10

True for some axles. Given the different bearing designs between the inner and out CV joint. The CV joints will include the required grease when purchased. The color depends more on the manufacturer than anything. There are aftermarket (read: Valvoline, Castrol, etc) greases that can be used in the inner and outer cv joint.


7

The ball bearings are involved, but the noise isn't because they are dropping. What happens is when the boot splits, the grease starts oozing out (less lubricant) and dirt gets in causing wear. One of the jobs of grease is to take up excess slack in the joint (not that there is much in the first place when it's not worn out). This will quiet any noises out ...


7

Its not uncommon for the control arm bushings on many Hondas/ Acuras to expire quickly. It is however a bit dangerous to drive with them if they are starting to wear down or dry rot. They harden when this happens and cause other components on your suspension and sub-frame to fail. The lateral and vertical shaking of your car will cause something to give ...


6

No, exploding axles are not a normal thing. Return to the shop that replaced them, there should be a warranty on them. Either: the axles were defective the axles weren't installed properly the axles were the incorrect ones for your vehicle


5

The answer to the first bullet. The roll of the CV or constant velocity joint is to enable movement with independent suspension. As the geometry changes (when you hit a bump), the wheel moves up. If the axle were solid, this would be unable to happen. The CV joint allows for the movement of the suspension. I guess you could think of it like a swivel socket. ...


4

My father had the exact same problem that you describe on his 2007 Honda CR-V and it turned out to be a drive shaft. Apparently they fail quite regularly on this model. Replacing the shaft resolved the issue.


4

Axle removed! The idea of banging on the axle bolt is a bad one if the axle is really stuck. Strong taps to dislodge are probably fine but above a certain degree of force, the inner threads on the axle will strip. I resolved this by using a half-inch drive 19mm socket with a short extension. The length and diameter combination allows you to transmit the ...


4

Also look for traces of CV grease on the drive shaft and around the CV joint itself. If the boot has been tampered with recently its likely there will be giveaway traces of grease or lubed/shiny areas to be seen, as CV grease is rather hard to get rid of without leaving any traces of work being done.


4

If you look to the very right in this image: You'll see a snap ring. This holds the end of the axle in the transmission. To get it out, you need to wedge something like a long flat tip screwdriver or pry bar in between the transmission case and axle, and pop it free. It will take a little bit of finagling, but it will pop out. Don't pull on the axle shaft ...


3

As long as the bearings etc were kept clean and everything was in the same position from where it came, you should be fine.. The only thing that may occur if the bearings or cup have rotated before refitting is perhaps premature wear of the joint, as the bearings will now be wearing in a different manner to their previous wear pattern. I wouldn't worry too ...


3

If the outer cv joint is stuck in the wheel bearing, remove the nut and spray with a good quality rust solvent and let set a few hours, re soak several times. My favorite is Rusty by Kent Shake very well before using. Either use a large brass hammer on the end of the cv joint to push it out of the bearing, or put a sacrifice axle nut on the end of the ...


3

There should be no grease in the boot. The CV joint casing doesn't need packing fully with grease. Pack enough in to cover all the moving parts. If a sachet of grease is included in the kit, then there usually is enough for one joint.


3

Clean off the bulk of the grease with rags, then dump them in a bucket of solvent (gas, kerosene, parts cleaner, mineral spirits). Seafoam or brake cleaner also work, but they're more expensive. Let them sit for a bit, then pull them out, wipe them clean with another rag, re-grease and reassemble.


2

Depending on your jurisdiction, it may be illegal. In the UK, the condition of these "dust covers" is now inspected and any degradation is considered a fail. When you consider the cost to replace these as opposed to having them fail during operation, I don't think there is a good argument not replace them.


2

Should the procedure for this car be same as a 2004 Impreza? I think I would use this video for direction. Should the axle nut be loosened before or after lifting the car? If you are not replacing the wheel bearing, then no. I saw on your video where it says that you can cause damage to the wheel bearing by doing it with the car on the ground. ...


