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17

While i'm not sure if there are mechanical tachometers like speedometers electronic tachometers are quite simple. An electronic tachometer works like an old analog volt meter. The speed of the engine is converted to a voltage. The voltage is fed to the moving coil. The coil creates a magnetic field. That field of the coil tries to align itself with the ...


13

Figured out it (thanks to a shove in the right direction by @mikes): It's the remote engine start accessory's antenna. I didn't think of it when I was asked if I had "add-ons" because it's an official Honda accessory (that I can't do without!) installed by the dealer before taking delivery. Specifically, see this exploded diagram part #4: I went back to ...


9

When I looked online, here's what I found about the location of the MAP sensor in your car. As always, a picture is worth a thousand words: From looking at other info about that car it's port injected, not throttle body injected (individual injectors on each cylinder, not just one on the throttle body). As far as I know there should never be fuel in that ...


8

Here's a rough approach that should work regardless of vehicle You will need to know the current brake pad thickness the thickness of a brand new brake pad how much mileage you've put on the car since the last brake pad change. The formula Mileage per mm = mileage since last brake change / ( brand new thickness - present thickness ) In ...


8

Unfortunately there is no "one-size-fits-all" recipe, but here are some general guidelines: Half the battle is in understanding how it disconnects The chances of me damaging a connector due to ignorance is far higher than damage resulting from old age. Ask me how I know. Have some flathead screwdrivers handy It helps to have various shapes and sizes since ...


7

It might seem easy to integrate a sensor that detects the opening/closing of a mechanical thermostat's pintle (LVDT, for example) but here are some challenges which would need to be addressed: Cost vs Benefit Is a "smart" thermostat really worth the extra hassle and money when its dumb counterpart has the following to offer? : it's already cost-effective ...


7

You need Spark, Fuel, and Compression for an engine to run. Since this engine was just reassembled, there is a lot to question. Spark - rotor position - beware of caps where the points are not "straight through" plug wires in the correct position timing - may need play with it a bit coil - ensure it is firing spark plug firing - use a jumper to connect ...


6

There is a distinction that needs to be made between: OBD: this is an interface, that specifies the physical and electrical parameters required to connect a diagnostic computer and the car's electronics in a standard way. This is the bit that is mandatory by legal requirement, so that a car manufacturer cannot "lock in" its vehicles by requiring service to ...


6

Dodge installed VNT Turbochargers on cars in 89 and 90. The most well known of which is the 1989 Shelby CSX-VNT. The vanes were controlled by a dual port vacuum actuator. There was nothing electronic on the turbo itself, but there were vacuum solenoids (for boost control) on the lines going to the actuator. The VNT Turbo has movable vanes on the exhaust ...


6

The basic answer to your question is: Yes To be more specific, I cannot tell you if it will work or not. It appears you already have the specific dash version you want. What you can do is install it and see if it will work. What is the worst which can happen? If you are not modifying anything to fit the different gauge cluster, all you have to do is ...


5

As Brian alluded to in his comment, in most cases it will not work. You have to have a reader which will read OBD-I. Some readers, like the Innova 3140 will read both, and comes with all of the adapters to attach to the "older" vehicles. Brian also stated about the change to OBD-II. In the US it was mandated to change over in '96. Some manufactures changed ...


5

Sounds like the temperature sensor is broken. A new one is $40-$55, and it's a 30 minute job to replace if you've never done it before (it lives behind the grill in front of the radiator). Not uncommon for these to fail on Subarus and give weird readings. Following Paulster2's comment, here's an image of what the sensor looks like; In this image (of a 2007 ...


5

Here's how to decipher INPA lambdaintegrator Short-term fuel trim. Both banks have a short-term correction of 28%. This should settle down to 0% fairly quickly, so the fact that it stays red indicates that it is attempting to apply the maximum possible correction for a lean condition (and failing to bring it within spec). adaption value additiv This is an ...


5

There are 3 basic aspects; cost, weather and redundancy. Sensors like LIDAR are great at mapping the surrounding world and creating a point cloud. The problem is that high quality LIDARs are very expensive and the processing power to analyze that point cloud in real time is also very expansive. Another aspect is that LIDAR is not forgiving of weather like ...


