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11

Sounds to me like the plug is still in the head as normal, just with the porcelain and electrode snapped on the top end (where the ignition line attaches). If that's the case, it should be really easy to handle, you just need the exact right tool. You may need to take the manifold off to open up your workspace, but you should be able to access it with a ...


7

As you know, the rear shocks are McPherson struts. There aren't a lot of options to lift a car with a suspension like that. At least not economically. Most obvious, would be replacing the springs with new ones. This may give you some extra ride height, as the original ones are likely sagging and the progressive resistance has diminished some.


6

I'm not positive, but it looks like a vent actuator. In most older vehicles there were manual vents down in the foot well area of the passenger cabin. You'd have to reach down to actuate it by pulling/pushing a knob. Since Buick's were a little more on the "high end" of the car food chain, they would have such controls at easier access to the driver (...


6

The torque mount is fairly important. It keeps everything in place when the engine is trying to torque over from either a launch or a stop. While this one isn't completely shot, it needs to be replaced before that happens, so as to not cause issues in other areas of the vehicle. It will eventually affect the other motor mounts (because they have to do the ...


6

It possible that could be air still in the system. In general if it's air you should be able to pump the pedal and have it come up and be firm and hold that level. Air compresses while the brake fluid does not. If you allowed the fluid level in the master cylinder to drop to the point it could draw air in you may have air trapped in the ABS unit. ...


6

Especially given that you live in Florida, 10W-30 vs 5W-30 is not an issue at all. Sometimes thicker oil is even recommended in higher mileage engines, although I believe the jury is still out on it. If you lived in Siberia, I would be a bit more concerned about it. However, the coolant in the oil definitly needs to be addressed. If it gums up your oil ...


5

Use a coolant flush kit You can add a 'T' to one of your radiator hoses that allow you attach a garden hose to your cooling system. Once you have added the 'T' to your system you can run your car and the garden hose simultaneously in order to fully circulate the fluid in your cooling system as well as flush out all of the contents of the system to ensure ...


5

If the electrode pulled out of the plug you may be able to use an epoxy to pull out the rest of the porcelain. If not you'd have to smash it and get it out of the ground strap. Then you may be able to use an extractor kit on the ground strap. I'm pretty sure you don't have to pull the engine to remove the head. But the lower intake etc... would have to ...


5

There are reasons you'll find the price disparity between what you'll find online or at the parts store versus what a shop will charge you for the same part. (I'll give you an anecdote after I answer this.) Most non-dealer shops buy there parts as cheap as they can get them. They may have a deal with a parts store to get a discount on parts if they buy ...


4

I found what was causing the noise. There is a small metal plate, roughly sized and shaped like a one of those little wooden ice cream spoons that come with a Dixie cup. It is positioned suspending from the bottom of the hub parallel to the back of the rotor. On both sides of the car it was touching the rotor causing the noise. On the driver side the front ...


4

Flush it out with a hose (ordinary garden hose will do fine), backwards - so that the water flows though in the opposite direction to which it would do in normal operation. Generally they flow from top to bottom, so you want to flush it from bottom to top - it's often easiest to take the rad out and turn it upside-down for this. Keep going until the water ...


4

To handle this I would advise you to take it to have the airbag system scanned to see if a trouble code exists. For us to simply just tell you what the issue is we are going to need more information, such as: Have you experienced a wreck recently? Have you done any adjustments to the steering wheel? Have you spun the steering wheel? Have you examined the ...


4

According to this Delaware DMV page, the parking brake must stop a vehicle in 54 feet from 20 mph. For reference, the foot brake has to stop the car in 20' from the same speed. It doesn't sound like you're registering the car as an antique/collector, but if you do, you only have to pass the inspection once. As for checking the function of the brake, I ...


4

I appears you need a G3.5 or G3 1/2 bulb with a bayonet base. It is also referred to as a mini indicator bulb. Looking on amazon, there are still some companies that make them. If you want to go to the parts store (or radio shack) and look, your specs are: ~3/8" diameter base ~15/16" length bayonet base 10 pack on amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Eiko-...


