaces suggests that the people working on it have been using a "shotgun" approaching, replacing parts in hopes that one (or more) of them will solve the problem. Start off by doing basic checks: Is there hot water ...


14

Number one answer is always Head Gasket. The reason is that there are oil and water passages in close proximity, being separated by a gasket (which might just be flimsy paper or rubber, but is often steel or copper) sandwiched between two pieces of metal with (usually) different thermal expansion rates. This means that any time your engine gets far enough ...


12

If you do not have any leaks, then your coolant is most likely getting burned and/or going into your oil. My guess is going to be a problem with your head gasket or some crack or warping in the head. I believe coolant in oil used to turn oil more brown and make it more foamy or milky. These days, the detergents and dispersants in modern oil can reduce ...


12

Yes what you presume is correct. Depending on total volume of coolant (different for each vehicle) how much pure AF I put in, anywhere from 1/2 to 1 gallon, then top off with 50/50 mix. It is better to be over the 50% mix than under, you can go as high as 70%, so don't worry about putting a little too much pure AF after flushing the cooling system with ...


11

I believe (and this is a gut check) you can chalk this up to deteriorated hoses which all have gone bad in the same period of time (coincidence). Each has probably served a long fruitful life and now it's time for replacement. Especially considering where you live and overheating as well, this does not seem unreasonable to me. I'd suggest if you have any ...


11

The exact time taken depends upon various factors: The ambient temperature The amount of heat insulation in the engine bay Volume of coolant in the engine How hot the engine got while driving material used in construction of the engine block/head (aluminium blocks cool quicker than steel for example) and many more besides. Typically though it should be ...


10

Without water and without antifreeze or just without antifreeze? I'll assume that you mean without either, but there is a big difference. This is really simple though. The engine will overheat, quickly, and the seals and gaskets will give out, letting fluids leak in and out of places they should or shouldn't be (like the radiator and water pump, for ...


10

Failure Modes Mechanical thermostats fail in one of two ways: Stuck-closed The pintle/spring doesn't retract to permit flow at the set-point temperature that is usually stamped on the thermostat itself. which can lead to the engine running at hotter than expected. If hot enough, this can lead to serious issues such as a compromised head gasket or warped ...


10

Remember that the reliability of any system of components will only be as strong as the weakest link. Coolant lines are pressurized under regular operation and the walls of the hoses will weaken with many, many heat cycles. It is expected that a coolant leak will spring at the weakest point of the system. The moment you replace this hose, the weakest point ...


10

First, you do need to find out where the coolant is going. There is UV dye that can help with this, and if your car is smoking, that could be a sign that the coolant is leaking into the engine rather than on the ground. For the main question, "Is it safe", as long as you keep an eye on the temperature and it's not getting too high, you should be OK in the ...


10

The coolant capacity of the 2004 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.8L 4-cyl Engine Code [R] 1ZZ-FE is 6.9 quarts. To accurately ensure you have a 50/50 mix in your system after a flush (assuming you actually flush it until you have clear liquid draining out), is to add 1/2 of the coolant as straight coolant (not 50/50 mix), then fill the rest as distilled water. For ...


10

I am assuming that by cooling you are referring as to which Engine cooling systems are better in particular scenarios... Oil-cooled: Traditional Oil-cooled engines are most commonly found in passenger commuter motorcycles which are usually anywhere between 50cc to 500cc (some sophisticated models have liquid cooled engines as well). The system uses the ...


9

The main ingredient in automotive antifreeze, Ethylene glycol, has a higher boiling point when mixed with water than water alone. Wherever you live, I bet it's not Arizona or Texas. Steam voids suck, you don't want any in your cooling system. Antifreeze also contains corrosion inhibitors. I bet you don't have hard water, either.


9

I agree with Timo - if it is a big enough leak that you can see it clearly, then getting the car transported is much safer. In general, using water as coolant is OK for a short time or as a "get you home" alternative, but it does not have the anti-freeze and corrosion inhibiting properties of a proper coolant mix, so should not be left in the engine for ...


9

First thing I'd try to figure out is how quickly it leaks - run it, stick your head underneath it as check if there is any visible leaking. If there is, chances are that it's not going to make it for 30 miles. I'd also check for any evidence of oil and water mixing. If there is, don't drive it. If it's not leaking that badly I'd be tempted to top it up with ...


9

As explained on this page, using pure antifreeze alone will not do the job: No matter which type or color your antifreeze is, it will transfer heat away most efficiently when blended with the proper amount of water - a mixture percentage based on the lowest temperatures typically seen in your climate. Most regions are best suited to a 50/50 water-...


9

To add to Anarach's answer... There are 4 things around a head gasket - combustion chambers (cylinders), oilways, coolant-ways and the outside air. They can fail between any two (or more) of these, and each has different symptoms. oil-coolant failures will result in one or both being contaminated - look for a mayonnaise-like substance in the oil (though ...


9

You may have developed an air bubble in the system, probably from the reservoir falling off, or from the mechanics not bleeding the cooling system after emptying it. There'll be a pocket of air in the system that's making the car overheat. Does the car lose power when it's overheating?


9

Its not good to run with low coolant, even worse to run with no coolant. Actually it can be quite disastrous (possibilities include blown head gaskets, seized pistons and a number of expensive repairs), but many times this is a result of a leaky radiator cap which is easy (and cheap) to replace. Someone already mentioned the dyes for detecting leaks, but ...


9

You don't need to, but since your coolant system is already drained, it would be a good time to. Standard thermostats are only about $10 and a $2 gasket. Changing your thermostat is typically 2 bolts and a gasket.


9

Hmmm, about the benefits/drawbacks, I first wanted to complain that this stuff only has a heat capacity of 2.6J/(g * K), while water has 4.2J/(g * K). Water has an exceptionally high value, which makes it a great coolant, while other liquids are normally in the range below 2.4J/(g * K). However, water is usually mixed with anti-freeze, a 1:1 mixture has a ...


8

I'm assuming that this person was advocating putting a small amount of dish soap in the water used to do a coolant system flush. I would not do this to my car as routine/preventative maintenance, I would simply use water for a flush. My concern would be that any dish soap residue remaining in the system may adversely affect the chemistry of the coolant, ...


8

The heater core is part of continuous loop of engine coolant propelled via the water pump, flowing through caverns in the engine, through pipes that run through the firewall into the heater core, back out the firewall, and finally through the radiator. If the thermostat dictates it (due to a temperature limit being reached), the fan blows air over the ...


8

Oil Cooled and Water Cooled are terms used by Manufacturer's to differentiate the slight difference between the cooling systems. Note that this is specific to only motorcycles as almost all of the cars and larger automobiles have moved to Water cooling(Explained below) Oil cooling: Technically , An oil cooled engine is predominantly air cooled with ...


8

It is ALWAYS good to get a second opinion. I would highly recommend taking it to another shop and have them tell you what they think it is even if you believe the first shop to be right. That being said, there are a couple of things you can do at home to try and diagnose a head gasket problem yourself. Look to see if white smoke is coming out of the ...


7

Yes, it's possible. Also, the bit you lost that you think may be a leaking pipe is actually being turned to steam and blown out your exhaust. The car runs fine until the engine gets hot enough for the thermostat to open up, at which point exhaust gases are let into the radiator. The details of how/why is a bit long, but this is what happens. How do I know ...


7

I had no idea it would be called this, but the article in Wikipedia describes the "low level" detail of how the device works. Wax thermostatic element Basic operation There is an optimum temperature for the engine coolant (not too cold, not too hot) and a simple mechanical thermostat helps make that happen. When it's closed, the water pump circulates the ...


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