The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Hot answers tagged

38

You stated you had dirt in your wheels from the incident. Two things could be happening to you: You still have dirt in one or more of your wheels causing an imbalance. A simple scrub will take care of the issue. You threw one or more of your wheel weights. These are the things which keep the wheel/tire from vibrating. You'd need to take it to a tire shop to ...


26

Keep the AC system in the car until you are ready to get it repaired. There's a load of parts to an AC system and some of them are hard to access, you are likely to spend much more in labor costs removing and then re-installing the system than any fuel savings from reduced weight.


19

Even though you state that no curb was hit, it could be that you still hit something small while sliding and that could have affected the alignment of the wheels. Or if there really was no obstacle hit, simply switching from the road to dirt at an angle could have been a shock to the wheels. Happened to me once to hydroplane at ~30km/h and hit a side curve ...


12

It's hard to be sure, but that looks like single-stage paint (without a hard-wearing clearcoat). If so, it is relatively soft paint that could easily be scratched. Judging by the angle of attack (and prior knowledge of feline behaviour), I would say that those are scratches made by cats that went into hill-descent-control mode.


11

My experience with cats is that they do enjoy sticking their claws into something soft to sharpen them. Cats will completely destroy furniture this way. The scratches you are showing are on hard metal surfaces, so not likely to be cats sharpening their claws. Also, the pattern of the scratches makes it unlikely that they were left behind by a cat climbing ...


11

The blockage probably isn't in the nozzle, it's right at the inlet of the pump. Some have a screen, many don't. You can wire the pump backwards temporarily, to run the pump in the other direction and hopefully push the blockage out of the pump's inlet. Or put compressed air into the outlet hose of the pump - the hose that leads to the nozzle. You can ...


10

You have severe case of corrosion. The part is called the lower control arm. Its function is to maintain the tire in the correct position. Do not attempt to drive the vehicle. In the best case scenario you will cause more damage, the tire could hit the fender, the axle could separate or you can bend something else. In the worst case you kill someone when ...


9

Typically it's just a pollen filter that's more for occupants comfort. In older cars you would very occasionally get a dead bumble bee through a vent but I'd say that six days unfiltered shouldn't cause much of a problem for you.


9

I believe your Elantra has a switch under the hood which detects if it is latched or not. All of the doors, trunk lid/rear hatch, and hood must be closed or the "beep" will not occur. Since you stated the hood was somewhat smashed, it may not be "closing" the switch telling it the hood is down. In other words, your car's security system may be operating ...


8

From the owners manual. Alarm Stage The alarm will be activated if any of the following occurs while the car is parked and the system is armed. A front or rear door is opened without using the transmitter or the ignition key. The trunk lid or tail gate is opened without using the transmitter or the ignition key. The hood is opened. ...


8

This requires a bit of mechanical know-how and some time... An O2 sensor can be tested with a multimeter that measures millivolts. You'll need to securely attach one lead to the signal wire of the sensor and the other to a good ground on the car. This all has to stay in place with the car running... Fire up the engine and look at the voltage reading of ...


8

Sliding sideways into the dirt on the shoulder could cause a bent rim. I would have suspected you would be more likely to feel that at about 45mph but if the bend is relatively light, this could be the cause. Taking the car in for re-balancing would likely find the problem quickly.


8

Short answer - no. It's perfectly okay. And , it's also perfectly okay to be annoyed. It's one of those things mechanics like to do (no offence to anyone). Similar to endlessly hitting refresh on a windows machine. Your car, as do most modern cars, has a rev-limiter and unless you've crossed that by downshifting, there's no need to be worried. Please ...


8

I suspect a 96bhp 1.4 engine would struggle to provide enough power to spin up a supercharger and two turbochargers. I also suspect that the charging units you have chosen would not be well matched to your engine. Might I suggest obtaining something like an IHI from a Lancia Y10 Turbo, a G40 G-ladder from a VW Polo 1.3 G40 or a Garret from an MG Metro ...


7

The sensor should not cause the engine to stall. All of the accessories not working (power steering and brakes) would be normal with a stalled engine. What I would be looking at is the fuel pump might be going bad. A mechanic can easily check this by placing a fuel pressure sensor on the fuel line to check the pressure. If the engine is losing fuel pressure, ...


