19

What is a Differential ? A differential’s job is to compensate for differences. Specifically the differences in wheel speed when turning. For instance, imagine taking a corner. Your inside wheel has a shorter distance to travel than the outside wheel as you go around the corner. That means that your outside wheel has to turn faster to keep pace with the ...


19

FWD cars dont have a rear axle, the wheels are mounted independently, there may be some situations where there is a tube there, but it will not have an axle shaft.


9

I can think of several advantages of having two independent motors, one for each wheel: no need for a diff/gearbox Today's technology allows electric motors to be attached directly to the wheel, so a two-motor configuration would do away with the need for a mechanical differential or gearbox. Less components = less manufacturing cost, so it is a ...


8

My suggestion would be to buy a differential bearing and seal kit for the rear end yourself and have a knowledgeable mechanic install it for you. This, as the name implies, consists of bearings and seals. A master kit will have the shims in it as well, but when you are just doing bearings in the diff, you can usually put the old shims back in to get ...


8

Yes, gear ratios are the second largest influence on your fuel consumption. Number one being maladjusted timing. I always relay the story of my and my wife's cars: she has a 1.4 Opel Corsa and I have a 2.0 Turbo Coupe. While my car has more than twice the power of hers and weighs 350kg more, we get about the same consumption figures (she gets 12.5km/l and I ...


7

The wheels just ride independently on bearings, they aren't connected by an axle like in a RWD vehicle. I think you misunderstand the true purpose of a differential. A ring and pinion is necessary to take the rotation of the driveshaft and change it's rotational axis. That is, the driveshaft is spinning about an axis from front to back of the vehicle and ...


6

See Is it OK to replace only 2 tires on an AWD car?. If you call different Audi dealers you're likely to get differing answers regarding how much tread depth difference is OK for the all-wheel-drive system. Nonetheless, I would advocate calling to get specific recommendations for your vehicle, as some all-wheel drive systems are more sensitive to ...


5

What you are describing is a normal condition. The drive axle is connected to the Drive Pinion Gear which is meshed with both Differential pinion gears. As you turn the wheel both of the differential pinion gears rotate around the other drive pinion gear since it's being held by the other wheel on the ground. This turns the Carrier which is attached to the ...


5

Your truck is most likely equipped with an open differential. This is a normal condition. A few vehicles are equipped with what is called Posi-Traction, Sure-grip or locking differential. These differentials are equipped with internal clutches that spin both rear tires when moving in a straight line. When going around a turn the clutches release allowing the ...


5

It may not be apparent right away but may cause issues later on. The Limited Slip Differential contains clutches. They require oil with an additive that allows the clutches to operate correctly. Check the container that the oil came in, it should say Limited Slip/ Posi-trac compatible. It may be in small print on the back of the bottle. If it doesn't, you ...


5

My WRX is a somewhat different setup but, Subaru being what they are, most of the equipment is very similar. But yesterday, it started making really awful clunking and grinding noises whenever I'm in gear, especially while accelerating. I suspect that this is where your "glitter" is coming from. I do hear clunking and squeaking while turning tight ...


4

From page 200 for the 'Rear Differential Lock' diagram... The 'RR Diff Lock' switch simply passes ignition voltage (+12) to an input on the ECU (R) pin. When the ECU sees this signal it controls an electric motor to lock the differental via the (M1) (M2) pins. This happens via an h-bridge (inside the ecu), which is capable of reversing the current through ...


4

https://mechanics.stackexchange.com/a/25370/12697 Covers the physical arrangment of gears in a basic differential. The key to understanding a differential is to understand how these gears behave under different scenarios. The gearing arrangement means that relative to the crown wheel the two half shafts are constrained to turn by equal and opposite ammounts....


4

This system is called the drive train: The shaft I was talking about was the prop-shaft. How I forgot that I don't know. If your car is allwheel drive or can be it'll have something called (unimaginatively and again, I don't know how I forgot this) a 'transfer box'


4

I'm taking my information from two sources, this Digital Trends article and the good old Engineering Explained video. Digital Trends explains it as: How this differs from a standard differential is that, where as a basic mechanical diff spins the outer wheel faster than the inner wheel (it has longer to travel), the TVD in the RC F employs electronic motors ...