4

I would think you should be able to if there is a terminal for the wire to attach to. If the terminal has broke off at the base of the sensor, then it probably won't work. I would use a soldering iron, versus open flame type of iron to ensure the heat is more localized. If you are worried about the sensor not working due to the heat, I don't think I would ...


4

Yes, you can put them in the front bumper. You'll need to drill them in - just like the back bumper. I would recommend having a cut off switch for the front sensors somewhere in the cabin, otherwise the beeping would be very annoying. Rear sensors are (usually) powered by the reversing lamp's wiring, so in the front you won't have this... so a cut off ...


4

The thermostat would have been my first guess too. It doesn't need a sealing ring, the housing will slightly clamp it when you put it back together. It is entirely possible that the temperature sensor has 'drifted' and is reading lower than the genuine temperature. I have experienced this more than once in my own cars. It's worth as try as they're usually ...


4

Good question. My answer is, probably not. With a caveat; it depends on the speed of the failure. Sometimes bearings will become excessively noisy before they fail. In this scenario the vehicle owner would notice the impending failure and hopefully do something about it. Chances are that either a torque sensor or a knock sensor on the waterpump could ...


4

As well as being a parking brake warning light, that is also a service brake warning light - i.e. it warns you of problems with the main footbrake. Given what you have described, my first thought would be to check the brake fluid level - if it is near the 'min' mark, you will need to top it up from a fresh, unopened container. If it is empty, or below the '...


4

Sounds high for a car with a 2.0 liter engine. I used to have 1989 Opel Vectra with 2.0 8V SOHC engine, and the consumption was around 8-9L/100km. But then again, if you drive mainly short trips in stop and go city traffic, the consumption can actually be fine. If it's really consuming too much fuel, you should consider where the fuel goes. It can go to a ...


4

There are a few causes of overheating that wouldn't be fixed by your previous repairs. System not pressurising: The radiator cap needs to seal pressure in. If it doesn't, your coolant will boil at a lower temperature than intended, preventing it from flowing through the system properly. Check your rad cap. Coolant temperature sensor: sometimes, they get ...


4

For your 626, I'm seeing two different temp sensors listed. I'm seeing this single bladed one: Which shows to be associated with the gauge. I also see this two bladed one: Which I assume is for the ECU. I'm going to give an educated guess and state your Mazda is setup with the separate sensors which works out well in this case. As for other cars, this is ...


3

OK, so it seems like the IAT on this model is integrated with the MAF:


3

If your engine is the ABA engine, it's located in the distributor. You have to disassemble the distributor in order to get it out. For the money, they suggest it's a good time to replace the entire distributor. (NOTE: I'm not promoting that site ... please do your research and get what is right for you. Please notice what is said on the line for the sensor, ...


3

I'm a little concerned by the proposed fixes. While I don't know the specifics of your Merc, I find it odd that the timing chain would be responsible for fuel trim codes. The ECU swap seems to be a concerted attempt at what I like to call 'parts roulette': possible, but not probable. If you have codes for fuel trims and misfires, the principal components ...


3

Most of the time, intake air temperature is not the same as ambient air temperature. This is because the air absorbs heat from the hot engine bay area before the intake air temperature sensor (IATS) measures its temperature.The heat-soak effect typically worsens on hot days and when the engine is under high loads. Another factor to consider is that the ...


3

The two requirements are separate. OBDII is required in all vehicles since 1996. This is primarily an emissions related regulation to formalize how vehicles would relay emissions failures to the user and to mechanics. The standard has many parts, but it primarily designated a connector, its pinout, and allowed one of five different electrical signalling ...


3

Disclaimer: I've never done this practically. This answer is based on my somewhat limited exposure to turbomachinery theory in automotive applications. It's all about the flow Unlike fixed-geometry turbos, in which the vanes provide optimal efficiency for a single flow, vane angles are adjusted in variable-geometry turbos to enhance efficiency across a ...


3

The fault code is related to your TPS Your TPS is a throttle position sensor. The fault code is not necessarily indicative of a broken wire although it could be. It sounds as though you have validated some of the wiring to your ECU but there are some additional checks you can perform to ensure that the issue is indeed your TPS. Check your wiring FROM ...


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