Hot answers tagged

29

Most of the time you won't need heavy braking in traffic. You can avoid stopping and starting by: Driving more calmly Leaving plenty of distance between you and the vehicle in front (even at low speed) Simply taking your foot of the accelerator early If you let the car slow down, and use the gear until it is no longer appropriate (too slow that the engine ...


15

First, everyone who said that the braking effect comes from the compression stroke is wrong...the air in the cylinder is compressed which takes energy, yet after top dead center acts as a spring and helps force the piston back down, returning the exact same force as was put into it in the first place. Probably more, actually, since the compression heats the ...


10

Your oil pan didn't rust I would just like to point out that your oil pan can't just rust out. It is made of material that doesn't rust. So when you had a hole in your oil pan it more than likely hit a rock or curb or something that penetrated it. Perhaps the other driver of the vehicle. On the other hand, if your oil pan was replaced with something ...


7

New bulbs sometimes don't last long if they have any oil or dirt on them to begin with before you install them. Sometimes you can't even see the dirt or the oil but it's enough to cause the glass to overheat once your headlights warm up. Also, it should go without saying ( and surely you already know this? ) that you can't touch the new bulb with installing ...


6

If the battery is so dead that immediately after stopping it can't start again, then it is not charging. You say that the alternator is fine, but have you checked the charging circuits? Check for a static parasitic draw (see my answer to this question, or various others here on similar subjects). Check the current being produced by the alternator, and the ...


6

I agree with MT_Head's and Donovan's answers, but I'd like to add that the downshift itself can be quite heavy on your synchromeshes if you don't do it right. When you up-shift, the input shaft drops in speed by ordinary friction, and the synchromeshes don't need to work much in order to match it to the speed of the output gear. However, when you down-shift,...


6

I pulled some information from another site (jeepz.com). It looks fairly exhaustive in what should be done to fix the dreaded death wobble. I originally thought the death wobble was only due to a bad wheel bearing, but it appears there is much more to it. I am going to pull what it says on the jeepz.com website. Here is what the site says about what exactly ...


6

CAN-C is the high speed bus that connects the engine, brakes, airbags etc. CAN-IHS is a low speed bus that connects the comfort systems like radio and climate controls.


6

Rear solid axles on trucks especially with leaf springs are not adjustable. To cause enough misalignment for one wheel to rub something must be damaged. I would start by looking at the center bolt of the leaf springs. The bolt ties all the leafs together in the center and is used as an alignment pin with the pad on the rear axle. Everything is held together ...


6

It sounds like a steering angle sensor issue. The ESP/ABS ecu uses the steering angle sensor to determine where you are pointing the steering wheel. It then looks at each wheel speed value, it can determine what direction the vehicle is traveling in by the wheel speeds, if this is different to the steering angle sensor the ESP kicks in. What can happen is ...


5

Just some anecdotal evidence. I downshift at least a few times a day. Only one gear at a time and never send my tach anywhere near the red, BUT I NEVER RIDE THE CLUTCH. Unless it is an emergency I'll downshift and come off the clutch almost as quickly as I do when I upshift, If I'm going to fast for this I don't downshift yet, UNLESS IT'S AN EMERGENCY. ...


5

If you double-clutch the downshifts and ensure that the engine is running at exactly the right speed before you engage the clutch, any additional wear will be insignificant. Double-clutching will, if done properly, eliminate any additional wear of the synchronizers and if the engine is running at just the right speed before you engage the clutch after the ...


5

Some answers correctly identified wear of synchronizers as a possible concern on manual transmission cars, but then they offered double-declutching as a solution. However, it is very hard to correctly judge the amount to press the gas pedal, making it very likely that you're either over-revving or under-revving the engine. Thus, there is some wear on the ...


5

Using up your clutch to slow down all the time? Replacing your clutch will cost you several hundred bucks, and unless you have a lot of special equipment, you won't be able to do it yourself. Any time you use your transmission for accelerating, you wear down the clutch, throwout bearing, gears, synchros, and bearings. If you use the transmission to slow ...


