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Thanks to everyone for their knowledge regarding why the exhaust would vibrate when the AC was on. To paraphrase when the AC was on the engine was under a slight load, lowering the RPM and causing the vibration. As to the source of the rattling, I was able to investigate this weekend and it turns out my car has a tip on the tail pipe. The tip itself was ...


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Suggesting an answer as I don't have enough rep to comment. In the same vein as Jimmio's answer, when the AC is on it's probably creating resonance along the exhaust due to RPM shifts. I actually had a very similar issue, I'd get a rattle at very specific RPM ranges from the back of the exhaust. My issue turned out to be several slightly separated exhaust ...


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The refrigerant compressor attached to your motor via rubber belt adds load to the engine. This in turn can lower your engine RPM, causing an object to reverberate as the frequency matches it's length or is otherwise able to excite the material, similar to a guitar's string. That's the rattle. It could be any part, any piece, and anywhere on the car, as ...


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Most refrigerants, especially (chloro)fluorocarbons, are not toxic per se. @Moab: R-134a also is not toxic, but it is banned since it's a strong greenhouse gas. Propane makes a not so bad refrigerant and is not toxic. But it burns good. CO2 is not a good refrigerant, but it does not burn and is not such a strong greenhouse gas. Since car ACs always leak a ...


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Check the can of air you have. If it's a resealable can, you will need a self-sealing tap. If it's a puncture-type can, you need a puncture tap. If you have a resealable can, puncture taps will not work; they'll pierce the membrane, and when withdrawn, the membrane will reseal itself. So no 134A will be transferred to the Yellow hose. Look at your can tap. ...


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