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1

Here's the thing with the sniffer test, if not done right, you'll easily get a false positive, meaning the liquid will turn yellow or yellowish even though there's no hydrocarbons (my understanding is, the fluid is actually detecting hydrocarbons, but I could be wrong ... there should absolutely be no hydrocarbons in your coolant, but could be in your ...


0

The Honda Type 2 Coolant contains "NO Silicate and borates," and that is the key. What they probably used was the cheap Prestone from Walmart. Now, that's a pretty good coolant nowadays, but the chemical composition is slightly different. Will it have an impact? Hard to say, probably minimal. Your biggest risk is warranty compliance, but seeing as how you're ...


1

It very well could have had an air pocket which finally worked its way out. That would drop the coolant level a little. I'd see nothing wrong with adding a bit of 50/50 mix to top it off ... just pay attention to your owners manual as to what type of coolant you should be using. If you need to, call the dealership maintenance department. They can tell you ...


1

Had the same problem, Coolant going everywhere. changed the plastic thermostat neck, changed the water pump. Still coolant going everywhere. Took the timing chain cover off to reseal and discovered that the chamber inside the motor mount that is bolted thru the timing chain cover has a hole in the top for ventilation I guess. Well over the years it sealed ...


23

There's a very straightforward answer to this question: Water has a much, much higher capability to transfer heat than oil. Even if you were able to overcome the safety and design issues brought up in other answers, you'd still have to overcome the fact that water has a huge performance advantage at transferring heat compared to other common fluids (...


5

Water has the nice property that it boils at a fairly low temperature, so the vapour pressure rises quickly with temperature and it is easy to design fail-safe over-pressure protection (a simple spring-loaded filling cap). Also, water is not flammable. Oil does not have those nice properties, and a cooling system failure which released high pressure, high ...


3

Oil has been used as a heat transfer fluid in many applications (especially high temperature ones) but in engines the higher viscosity will require more pumping power, which means more driving power from the belt and so more power from the engine. Then there are the issues of cost... and, of course, issues with replacing fluid if you are far from an auto ...


0

I had the same problem on my old e39 3.0d with the webasto auxiliary heater failed, those things cost a fortune to repair and they will break again due to age and placement on the car. I was planning (sold the car before I did) to buy a chinese parking heater (you can get one for as low as 150$ now) and install it to heat the cabin and maybe blow a fraction ...


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