5

Its fairly common for these to burn out sockets for the bulbs, and even often on both sides at the same time. The socket can be removed asa separate piece, and it is fairly likely melted and/or burned


5

Is it possible to bleed the clutch hydraulics? (I don't remember if the Jeep has that option off the top of my head.) If so, this is where I'd look first. If not, I believe you need to replace them. It seems as though the clutch is not quite letting go when you depress the pedal. The five seconds gives it enough time to spin down. The fact that you can drive ...


5

There is one other thing that can cause what you are describing. There is either a pilot bearing or a pilot bushing that supports the input shaft of the transmission. I don't know which, but if it is a bushing, it would make sense based on your description. If the borrowers slipped the clutch quite a bit and were in a position to use the clutch a lot, ...


5

If we're ruling out the possibility of a leak in the system and you're still not getting cold air then it's probably due to normal wear/age. The refrigerant system is supposed to be a sealed system, but this is rarely perfect. If the AC system has never been serviced or it's been many years (6+) since it has been you could be just experiencing normal ...


5

You need either a digital storage oscilloscope or a noid light to test signal from the PCM to the injectors. If you don't have a DSO you will also need a multi-meter. You want to disconnect an injector, check the connector for fit and check the pins for corrosion etc... Injectors have 2 wires. Shared power and PCM ground. Power will always be the same ...


5

The height from the ground to the bottom of the ball will be determined by the trailer you're pulling, not the car. The height of the trailer is such that the trailers hitch is horizontal with the ground, while the hitch receiver on all vehicles is attached to two points on the frame of the car, so the receiver height is fixed for the car - e.g my Subaru ...


5

Devin- Jeeps are off-road vehicles are NOT meant to have a soft ride. With that being said, no matter what tire you throw on it the ride quality will not change in this way. When I bought my Wrangler, I had the same tires you are referring to- Goodyear Wranglers. After about a year I swapped my tires to 265/75 r16 BFG All Terrain TA KO2 (original rim). I ...


5

tl dr: It sounds like you have a bad caliper. The way calipers work is the seal doubles as the retracting device. When the piston (which is basically a cylinder inside the caliper body) is pushed out by the hydraulic force of the brake fluid as you press on the pedal, the piston moves out of the housing and sort of takes the seal with it. The seal gets ...


4

Same problem, but another forum suggested that the key in their 98 GC can be removed one click past the OFF position, in the ACC on position. Sure enough, I checked mine and found the battery drain was due to the key switch being left in ACC and then being removed. The key shouldn't come out there but it does. I screwed a small metal bracket to stop the ...


4

I have three Wranglers, and there are plenty of places on them to squeak, and not all of them have grease nipples. The most common places that will cause a squeak on the Wrangler, in order of likeliness) Track Bar bushings (rubber bushings, no grease point) Tie rod ends at the axle (usually grease points at both ends) Drag Link (usually greasable at both ...


4

If the tail lights were hot during the swap you may have broken the filiments. Bumping a bulb that is on or been on recently can cause the filiments to fail. Remove the bulbs hold them up to a light and see if the filimant is intact.


4

So you need to find out where on your drive train. Get your Jeep up off the ground so you can drive the wheels, and have a listen. Likely places: Differential Universal joints on axles Tire rubbing on bodywork Brake pad rubbing against disc


4

When the steering wheel is at the end of its travel (completely left/right) it is normal that the power steering pump starts making some extra noise At max travel, the steering pump will produce its maximum pressure and will have to work the hardest. This will create a "hissing" type noise. When the fluid level is low, then you will hear the pump moaning ...


4

Depends a wee bit on whether it is a cable throttle linkage or fly-by-wire. It being a Jeep, I'm assuming cable here. First thing I would check when looking at throttle response is that the throttle cable has no slack in it. If it is slack, the first pedal movement will just take up that slack. As @BobCross commented, this will also lead to your top ...


4

Sounds to me like you are not making connection to the battery (maybe this is what you mean by "dead short"?). I would look at your contact points ... both sides of the battery, ground, and starter to ensure you are making good contact. If you have side posts (assuming you do), these have a tendency of not making complete contact even when tightened. Make ...


4

I have struggled with the Death Wobble in my 2003 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon. It would only happen at EXACTLY 45 MPH, but once it started it would continue +/- 20 MPH. Once past 45, it would not start unless I hit a bump. If I replaced the steering stabilizer ($40 on eBay), then it would subside for ~2-3 months, but always return. Things I tried that didn't ...


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