7

tl;dr: Steering feedback means different things to different people. Ultimately, however, it's about using the steering wheel as both an input and an output device. At a very high level, the concept of steering feedback has to do with the user interface of the car. If we restrict the discussion to just the wheel in front of you, it's easy to imagine that ...


7

Seems a horn was damaged. Some cars use the vehicle's horn to "beep" as a response. Others use a separate horn. Pop the hood and look in the front grille area. Use the diagram below to guide you. Do the following: Check the horn connector. Is it fully connected? Is the horn connector broken? Is the horn itself broken? A smashed horn might still work at ...


7

it sounds like valves Your valves are at the top of the motor under the black cover. They are reciprocating devices, they move in and out and are operated by a camshaft that is spinning at half the RPM of the crankshaft. As your cam rides on top of a tappet or 'bucket' the clearance between the cam and the tappet/bucket can increase or decrease over time. ...


7

While @DucatiKiller is most likely correct, there is another possible reason for this noise, that being a leaking exhaust manifold. If the exhaust manifold is leaking at the head, it will make an almost indistinguishable noise from that of the tappets. It too rises and falls with engine RPM, just like tappet noise. It comes from the same basic location (head ...


7

Getting them to break loose is the biggest challenge. I use a good penetrate, soak them several times over 3-4 days, use high quality brake line wrenches to turn the nuts to prevent rounding the brake line nuts, as they are soft steel. Cheap brake line wrenches will round the nuts, buy good quality wrenches of the proper size, metric or american. Use a ...


6

The lifespan of a replaced waterpump will vary with quality. You have no way of knowing what type of pump you paid for. Was it a factory new pump, an aftermarket new pump, rebuilt pump or remanufactured pump. Factory pump is an exact replacement of what the car came with High quality new aftermarket pump may include improvements to the original design Low ...


6

The injectors you have shown in your pictures are not servicable items. They can be tested using the appropriate service machinery. You should be able to get a new set of external seals though. When tested professionally they are tested for their electrical performance, delivery performance, and spray pattern over varying fuel pressures and voltages. ...


6

You have a couple of choices here, neither of which includes you cleaning these yourself. You do not have the equipment or chemicals to correctly or efficiently clean and flow test these injectors. It is important to ensure each of the injectors flows the same amount of fuel in a given time at a specified fuel pressure. Only a professional service can ...


6

Combustion Chemistry from Princeton This isn't much of an answer but here is some data from a Princeton class related to Combustion Chemistry. You will see that the table you are looking for is plotted. Here is the link to the PDF. Manufacturers of Emission Controls Association Here is a study from Manufacturers of Emission Controls Association. ...


6

The Purge is controlled by the PCM with a pulse width modulated switch signal. It is normal for it to cycle rapidly. This allows small amounts of the fuel vapor to be metered into the cylinders. This method allows the system maintain fuel control. One of the main jobs of the evaporative control system purge valve is to maintain a slight negative pressure ...


6

Don't rip it out. In addition to what GdD said, some parts of the system, particularly the evaporator core, likely make up part of the seal between the engine compartment and the heating/AC ductwork. If you remove that you will have some work to do to ensure that you're not pulling fumes in to the cabin.


5

Quite the list you have there. I'm not sure about some of the issues but, maybe this will give you someplace to start. In general, the car doesn't have as much power as it did before. Turning on the AC makes takes an even bigger chunk out of the power, but it seems like to a large extent than other cars I have driven. The car will regularly idle ...


5

I fixed a 1998 Ford Contour that wouldn't start after sitting for a while in cold weather. The problem was a corroded ground connector in the wiring at the fuel pump. A couple years later, it was left sitting again, and sure enough, it wouldn't start. Same problem, same fix. It can happen, though I'm not sure I would have believed it if I hadn't seen it ...


5

As a general rule, high pressure hoses will have crimped connections on them. The small clamp connectors are on the pump feed and return hoses, which are low pressure lines. They typically don't leak as often as the high pressure ones do. The high pressure line, according to the diagram you posted, comes from the PS pump and enters the rack. There is a ...


5

If you got a low point discharge, your battery is damaged. Some chemical processes can not be reconverted from that point. If you drive around for some time, your battery will get warm and have a little bit more charge then cold. That could be enough to start the car once again. You don't loose anything if you try to charge you battery. Maybe you are lucky. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible