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55

Not at all, in fact there are many occasions when you would want the tires at an angle to the body of the car. Any time you're parked on a hill it is prudent to angle the wheels of the car so that if the parking brake failed to hold the car would run into the curb. If the wheels were aligned with the body when parked on a hill the car would be free to roll ...


26

Perhaps my post is a bit late, but make sure you always face your wheels to an angle if you park your vehicle on a hill. A brake failure can lead into some heavy damage. If you parked your vehicle at an angle, you will get the following: Much better, right? Also, if you drive a car with a clutch, make sure you are in the reverse or the first gear. This ...


19

FWD cars dont have a rear axle, the wheels are mounted independently, there may be some situations where there is a tube there, but it will not have an axle shaft.


18

To answer your question directly, this is a "standard practice" but a VERY poor one. Getting the correct torque is by far more important than getting it done quickly. With the axle nut it is imperative you tighten it to the correct spec. If you tighten it too tight, the wheel bearing will self destruct within a few hundred miles. Using an impact gun can ...


12

Neither. Just get a 1m long bar (by extending a breaker or similar), stick it on the nut so that it is horizontal and simply hang 250N of mass at the end of it: (*) 250N = 56.2 lbs = 25.5 Kg 250N * 1m = 250Nm Rinse and repeat until it hangs and doesn't tighten the nut anymore. The trick is to keep the bar horizontal, you'll likely need a 12-point socket ...


10

True for some axles. Given the different bearing designs between the inner and out CV joint. The CV joints will include the required grease when purchased. The color depends more on the manufacturer than anything. There are aftermarket (read: Valvoline, Castrol, etc) greases that can be used in the inner and outer cv joint.


9

(I would have added this as a comment but I don't have the reputation yet) As dlu pointed out, on steep hills you want to angle your front wheels towards the kerb, but there are also situations where you want to leave the wheels straight - my brother's car was written off when he left it parked on a very narrow street with the wheels at an angle. A van ...


7

The wheels just ride independently on bearings, they aren't connected by an axle like in a RWD vehicle. I think you misunderstand the true purpose of a differential. A ring and pinion is necessary to take the rotation of the driveshaft and change it's rotational axis. That is, the driveshaft is spinning about an axis from front to back of the vehicle and ...


6

The only thing I see of any real concern here would be the left rear toe - it's off enough to possibly cause some tire wear. However, since it can't be adjusted, your best bet is to just rotate the tires regularly (every other oil change is a good rule of thumb) and keep an eye out for wear. You didn't say which Nissan you're driving, but I'm assuming it's ...


6

No, exploding axles are not a normal thing. Return to the shop that replaced them, there should be a warranty on them. Either: the axles were defective the axles weren't installed properly the axles were the incorrect ones for your vehicle


5

I would apply a light coating of white lithium grease. It is thin enough that it it won't be wiped off the shaft sliding through the bearings. It also is resistant to getting washed off by rain or routine washing. The light coating of grease should keep the shaft from seizing in the bearings.


5

First, I have to compliment your stamina. I doubt I'd be able to keep swinging a mallet for two whole weeks. Soak the area in a good penetrating oil. I like Wurth's Rost Off, but there are many choices. Hit it with penetrating oil once or twice a day for a while. Give it a few whacks with a mallet, if it doesn't loosen up, hit it with more penetrating oil, ...


5

The reasons taught by driving instructors to keep wheels angled to the kerb: one so that if the car rolls on a slope the tyres hit the kerb (as above); to avoid the wear and tear of turning the wheels when stopped (a no no); this is where they end up in a parallel park and makes it easy to leave.


5

It looks as though the boot has split and is spewing grease all over the place. If there isn't a lot of dirt let into the boot, you should be able to just replace the boot (yes, this is a chore, but a heck of a lot cheaper than replacing the half-shaft). When you replace the boot, you'll want to put some grease back into it to supplement what was lost. If ...


5

In the States we call this wheel hop. Wheel hop is the rear axle loading and unloading itself in rapid succession. It's caused (as you stated) from either the design of the axle, worn parts, soft parts, hard tire sidewalls, or any combination of these. Wheel hop is very common in vehicles with leaf springs and straight axles. This is because the axles tend ...


