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7

If the motor oil has a distinct smell of exhaust fumes, it might also mean that the cylinder head gasket has become leaky. Transmission fluid should never smell of exhaust gases, but can get a certain burnt smell from the clutch pads.


8

Smelling AT fluid is (or did ) give a good hint of the transmission general condition , but it requires experience. The clutches and bands have material like brake pads and if they slip, they heat very quickly although running in oil , and have a "burned" smell.


18

First of all you're not smelling CO (carbon monoxide) as that is an odorless and colorless gas. What you are likely smelling are combustion byproducts and that is not at all uncommon in the engine oil. The transmission oil is another story and I suspect you are just smelling the oil itself. The thing I'd be concerned about is a sharp "burnt" smell that ...


0

There are a number of places oil can leak. Losing that much oil sounds like like it is certainly an oil leak and unlikely due to blow-by. If you are not confident in diagnosing and replacing seals yourself you will need a mechanic to do this. Look under and around the engine for places that look gunked up/really dirty, this will be the area the oil is ...


1

No, I do not believe that your engine as designed would possibly operate for very long without coolant in the water jackets. Even if ordinary engine oil was poured in there in place of the water, it would not work very well as others have explained. I don't disagree with any of the answers listed to this point. However, I would say that once one begins to ...


0

I had the thermostat gasket replaced along with my coolant being flushed out and it seems to have solved the issue, I’ve had water added to my system rather than coolant to see how it goes.. Been running for a week from today with no issues


2

$5-10 extra for a premium tankful makes this a rather expensive way to dispose of old oil. To say nothing of engine parts such as the cat and O2 sensors. And fuel filters, cringe. If this was literally my only way to do that, I would a) let it sit for a month to settle out metallics and soot, and b) filter it to 5 microns. Then add it at less than a ...


-1

I rebuilt a cars suspension two years ago and to avoid using grease (which I knew to be bad to rubber bushes) I used vaseline. One year on and the car has hardly done 1000 miles, the bushes have started to break up.. They are either poor quality bushes or the vaseline has degraded the rubber very fast.. Bad news as I now have to do the whole job again 😣


0

Hope this is a joke! Since you happen to live in an area where a heavy smoking car and/or non-operational catalytic converter does not attract the due regulatory attention, you can as well continue to do so. You will actually save if you don't use premium gas in the mixture. Resisting to throw the oil in the river is good, but throwing it in the atmosphere ...


1

To my knowledge, the thermostat not only has nothing to do with the oil, oil isn't and shouldn't be anywhere near it (as far as the engine is concerned). The coolant and oil should be two separate systems ... narry the two shall meet. If they do, then there's something wrong. Just because it isn't overheating doesn't mean there isn't a problem with the head ...


0

Any 'quick lube' joint or auto parts store can accept used oil. No need to 'go all the way back', whatever that means.


1

It should be noted (since nobody else did) that your car isn't designed to burn an oil-mix and that cloud of smoke behind your car is polluting the neighborhood. I am surprised you haven't managed to foul your plugs doing this.


1

Interesting approach. Caterpillar issued a TSB probably 10 years ago, which prescribed dilution rates of crankcase oil to fuel for their off road equipment like bulldozers. Of course those are diesel, and they may not have a catalytic converter to deal with. In a gas car, I would likely avoid the issue. However, I will add that a tribologist friend ...


12

Aside from the numerous reasons not to do this to your car I would like to offer you a solution to your perceived problem. Don't take the old oil back to the store. At least not right away... Your new oil was purchased in single quarts or a 5-quart jug, right? Put your old oil in the empty containers and recycle it at your convenience. This could be the ...


3

It really does hurt your car. Just think about it, your car isn't made to process this type of liquid, so why would you just dup it in? Its basically like dumping tar in your tank and expecting it to run. Yeah, not exactly good for any of your car parts. Your friend is definitely right that you are lucky you haven't had any real problems! You mentioned that ...


12

All modern cars scavenge blow-by including oil vapour and a mist of droplets. This is good for upper cylinder lubrication and does extend ring and bore life. If you have to, you can install a catch can to condense steam and larger sludgy solids. Older cars just vented through a wire wool cap on a rocker cover. Used oil is another matter. There is going ...


81

It's a BAD idea! The oil is contaminated with impurities that will not do the fueling system on your car any favors. Further, it's bad for the environment because your car is NOT designed to burn oil even if it's mixed with gasoline. The best thing to do is to take the used oil to a place where it can be recycled into new oil and used again. Most oil ...


0

Remove the oil from where? If the dipstick tells you there's still too much oil in the engine: a) drain all the oil now in the engine. b) making sure the drain plug has been reinstalled, fill the engine with whatever amount of oil it's supposed to have. The owners manual or a shop manual (or probably even the internet) will know how much that is.


0

Yes, overfilling can easily cause severe damage. Two liters of overfill is quite a bit. The most concerning issue is if the oil is high enough so that the crankshaft hits the top of the oil and foams it up. Now you have an oil-air mixture that is being sorta pumped through your engine instead of the pure oil it's designed for. Severe damage to all ...


0

I have had one in my Toyota Camry wagon for 25 years. No problems. Very convenient. My was made by Frahm, or at least had their name on it. Not an off road vehicle obviously, but I do drive it on some rough or unmaintained roads.


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