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44

That sounds very risky to me. The portions of the plugs that reside in the combustion chamber are designed to tolerate the heat and pressure there. I don't think they will melt. So what will happen is that those parts are likely to remain in the cylinder and may get caught between the top of the piston and the head and/or valves. That is likely to do more ...


32

Copper conducts better and is generally used in higher-performance/modified engines. In dedicated race cars resistor-less copper plugs are used. Iridium and platinum plugs are chosen for their longevity only. You shouldn't gap iridiums because of potential damage to the tips. For that reason and their inferior conductivity, they aren't used in modified ...


32

Do NOT drive a car with a piece of sparkplug inside the engine. It can (and likely will) lead to serious damage (up to a catastrophic engine failure). Get your car towed to a service and have the pieces of the broken plug removed. Additionally, get the oil changed (probably with a flush too, to remove all the debris). You will have to spend some money on ...


24

That's a nice car - don't be a consumer and break it because you're too lazy to fix it properly. Sadly the "proper" fix is to tow it to your mechanic, who will take the head off and fish out the broken pieces. He'll also check the head and valves for damage while its off, and make a recommendation. An old engine idling at low speed might happily burp out ...


24

Why is this a thing? For bulbs it is - spark plugs don't care. The problem with getting fingerprints on bulbs (specifically halogen-type bulbs) is actually the grease that gets left behind - the bulb will get quite hot when lit and grease on a portion of the bulb will cause differences in the rate of heating on the bulb surface and thanks to the way ...


20

In a word: NO! Please do not use an impact wrench on these. You run the distinct chance of stripping out all of the threads in the head, which will cause a huge nightmare for you having to have threads replaced (Heli-coil or the like). Just use a socket/ratchet and you'll be fine.


18

If this happened during a plug change If you have roadside assistance/towing, I would highly recommend getting it towed home, then purchase a cheap USB inspection camera or a inspection unit like this one from Harbor Freight and look inside the spark plug hole to see if there is any remnants of the plug and any trauma to the exhaust value. If it happened ...


12

The main difference is the material that the 'tip' of the spark plug is made of - normal ones are usually copper, whereas the other two have tips made out of platinum or iridium. Platinum and iridium tips tend to last longer - copper tends to erode over time so the spark plugs wear out - plus they're slightly better conductors and can produce a spark under ...


12

From a device called a coil. The coil is basically a transformer which takes in the 12vdc voltage from the battery and upconverts it to around 40k vdc (depending on the ignition system). Here is a breakdown of what a basic coil looks like from the inside: The battery input feeds the primary coil. This is a thicker wire with a number of windings. The ...


11

Sounds to me like the plug is still in the head as normal, just with the porcelain and electrode snapped on the top end (where the ignition line attaches). If that's the case, it should be really easy to handle, you just need the exact right tool. You may need to take the manifold off to open up your workspace, but you should be able to access it with a ...


11

I have a telescopic magnet which is invaluable for this very scenario. It even has a light built into the end of the magnet. I bought it because I saw it in the tool shop and it's gotten me out of a mess so many times that I can't even think how I coped without it.


10

Yes. Very gently tapping to decrease gap is fine. Most spark plug gap measuring tools also work to gently pry the electrode back. The key is to be careful. It does not take much force to make the adjustment and the insulation around the electrode can be damaged if handled improperly.


10

First, think of the possible failure modes: Spark plug is clogged with carbon or has an isolation error - it conducts current, but doesn't generate sparks, because the current flows through the carbon from electrode to electrode. Break inside the plug, e.g. broken / worn electrodes - plug doesn't conduct (and of course doesn't generate sparks) Cable has a ...


10

I think your problem is your plug wires. I think they are leaking along the boot and down to ground (earth). With this loss of energy, you'll also see the large carbon buildup on the business end, due to unburnt fuel deposits. Since you are saying you are seeing the carbon tracking on the number one plug again, this is my reasoning for telling you the plug ...


9

They really are that simple - as long as you torque them correctly, there isn't a lot that can go wrong. They are designed to be as straightforward as possible - they don't require calibration, measurement etc. Make sure the connector is securely on the top of the spark plug, and make sure you don't get oil or grease on the contacts. And do them one at a ...


