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1

I have not hear about using salt water to cool combustion engines. But salt water IS used as coolant in commercial cooling equipment. You could find it in large supermarkets, or in office centers, as it is very convenient, that all equipment in supermarket connected to shared cooling network. For example, they use large industrial chillers mounted on some ...


0

The main thing that came to mind is rust. Salt water will cause this in many metals. So you would need to look into the material. Remember you usually need iron present (for most commonly used alloys) for rust (but not oxidisation, which is a different ball game. So any form of steel or iron and I wouldn't put salt anywhere near it. Probably safer with ...


2

Most modern engines have aluminium heads (or other components) for reduced weight, and absolutely require antifreeze in the coolant for it's anti-corrosion properties. Aluminium heads at temperature are prone to corrosion and using tapwater, other than quite temporarily, will allow corrosion to start. Use antifreeze if you don't want to pay for a new engine (...


1

Some marine engines are cooled directly by the overboard water and some of them tolerate salt water as well. Other than that, @Harper answer sums it best. Edit: If I was in a dire need to travel in a sub-freezing conditions (or any other conditions where only e.g. sea water is available, I would pretty much try. Few hours of salty water can't be as bad as 10 ...


1

In addition to the corrosive nature of salt water antifreeze does another duty--it has a higher boiling point than water.


4

Salt-water (sodium chloride) solution was, and often still is, used for weight/ballast inside tractor and equipment tires, as that cheap alternative to antifreeze in winter. Very nasty stuff and highly corrosive to metals not prepared for it. No way would I want that inside an engine block! Interestingly current trends are towards using antifreeze and other ...


0

I believe the antifreeze also acts as a lubricant to moving parts if I'm thinking right. Water not a lubricant plus adding salt might be bad for that part.


29

Terrible idea. The salt will precipitate and block the radiator fins Of course you know you can dissolve things like salt into water. You probably also know there's a limit to how much it can hold - called saturation. Saturation is dependent on temperature. If you saturate warm water and then let it get cold, the material will precipitate - in salt's case, ...


87

Uh ... absolutely not. Salt water will cause corrosion with in the engine block. Salt water is an electrolyte, so will pass electricity which will cause electrolysis. Also, it might be able to handle a bit lower/higher temps than straight water, it doesn't work as well as antifreeze. Antifreeze is usually good to -40°F/-40°C, plus it protects your engine ...


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