4

I'm not convinced it's as simple as that formula. I think you've got three solid bodies involved in the conversation. If it were me, I'd design the system in SolidWorks, then put the pieces together with centerlines and contact surfaces mating. Part of the issue here is ID/OD and axial clearance / slop. Its not much in real life, but enough to be a factor ...


4

It depends on other circumstances. If you are on a slope angled wheels secure your car from rolling down. In the worst case you will damage your tyre agains curbs. In parallel parking, aligning wheels is unnecessary wear of the tyres. But if you are on leveled place with very limitted room aligned wheels allow you to push the car and free some room around ...


4

Axle repair bearings are used when the surface of the axle is chewed up by the old bearing. The repair bearing moves the location of where the bearing rollers ride to a smooth location on the axle. Depending on the vehicle this relocation may not leave enough room for a proper axle seal on the outside of the bearing. In these cases the seal is relocated to ...


4

Axle removed! The idea of banging on the axle bolt is a bad one if the axle is really stuck. Strong taps to dislodge are probably fine but above a certain degree of force, the inner threads on the axle will strip. I resolved this by using a half-inch drive 19mm socket with a short extension. The length and diameter combination allows you to transmit the ...


4

Yes, in almost all cases the replacement CV axle comes as a sealed unit. It is pretty rare to hear of shops replacing individual joints (boots), when it is generally more cost effective to just replace the entire part. Also, torn boots are typically the reason the axle is being replaced, so it wouldn't make sense to "re-use" them from your old axle. Most ...


4

If you look to the very right in this image: You'll see a snap ring. This holds the end of the axle in the transmission. To get it out, you need to wedge something like a long flat tip screwdriver or pry bar in between the transmission case and axle, and pop it free. It will take a little bit of finagling, but it will pop out. Don't pull on the axle shaft ...


3

You would want to use a dial indicator and a pair of vblocks In order to understand the amount of run-out you may have on your axle you will want to be able to measure the amount of run-out and you have on the axle. You could roll it back and forth on a flat surface to get a general idea if the axle is bent but ultimately, to fully understand the issue ...


3

There should be no grease in the boot. The CV joint casing doesn't need packing fully with grease. Pack enough in to cover all the moving parts. If a sachet of grease is included in the kit, then there usually is enough for one joint.


3

Clean off the bulk of the grease with rags, then dump them in a bucket of solvent (gas, kerosene, parts cleaner, mineral spirits). Seafoam or brake cleaner also work, but they're more expensive. Let them sit for a bit, then pull them out, wipe them clean with another rag, re-grease and reassemble.


3

I know exactly the feeling you are having ... been in this situation many times. The thing you need to do is be malevolent on it. You need to grab a pry bar which will give you some leverage. Do not be nice to it. Put the pry bar up between the inner CVJ and the case and really have at it. The axle will pop before you hurt anything (besides yourself). ...


3

It's definitely related to using Fix-A-Flat. The Fix-A-Flat has added enough weight to the inside of the tire to throw off balance. Unfortunately, the fluid it puts inside the tire will likely continue to keep that tire unbalanced, even if it is rebalanced at a shop. They may even find they are unable to balance it because when it's on the machine, since ...


3

There are three things to check. First, check your u-joints to ensure they are in good shape. To do this, chock your tires, put it in neutral, and try to move the drive shaft ends at the yokes. There shouldn't be any play there. Second, you need to check your pinion angle. Basically, if you drew a line directly back from, and in line with the transmission ...


3

I don't believe remanufactured has a legal definition in most states. It is important that you know the company that rebuilds the part. If possible check their web site or literature for specifics. Most of the large reputable rebuilders will state what they replace, what they inspect and what they reuse. You want to understand what they did so you can ...


3

They change the boot and make sure joints are within tolerances and maybe remove some rust and maybe spray or rust treat them. They are not new but recycled and or refurbished to a "new" like state.


3

I can't speak to specifics for your ATV, but the basic process for removing an axle is: Take off the nut holding the axle in the wheel hub. I do this with a large socket wrench/breaker bar. Remove the lower ball joint from the lower control arm (see the bottom middle of your second photo). This can be difficult, and lots of the methods people suggest will ...


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