4

With temperatures going down to 20F a 10W oil will not be an issue. Should you be faced with that kind of "extreme" cold you can just let your car warm up for 30 to 60 seconds before you start rolling. There is a small benefit of using a 10W instead of a 5W oil in that the 10W will normally have less viscosity improvers in it. Viscosity improvers help the ...


4

It's a Nash; compare the lettering on the car's trunk logo with this better example from the Wikipedia page on Nash:


3

There is a kit that contains a new sending unit, float and seal. It retails for 239.20 according to gmpartsdirect.com, they will sell it to you for $124.38. There should be an access panel in the trunk under the mat, so dropping the tank should not be necessary. Expect a shop to bill retail for the part plus an hour of labor. You can probably do this ...


3

If you have access to the nuts on threaded studs, you can use a nut splitter to get the nuts off. Then you can clean up the threads, and you might have access to the blind side of the mounting point.


3

I assume that at this point you've already figured it out, or gone another route. Buuut for anybody that's still interested, this will work as described in this photo from above: The negative outputs (blue and green) are simply connected to ground when the corresponding relay (unlock and lock) inside the remote start is activated. The unit labeled "...


3

According to the 2001 Buick Regal service manual (PDF) spark plugs wires should be inspected at 100K miles, and replaced if necessary (p. 7-15).


3

I have the service manual for the 93 Buick and you have to grind the old studs out and put a small stud in for replacement or remove the hub. You can not install the regular size stud without removing the hub!


3

Actually maybe I will attempt to answer this. This is my theory, note I am a consumer, not a seller / mechanic. I've just seen a similar pattern with my own vehicle (2001, Honda). I think a few factors come into play here: OEM vs non-OEM parts: Equivalent parts manufactured by third-parties tend to be less expensive (for example, and also here). Price ...


3

I'm not finding the part you're looking for, so I bet it'd be a tough replacement. Looking at it, there are a couple of options for you. First, you can buy two single sided connectors, like this: Using two of them, you can place it onto your sensor and connect it to the existing wiring harness. You could always dismantle these by taking the contacts out ...


3

The shiny plastic part of the lock lever is attached by a clip onto a metal rod that continues into the door panel and connects to the locking mechanism. The shiny plastic knob must be removed in order to pull away the faux woodgrain plastic panel that surrounds the door handle and lock lever. The plastic part of the lock lever can be removed by working ...


3

That is a PVC valve hose assembly. They are inexpensive (less than $10 in my area) and fairly straight forward to replace. This connects the PCV valve to the manifold (the connector you pointed out) and also continues back to a vacuum manifold behind the engine. Had to replace this on my daughter's car that has the same engine. The connectors were dried ...


3

If i remember right there is a vacuum solenoid box under the dash on the passenger side, they are notorious for the hoses and connectors inside the box to disintegrate, you can open the box and re plumb it. You can follow the vacuum lines as all the actuator lines go into it. Be sure to take a picture of the inside before you start repairs. First check the ...


3

According to rockauto.com, your drain plug should be an M12x1.75 with a 15mm head. If a 15mm wrench is not fitting onto it, get a new drain plug, then get the old one off using whatever method which will work (short of breaking something you still need!). Using a pair of finely tuned Vise-Grips should most likely do the trick. You might also try a 15mm 6-...


3

You check engine oil with the engine OFF. Preferably at least about a minute or so after running. Hot or cold engine doesn't matter. Pull the stick out, wipe it, put it back, pull again and read.


2

SOLUTION: As is turns out, I was not connected to the VATS resistor value/ground reference wires at all. The PLJX instructions SUCK and give almost no info on VATS systems while everything is written up more for the older Passlock I and II systems. I had followed the instructions as spot-on as I could and found the yellow/black/green wire that was inside a ...


2

I know some of the older GM V-6's had issues with the throttle plate binding in the throttle body. Try to locate the throttle body. It can found by following the large plastic hose attached to the air cleaner box. If you remove the hose you may be able to see some carbon build up. Get a can of throttle cleaner at the local autoparts store and follow the ...


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