9

My best bet is that the spark plug is too long in the first place. I don't know what the stock spark plug should be for your bike, but the NGK you are showing may/may not be completely within spec and therefor is extending down into the cylinder longer than the spark plug should. If the bottom end was worn out enough to allow the piston to travel that far up ...


9

The spark plug heat range refers to how well the center electrode conducts heat to the head. A hot plug can't conduct the heat very well that is what makes them hot, they can't cool themselves. A cold plug conducts heat well, by moving heat away quickly the spark plug stays cool. The need to control the temperature of the center electrode comes from the ...


9

What you see could very well be burned coolant as well as oil. As the glycerin burns in the combustion process it can take on corrosive properties that degrade the electrodes. Typically with oil in the combustion chamber you don't see as sever of a an electrode degradation as illustrated in your photos. I think your head gasket change is looming and ...


9

No question - running the engine will break it. If you're "unlucky", there's enough clearance between the piston and the valves to fit the spark plug. In that case you'll have the spark plug rattling around inside the cylinder. In approximate order, this will first destroy the valves which will not seal properly when their edges and seat faces get damaged,...


8

Mostly replacement is preventative maintenance. Eventually they'll get cracks that moisture can get into, etc. If they test good, they're probably fine for the moment, however, at their age they could develop problems any time. On my '91 Toyota, I've been through several sets now, and have to say that in my case, OEM is the best. I've tried other brands (...


8

Really what you need to do is learn how to "read" a spark plug. We can tell you what spark plug to use for a stock engine, but once you start modifying the engine, all bets are off. I will explain what reading is and how you, too, can do this at home. As for the spark plug itself, the base spark plug which Denso says is model W14EX-U11. We can from there ...


8

If you are suggesting there was oil inside the head where the valves/cam(s) are located, this would be perfectly normal. If you are saying the oil puddles are outside of the valve/cam area, this isn't normal, but should be taken care of by you putting a new valve cover gasket on the engine. I would say, clean up the entire work area, complete the replacement ...


8

The generalized statements about the gaps being too small causing insufficient burn and too wide having a weak spark are spot on. As you widen the gap, you need to increase voltage to cover the gap. Also, as you increase pressure at the top of the compression cycle, you'll need to either increase the voltage output to the spark plug and/or reduce the gap of ...


8

You would follow these simple steps. Remove plug from engine Place plug into coil wire Make sure threads of the sparkplug are grounded to a metal surface. Validate metal surface goes to ground by using a multimeter Here is some multimeter basics for you. Multimeter - Basic Functionality and Howto Once the sparkplug is grounded to the chassis of the car ...


7

Note that while it's common to re-gap copper plugs, the platinum (and other more exotic) plugs that I've seen usually say that they're not to be re-gapped. If you choose to re-gap them, the risk is possible breakage (potentially during operation) as some of those other metals are more brittle than copper and don't appreciate being re-gapped.


7

It can be, depending on what you get in there. If it is a metal shaving or something hard enough to survive the temperature you could damage a seal, or cause valve damage, but if it is just a piece of lint or dust I wouldn't worry.


7

You can find the spark plug gap specifications on a sticker that will be either on the radiator support or on the underside of the hood (there are other locations such as the strut towers, etc). This is the gap that should be used when using the OEM spark plugs and even when using an off-branded plug that is a valid replacement for the OEM brand. Here are a ...


7

The oil pan never gets hot enough in normal operation to soften the metal of the oil pan or the drain plug, and any thermal expansion at that temperature also shouldn't be much of a concern. For me the ideal temperature is maybe about 20-30 minutes after a drive, or when I can safely put my hand on the drain plug for a few seconds. The oil is still warm ...


7

You mention two issues: fast idle hard brakes Both of these point to a vacuum leak. Inspect the brake booster vacuum line; it might have been compromised during the spark plug swap.


7

Yes you should ground the spark plug. In your case the spark plug was close enough to the block to still jump the gap. If the plug was far enough away from metal nothing would have happened. On a separate note. When testing for spark it is recommended to use a spark tester. Using a spark plug is a poor test of the ignition system. In free air the spark ...


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