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27

The main reason those would be sticking out of your battery post/terminal is because the terminal clamp has become too stretched. Someone put the copper wire in there to take up the slack of the clamp. Without them you'd lose connection and the battery would not provide the power to get the car started as well as the system having the ability to charge the ...


21

Based on the pictures that you provided, there are three things that are clearly damaged right off the bat. Your lower control arm is broken. This is the mechanism that houses your lower ball joint and provides upright stability to the wheel. With it broken, the wheel "folds" under the car as there is nothing holding the bottom of the wheel in place. ...


20

I agree with @resident_heretic that these are the link arms for your stabilizer bars. The bar acts as a torsion spring that tends to keep the car level during cornering. With the links broken on the passenger side I would expect you to notice a few things: More body roll during cornering, A possible loss of traction on the inside wheel in corners, and ...


18

I would suggest that the original problem was not the use of E10 (the vast majority of all gas sold in the US is E10 fuel due to federal mandate), but rather you received a ration of bad gas which probably had water in it, or was old gas (had been sitting for a while without new gas infused in the mix). I don't think there are any remnants of the bad gas in ...


17

The ECON button is not a placebo, though the wording from that specific web page is a bit vague. The key is that the ECON button and the Eco-Assist system are two separate things. According to Honda, pressing the ECON button configures your car to improve mileage at the cost of performance. Turning it off will improve power and reduce mileage, which you ...


17

I agree with resident_heretic - DO NOT drive the car again until it has been properly repaired. It sounds like you have multiple bent or broken suspension parts, and if the crash was bad enough to have done that much, there is a high chance the frame could be bent too (rendering the car irreparable) - get it properly checked by a competent mechanic to make ...


13

Looks like a stabilizer bar link. They come in pairs one on the left and one on the right side. They attach to the stabilizer bar. Stabilizer bars are part of a car's suspension system. They are sometimes also called anti-sway bars or anti-roll bars. Their purpose in life is to try to keep the car's body from "rolling" in a sharp turn.


12

Based on what I could understand of your description. I am surprised that that the vehicle would move let alone be driveable. Despite what your stepfather said I would strongly advise against driving anywhere until it is fixed. You would putting your life at risk in doing so. Sounds like multiple issues- linkages,tie rods, steering rack and pinon unit, ...


12

Everyone else has said it already, but to reiterate: DO NOT DRIVE THIS CAR ON PUBLIC ROADS! This car is a danger to yourself, and everyone who shares the road with you. Continuing to drive this car is irresponsible, and more than likely illegal depending on your jurisdiction. I imagine the damage is fairly obvious whether stopped or moving, and any ...


11

Your most expensive problem is that a V-tec motor is designed to operate at higher RPM's than your motor can handle. This would mean that you'd have to get stronger pistons and connecting rods (or conrods as they're referred to). You'd also need to upgrade your valve springs to cope with the higher RPM. All in all, you're probably going to be spending about $...


11

Tyres screech when they skid on a dry road surface. Your car will have ABS and probably some stability control too, which stop tyres from skidding by modulating the braking force around the tyres that have the most grip or by reducing the braking force just enough to prevent a skid. Unfortunately it means you don't get the screeching sound of 70's police ...


11

The transmission has a lock up torque converter. The torque converter sits between the engine and transmission. It is kind of like a clutch on a manual transmission car. When the engine is idle, it is barely engaged, so the engine will not stall. It will engage harder and until a certain RPM. Torque converters will always have some slip in them until ...


10

The hump provides longitudinal rigidity in the unibody. The fact that it also provides a place to route the exhaust is a bonus. Notice that modern CAD-designed vehicles have much less of an obvious hump, unless they also have a roofless option (cabriolet, convertible, removable hardtop). On these vehicles the center hump is the main rigid structure in the ...


9

Depends on who you ask. Any tire shop will say yes, it affects handling and braking. And it will. But to what degree? Not much. If the tread life of all the tires are similar, the ratings similar, etc. you can reduce this. Still, the different tread patterns will cause different handling. In the rain perhaps one tire will be less effective than the others ...


9

Although automated manuals are becoming more popular, the 2012 Civic (from my 2 seconds of searching) appears to be a normal automatic. Even still, I'm guessing your vehicle may have the sensors and programming necessary to determine that it's descending an incline and is employing engine braking to help you slow down. What it sounds like it's doing is ...