3

In a situation like this, my Landrover Discovery 2 uses the traction control system to pulse the brakes on the wheels that are spinning faster than the others (described simply). In so doing, it transfers torque to the other wheels which should then cause all 4 wheels to turn. I would presume that your vehicle should be doing a similar thing, especially ...


3

Think worn-out rubber. Sway bar end bushings, sway bar (middle) bushings, shock absorber bushings. A worn out U-Joint or CV joint can also cause tick and thump noises.


3

This could work in a car with an open differential and an active traction control system. When the system detects a wheel spin, it actively brakes (and locks out) the particular wheel, as a consequence the torque is directed by the differential to the wheel with traction (least resistance, as you noted). I do not know the details of the implementation in ...


3

that is a magnetically controlled clutch pack. It is similar to a limited slip differential. It is used in kia's AWD vehicles. It looks like a Jtekt ITCC active AWD unit. here is their brochure and you can see a cutaway of it half way down with the clutch pack. yours has a different casing but should be very similar. and the soreno uses them so it's a ...


3

I don't think it's the differential, I believe it would affect both front wheels. A failed hub is where my money is, although it could still be something related to the brakes. I don't think a seized caliper would give you 1 free rotation and then lock again, unless your rotor is terribly uneven. Take the wheel off and start with a visual inspection. See ...


3

All three - front, back and transfer box/centre diff. As it's a permanent 4WD system, all three diffs are in constant use, so if you've got no record of them being changed, it's probably worth doing all of them. Saying that, what does the service schedule recommend? I can't remember if the Discovery 3 still has traditional 'swivels' on the front axle, but ...


2

It seems to me there's some confusion about terms here. An axle is just a bit of ironmongery holding the wheels in place. The wheels can rotate independently of the axle: there's a bearing between wheel and axle. Here's a Ford model T front axle: The two wheels are connected, and suspension is provided by leaf springs between the axle and the chassis. ...


2

There are no clear advantages on the production vehicle mentioned. The whole process of producing the vehicle is not taken into account. Imagine having to build a vehicle with the two motors instead of one. You'd have twice the amount of motors (and supporting equipment) to build, service, diagnose, and replace. Then comes the issue of driving dynamics. ...


2

Ultimately, I replaced the half shaft and found out that wasn't it (although, for reference, the half shaft ended up being really easy to change. Was able to do it without even removing the wheel bearing). Even though it seemed full, I just added some differential fluid and the noise seemed to subside. I will be changing the fluid entirely in the future and ...


2

Okay, you've got it a bit backwards; Let me explain. An Open Differential has what is commonly referred to as "spider gears". These in combination with clutch packs allow one wheel to apply more torque or rotate quicker for better traction so your wheels don't bind up during sharp cornering or if you lose a lot of traction to one tire. A Closed ...


2

You need to identify exactly where the sound is coming from. To do this, jack up the front end and put it on jack stands. If it's what I'm thinking it is, you can probably keep the tires straight, then have one person hold one tire while you turn the other. If the noise is coming from the differential, as you are saying, you are probably going to need a ...


2

Most 4x4 vehicles (as opposed to all wheel drive) do not have a differential in the transfer case. The Dodge Durango, has a non-differential transfer case, meaning that the front and rear drive shafts will spin at the same speed all the time in 4 wheel drive. There shouldn't be any problem with removing your front drive shaft and driving your vehicle. As a ...


2

The R53 is a Getrag GS6 and has a 25% locking limited slip. If I'm not mistaken, it is a clutch-type. As far as a lack of information, you'll quickly find that most MINI owners just don't care what's in the car, just how expensive it is. ;)


1

My problem was when i heard clicking noises coming from my diff, it ended up being the pinion gearing. It was a tooth chipped off. So you should check that out when ya get a chance.


1

Detroit lockers aren't the most streetable differentials, but they should be a little easier to deal with than what you're describing. Two things: 1- That's a lot of play in your driveshaft and it sounds like too much to be incorrectly set backlash in the ring and pinion gear. Are your u-joints and carrier bearing (if you have one) ok? While you're checking ...


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