12

You need to replace the cable as there is corrosion inside of the cable. There is no way to get rid of the corrosion, so replacement is your only option. The corrosion increases resistance going through the cable, which means it won't be as efficient as it should be. Heat can generate, which if it gets bad enough, might cause a fire. Butt welding (if that's ...


11

To directly answer this question, no it won't work and you run the risk of damaging your alternator if it is good while doing so. The test you are asking about was used quite successfully with generators, but should not be used with alternators. Alternators are internally regulated. When you pull the battery lead, you run the risk of killing the regulator. I'...


9

After cleaning the terminals with a small amount of baking soda (approx a tbsp and enough water to make a paste ) and a old toothbrush. I recommend wearing gloves to protect your hands from the acid salt and lead from the terminal. The acid deposits are normal. Assuming negative ground: When installing the battery connect the positive first. The car ...


8

This is a body ground. This is not the main ground, but will affect how anything attached to the ground will work. This might mean your radio or your lights might not work. It might mean the computer in your car (if it has one) won't work. There are any of a hundred things which could go wrong, but you should still be able to jump your vehicle. With this ...


8

Agree with @resident_heretic about the order of removing/installing the posts. Remove the negative first and reconnect last when changing out the battery. This prevents shorting the positive battery terminal to ground while swinging a wrench to tighten things. Something which has not been talked about, in a more generic sense (so this is for any vehicle), ...


6

Hydrogen is released when a typical car battery is charging. When you remove one jump lead after starting there could be a spark which ignites that hydrogen. It is unlikely to be when you attach the cables – the battery is not at that point being charged. If you attach one cable to a bare metal point on the frame that is not right next to the battery, there ...


5

In a word: Absolutely The lack of material means a lack of electron flow. You won't get the proper charge of the battery, the right amount of power out of it come starting time, nor the full buffering effect a battery provides to the electrical system. It is a lose/lose/lose situation here. Replace it. It doesn't have to be exactly the same type. In fact, I'...


5

I have not been able to find a parts diagram for your model (likely because of the region I live in), so I will explain how to tell which cable is which. If you trace it back, one will attach to the chassis for a ground. That is the negative battery cable (I would check the one with the two small flanges first). The thicker one, with the "L" shaped ...


4

The major cause of terminal corrosion is moisture. Even a small amount of water getting into small gaps or spaces where the metal surfaces touch can lead to electrolysis, which will erode the metal. This in turn creates larger gaps, which allow more moisture to accumulate, causing the problem to grow worse over time. A common method for preventing this is ...


4

Replacing a battery is as simple as: disconnecting the 2 battery terminals removing the old battery inserting the new battery reconnecting the 2 battery terminals Cleaning the "contacts" is something you do when it is needed. Healthy batteries usually do not make deposits outisude. Batteries of lesser quality tend to corrode more easily or more quickly, ...


3

They gave good advice except not the body ie a painted surface - use a big clean bolt or engine mount.


3

What you described will work fine. There are several options out there to replace terminals. You wouldn't be the first one with corroded cables/terminals. IF the cable is still good... There are several products on Amazon that will work, just make sure you get something that'll fit the wire gauge you're dealing with. There are charts out there which ...


3

Depends on the design of your jumper cables, but I would have tried or or rotate 90 degrees and go under that lip at the back Of course your black negative lead would be to a lifting lug directly on the stranded engine, and not the battery. Another option is a lug somewhere on the chassis or similar.


3

It sounds like you've installed the jumper cables directly, however, you need to let the donor vehicle charge your battery for a while before trying to actually start the vehicle. Most jumper cables do not have the ability to pass the amount of current needed to actually start the vehicle, but they do have the ability to assist in charging the battery so it ...


3

If your goal is to hold the cable in place and to avoid chaffing, then you need a clamp that will grasp the cable. They make the same clamps you've pictured in 3/8" which would be a little snug, but wouldn't allow movement. The larger cables have more insulation (typically), so the snug fit should not damage it. These work great. I have used these in ...