2

The balls do not "click from side to side". As the balls shrink due to wear they are no longer thick enough to prevent the bearing spacer from hitting the joint housing as it passes by the housing. a joint with proper specs will not click at all, even when dry.


2

More than likely the sound the car is making is the wheel bearing or the rotor hitting, torque spec for the front axle nut is 158 ft.lbs. The C1422 probably occurred from a low voltage situation and the sensor needs to be re-calibrated. C1413 is probably due to the axle nut being loose.


2

If in doubt, replace it - it'll be a lot better for your peace of mind! Plus, as Steve says, it may be illegal in your jurisdiction and /or fail any roadworthyness test - and if you were in an accident because it failed, and they could prove you knew about it beforehand, they'd throw the book at you... I'd also get the alignment of the various suspension ...


2

Many times a CV boot can be torn or cracked without anyone knowing. This can allowing dirt and moisture into the joint which can cause excessive wear, binding, corrosion and premature failure. Yes, clicking is a common indicator, but sometimes, they just get worn to the point they bind up, then let go. And they can also just simply be defective. You have ...


2

If the bearing didn't come with grease, or a recommendation for grease, I'd be inclined to use high temperature wheel bearing grease.


2

No, they are not any good. I once had a car with cracked rubber in the CV boot. It was replaced by a mechanic, and they replaced the grease as well. However, the repair didn't last the test of time and the thing that held the CV boot in place cracked in half after few years of use. So, I then repaired with a zip tie temporarily and drove the car to a garage ...


2

Easiest ways to check if your problem is from CV joints are those: Turn your wheel to the side and accelerate, if you hear clicking/clacking sounds it's the CV joint. Go under the car and look for grease or damaged boot. Turn your wheel to one side, go next to the tire hold the axle and shake it while listening for clicking sounds and checking for a lot of ...


2

I would use a "listening stick" - long screwdrivers work or a stethoscope... Both of which I have used with success, but identifying noise and isolating exactly which is responsible is an arcane art and mistakes are still possible...


2

Differentiating between wheel bearing noise and CV joint noise is difficult. Several times, I have replaced wheel bearings at the owner's direction, only to find later that the problem was the CV joint. With the wheel up, I would see if there is ANY play in the wheel horizontally or vertically. If not, my experience would say that it is more probable that ...


1

CV joints are affected by alignment angles, the reason they have joints to begin with is they compensate for independent movement of each wheel. if you ride on a high surface on one side of the car and the other side is lower, then each CV joint will compensate for those angles, within reason. If the vehicle in question is aggressively lowered then id say it ...


1

Yes, it is showing signs of failing so do it while the opportunity is there - otherwise you pay for labor twice to do it later...


1

Sure, control arms and constant velocity (CV) shaft assemblies do wear out. Grab a flashlight, a pair of jack stands and a floor jack. Jack the car up safely onto the jack stands. Never, ever, never work under a car that is just propped up by a jack. grab a flashlight. carefully inspect the constant velocity shafts for wear at the CV joints. Grab the ...


1

The axle can, and usually does, outlast the rubber boot. Many cv joints have the boot replaced and with fresh grease go on for years. The time to replace an axle / cv joint is usually only when it develops a fault, but if you are doing a serious rebuild then some may consider replacing them « just because »...


1

OK I was able to get everything to work out. I looked all over the internet and that shaft part is impossible to replace. I even looked into ordering it from Japan. It is a MOPAR export part that seems to be discontinued. Anyway, I took my damaged part to a mechanic. He was able to file and sand down the splines. I used some lubrication and I was able to ...


1

If it is rhythmic to the speed of the tire and stops when you brake, check the brakes. They make noise when they need attention. If it's a clacking type sound, likely the brake pads are worn and need to be replaced and are rattling in their seats. You could also be missing one of the clips that holds the brake pad in place (they're poorly made little ...


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