6

What is a CV Axle? CV stands for Constant Velocity. It's a type of axle which is used on front wheeled drive vehicles which allows power to still be transmitted to the front tires even while wheel is turned. It is called "constant velocity" due to the way it's designed. No matter which way the outer section is turned, it will remain at the same speed as the ...


6

While the other answer is basically correct, it really doesn't tell you why it does this. These two things are related because of the differential. The differential is made to allow either side to spin at different rates. There are three connections to the differential in a rear wheel drive vehicle: drive shaft (from transmission); left axle shaft; right ...


4

What I'm going to say applies to both drive shafts on an independent rear suspension (IRS) or with a drive shaft going from the transmission to the differential. There are several different things you need to consider when dealing with a pair of u-joints, all of them having to do with their relationship to each other. The drive shafts should be clocked the ...


4

Absolutely. Remember what I wrote about stress risers. It doesn't matter if it's metal or rubber, the stress riser will behave the same. This is the beginning stages of wearing out. It won't be long, especially after the vehicle is running again, for it to be completely toast. On a separate note, since I have foreknowledge of what you are doing with the ...


3

Yes it is related, both drive shafts (cv shafts) must be connected and in working order for park to work, use the e brake like you have been. Replace the cv shaft and all will be working again.


3

Something loose in gearbox that has allowed two pairs of gears to engage at the same time locking the box. Or something jamming the output shaft. Separate the output shaft from the gearbox and see if the rear wheel rotates, if still not, then it is something shaft or wheel related. Trailer it home or to a garage and inspect it properly.


2

All we can do it guess. IMO, though not easy to see, it appears the slip joint is corroded. If the joint is not able to slide in and out as the suspension travels up and down, then it will put undue tensile stress on the joint. Once a crack forms, it is only a matter of time before it twists off.


2

If you have enough clearance to fit under the Wrangler, there's no mechanical reason you cannot do this while the vehicle is on the ground. Torquing the pinion nut with it on the ground will not cause any issue to the differential.


2

The purpose of a drive shaft is to transmit power from the transmission (or transfer case) to the differential. This is their main and only purpose. A drive shaft can be made from any material which can withstand the twisting force. The three most used materials are steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber. Carbon fiber is a more recent addition to the family and ...


2

When a rear wheel drive car makes 1 tire revolution while driving how many revolutions does your drive shaft make? It depends on the gearing in the differential. If the gear ratio is 3.42:1, the driveshaft will make 3.42 turns for every 1 turn of the wheel. Are driveshafts mistaken as an off balanced tire if they are near the same ratio? It could be, ...


2

Welcome to the site. If your prop shaft needs balancing, have this done before driving the car any distance. The vibration you are feeling will be coming from either the differential or the gearbox, the reason it doesn't happen straight away is that the oil in both of these parts is cold to start with and is thicker when cold. If left unchecked, you stand ...


2

Great answers from Paulster. I would add: Prop shaft: probably short for propeller shaft (which is the drive shaft that runs the drive or torque all the way from the transmission to the rear axle assembly in rear-wheel-drives). Drive shaft is the proper name for a shaft that runs from a final drive to a driving wheel, or a shaft between the transmission and ...


1

As discussed in the comments, this is the inner CV joint. Make sure you get a rubber gaiter and grease with the new one. You will likely need to re-use the bolts.


1

My suggestion is to take a Dremel tool or a angle grinder and clean out the weld, then you'll be able to back the nut off. The threads are already buggered from the welding which they were accosted with. Clean up the weld the best you can off of the shaft (and I mean really clean them up), then back the nut off, which should pull whatever debris off of them ...


1

Your issue is probably connected with driveline. I will assume that it is rwd/4wd car as you are suspecting driveshaft problems. To diagnose whether it is driveshaft related problem, drive slowly next to a wall (road separators are good) in neutral and "measure" the frequency of the knocks by hearing. Differentials usually have a ratio from 1:2 to 1:4 so ...


1

I'm not sure what manufacturers use for their mass produced aluminum drivelines (though they may use it), but aftermarket driveline manufacturers such as Denny's use 6061-T6 tubing to create their drivelines. Even their yokes are made from forged 6061-T6. So, to answer your question: yes, it is a good choice when building drivelines.


1

If this sound is a heavier and regular knocking type sound as you're moving forwards or backwards whilst applying a little throttle on full steering lock, it indicates a failing CV joint.


1

If you safely "lock" the broken driveshaft, then the other front wheel will rotate if you put it in gear, note this will be at 2 times the speed... I did this to drive a saw bench from a rear axle vehicle...


1

Usually drive shaft issues can be attributed to aftermarket engine modifications (more torque) or tires (more traction, and thus a higher peak torque through the shaft). In both those cases slight twisting of the shaft near the failure point will be visible. It's hard to diagnose from the photo, but I don't think that I see that tell-tale twisting other ...


1

I have only once seen a drive shaft snap. The cause was traced to a faulty batch of steel. The shaft had inclusions within the steel which reduced its strength. Once found, the company issued a recall on the vehicle model. This was back in the 1970s so I would hope modern quality control is a little better. But it may be something for you to look for.


1

Sounds like a driveshaft joint or support bearing. If it failed completely and hit other things as you moved it then you will need to check brake lines, suspension components and any abs / brake wear warning wires - anything in the area of the broken part...


1

It is a bit odd based on the mileage (in my experience they typically last 100k miles at minimum) but it's certainly possible that it was damaged instead of going bad. The boot could have been torn by something on the road and no one noticed until it was clicking at which point the usual remedy is to replace it. I wouldn't rule it out simply because of this....


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