3

Check out this manual. I don't think your battery is lithium; it's most likely a sealed lead acid battery (SLA, sometimes referred to as AGM, or absorbent glass mat). They tend to be a lot smaller than regular car batteries in terms of dimensions (I have some that are about 3"x4"x5") but are much heavier than lithium batteries would be. https://onedrive....


3

Here's an easier and safer way to test an alternator. Get a multimeter With the car on but all accessories off, read the voltage between the battery terminals (a healthy alternator will read about 14V) With the car on and all electrical accessories on, read the voltage again (a healthy alternator will read about 13V)


2

The method posted by OP for testing an ALTERNATOR will likely destroy perfectly good parts of you vehicle, not the least of which being the alternator. This method should never be attempted in a computer controlled vehicle (basically any vehicle after the 70s). The proper way to test an alternators function is by performing what is known as a "full field" ...


2

Theory: Theoretically they would share the load assuming an even contact on the clamps. Since metals in generally have an positive temperature coefficient of resistance the leads automatically distribute the current equally. Practice: My gut feeling tells me that a significant part of the resistance "happens" on the clamps, so it would be difficult to ...


2

It sounds like you've flattened your battery by listening to the radio without the engine running. If this was only a few minutes, it may be that your battery is in poor health and due for replacement anyway. If you obtained a reading of 18 volts from your multimeter, I'd suggest replacing that too as a 12 volt battery should never produce such a high ...


2

I had the same problem was turning the key and nothing happened it was dead. So I took negative terminal off battery and put it back on and started fine. Then it happened again and it turned out to be the earth lead running to the body of the car, cleaned it up and put it back on and hasn't happened since. Great car on fuel but that's about it the paint is ...


2

If all you can get is 16mm² cable, then put two of them in parallel. 2x16mm² would have a lot higher current carrying capacity than 1x28mm² cable. The other thing I would check would be that the new cables had similar thickness strands of copper, so that they have similar flexibility


2

This ended up being a bad negative terminal connected to the battery. The vibration at engine start was just enough to disrupt the connection. When I jumped the car, the clamp secured the terminal and the connection -- and, of course, the extra juice helped too. I confirmed at the dealership (don't judge) that the alternator and starter are fine. Make sure ...


2

Using silicone grease before you shrink the tube is not a problem,except the shrink tube might slide off easier. A better solution than using grease is probably to get shrink tube that has glue on the inside,i know it cost a bit more but after you have shrinked it on it will not go anywhere. It is this type https://www.amazon.com/Ancor-Marine-Electrical-...


2

If you attempt to cut this wire for repair, disconnect battery negative first to prevent blowing a fuse or becoming an arc welder. That looks like 10 gauge wire and if there's enough slack, cutting out the corroded part, stripping back insulation and either meshing the clean ends together or use a plain butt connector crimped onto both ends of wires, solder ...


2

After disconnecting the negative battery terminal, if you cut out the corroded section of wire and then make a proper solder joint -- which begins with a secure physical connection between the wires to be joined -- the resistance of the soldered cable will for all practical purposes be indistinguishable from the original wire. Yes, solder has a higher ...


1

You use grease on terminals to protect them from corrosion due to oxygen exposure, the shrink tubing will do the same job so there's no point putting grease inside. In fact, the grease is more likely to get squeezed into the wrong place and prevent a good seal, so my advice is not to use it.


1

Or the positive terminal. It is typically the ultimate connection that makes the spark capable of igniting something. Jump starting procedure: Connect the positive terminal of the good car with the positive terminal of the bad car. which terminal you connect the jump lead clamp to first is relatively immaterial. I personally do the bad car first because ...


1

You can make either or both negative electrical connections to the frame instead of the battery. When connecting, you must make the last (fourth) connection that way, because either battery can make hydrogen. When disconnecting, remove the first connection at a place away from the battery. Going from the 3rd to 4th connection is what causes the spark (...


1

Defeating the object ! Paint isn't a good electrical conductor - not even metallic paint ! The idea is that sometimes, when a battery has been charging, and therefore giving off explosive gases, any spark near is likely to cause a big bang. I did it as a teenager - only once, as it cost me a new battery and very nearly my health. So the sensible thing to ...


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