9

This is unrelated to the use of E10. Almost all, if not all modern vehicles can use E10. Concentrations above 10% Ethanol, E15 for example can cause problems in cars not designed for it. What you are describing is a misfire, and it's likely cause is in the ignition side. Spark plugs, wires, etc. Check for history codes, if your check engine light was ...


8

It was indeed the catalytic converter (the EX does not have a pre-cat). After replacing it, the downstream sensor graph spends most of its time above 0.5 V, as it should if the converter is working. Update: I started getting this error code again, a little over a year after replacing the cat. I also finally found a guide on how to read these graphs, from ...


8

Mostly replacement is preventative maintenance. Eventually they'll get cracks that moisture can get into, etc. If they test good, they're probably fine for the moment, however, at their age they could develop problems any time. On my '91 Toyota, I've been through several sets now, and have to say that in my case, OEM is the best. I've tried other brands (...


8

As discussed in the comments already, the clicking you hear is probably the starter solenoid. You have ruled out a weak battery being the probable cause by attempting to the jump-start the engine. This means either the power cable running directly from the battery to the starter motor is too resistive/poorly connected, or that the starter motor itself is no ...


8

Cabin air filters will usually filter the air on either setting if located on the cabin side of the firewall. But even in recirculation mode, outside air will make its way in. Just be sure to replace it as frequently as your manual suggests. However, filters located under the hood at the air intake will not filter recirculated air. Edit: I decided to ...


8

Anyone can feel free to disagree with me since I'm not 100% on this, but I believe those bumps are placed into the design in order to give the exhaust system a little more breathing room. Note the hump in the actual body of the car above the exhaust here. This is to aid in keeping unwanted heat away from the passenger area of the car while the heat shield ...


8

I don't think the hump is there just for the exhaust, although as was pointed out in the comment it adds ground clearance which is a nice thing. The "transmission hump" (in honor of rear wheel drive cars) also adds structural strength – essentially a beam running down the center of the car. I suspect that if it wasn't needed (or at least very useful) for ...


7

You don't weigh them against each other. Items are generally inspect or replace at x miles or y period of time, whichever comes first. This is what you need to do to keep the car within factory tolerances. Go outside of that range and you become a "test driver", which may not be an issue, but it could be for certain parts...


7

As they are made of rubber, belts begin to perish over time, and this weakens them. The constant flexing as the engine turns accelerates this weakening process. Eventually (if it weren't replaced), the rubber would split and the belt would snap - causing very expensive damage to your engine... It is quite easy to visually observe a belt that definitely ...


7

You have the D16A6 engine. From searching various forums it seems that is an interference design. However, while valve damage is possible (probable?), it may not be certain. There do seem to be reports of timing belt breaks without valve damage. Then again, there are reports of bent valves, too (though that is a later 1.7L version of your engine). A break at ...


7

The front licence plate bracket on a Civic consists of 3 parts. The first is the part your dealing with. Inside the bumper there should be plates with nuts welded to it. Number 4 in the picture, 2 required. The only way to get at it is to remove the bumper fascia (plastic cover). In a civic this is pretty easy. There are only a hand full of bolts and push ...


7

At a guess? From your description I'd bet it has a blown head gasket. The only way to tell if this is so is to do a sniffer test (search for "block tester") at the radiator. There are testers which, when in contact with hydrocarbons, change color from blue to green to yellow. Here is an example: The only way the fluid will change color is in the presence of ...


7

With a flat thin small screwdriver, you should be able to wiggle under it and pry up a little bit, then move to the opposite side of the same fastener and do the same thing. Working back and forth should bring it off of the pin without issue. The fastener thing may end up a little bent, but as long as the pin is okay, I'd suggest you'd be in good shape. This ...


7

From what I remember from my Civic driving days, the radiator in that car only extends half way across the grill of the car, and the other half is blocked off by a plastic cover as you mentioned. You also mentioned that you removed this cover in the summer to increase airflow to the engine. This is actually the opposite of what you should have done, ...


7

Each bulb usually has 2 filaments in it, one for low beam and one for high beam. One possibility is that your driver's side bulb has a broken high beam filament and the passenger side has a broken low beam filament. A search reveals that your headlight bulbs are likely of type H4 and look like the following. They match my description above. This video ...


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