Hot answers tagged

34

No, the salesman was spot on. If you think about it, bulbs are designed to last about the same amount of time. If they are installed in pairs, then the secondary light which matches the first will most likely be on the road to death just as the first. This holds mostly true for higher output lights, like your headlights. Marker lights, being a much lower ...


13

If the battery dies whilst driving, but you can jump it off another car, you want to look at the alternator first (possibly followed by the battery, the wiring and any large loads, because either your battery is not charging or something is draining it faster than the alternator can charge it) An alternator should give somewhere over 13 volts (often 14.5) ...


12

There is a screw behind the pop out cover, used to remove the door panel. This may not be exact match to your car, for example only. Image thanks to Jason C.


7

Lightbulb failure is a random event, which is not pre-set to happen after X hours of service or before a certain date. It is provoked by stress from vibration, repeated heating up and cooling down and voltage spikes above nominal voltage. Having said that, lightbulbs have a predictable ageing process where their filament gradually thins out via evaporation. ...


6

You can use this method to pull certain types of dents. Here is one method to resolve the dent issue. Dent Pulling glue these plastic ding tabs to the center of the dent. You can find them by googling "plastic ding tab" You will use a hot glue gun and hot glue them to your dent. Use a dent puller slide hammer. The tip should screw into the plastic ...


6

It's an interior temperature sensor for cars with automatic A/C. This is on my car, a Mitsubishi Lancer it's not in the same location but it serves the same purpose.


5

I would bet the electronic speed sensor in the transmission is malfunctioning. It should look something like this: It suggests it is located at the top of the transmission, so should be fairly easy to get to. One plug, one bolt.


4

It looks like your car may have drum brakes as an option. If so and if you left the parking brake on while it was parked corrosion may have caused one of the pads to freeze partly in place. Pull the rear brake drums and see if everything is moving as it should.


4

Your best bet appears to be the firewall pass-through behind the gas pedal. That should allow you to run behind the dash fairly directly.


4

So it could be a number of things: the pads could need grease on the NON-braking side (i.e. the side that doesn't touch the rotors), the caliper pins could be sticking, the brake pad guide plates could be dirty and causing the pads to stick, or your caliper piston itself could be sticking slightly. Greasing the backs of the pads is pretty self-explanatory. ...


4

I think you already figured it out. Since it doesn't touch anything and the E-brake doesn't hook up to it, It is almost certainly a counterweight or dampner of some kind. If the caliper doesn't weigh enough (or weighs too much), it can cuz squealing and juttering under load. I can't find a link that corroborates this information, so- As an example, the ...


4

That code is for "Intake Manifold Runner Performance Bank 1". That does not automatically mean the manifold needs to be replaced. These are the common reasons for the code; Intake manifold runner control actuator failure Powertrain Control Module (PCM) failure Restricted vacuum lines I'd start with #3 to see if it is as simple as a vacuum line. The other ...


4

While I completely agree with what @JPhi1618 says as the reasons for the lip being there, I disagree with his assessment as to if you should replace this. While it's not very large, these do help with airflow through the radiator. Even the smallest lip creates a low pressure zone behind it which helps bring air down through the radiator while moving. This ...


4

There's a few things you can use to try and work it out if you can't get hold of a Kia dealer to decode the VIN. Assuming the specs match the US versions then you can probably puzzle it out from the options: Engine: If it's the 2.4 then that narrows it down to LX, EX or SX spec, the 2.0T means it's SX Turbo or SXL Turbo. Wheels: If it's 16" Wheels then ...


4

To answer your questions: Yes, this does appear to be a heat shield In general, auto manufacturers don't include anything in the car that they don't need to: this eats into their profits. That being said, it'd be a guessing game as to whether this heat shield was added in order to improve the customer's driving experience (i.e. by reducing the amount of ...


4

In contrast to the other contributors I have never replaced both headlights at the same time. I am 64 years old and have been replacing my own lights since I had my first car. You will sometimes get a year or more of service out of the other headlight after you replace it's mate. Headlights, like any other lightbulb have a high degree of quality and ...


3

My guess would be that the grayish colored piece slides onto the black baseplate. It appears to be held in place by the three dimples fitting into a detent. I would insert a small screwdriver between the two humps shown in the first photo. With a twisting motion see if the gray plate slides toward the dash. You may have to try several size screwdrivers to ...


3

Sounds like a failing A/C compressor. Assuming the car has A/C... A/C compressor is used with the defroster to dry the air.


3

Or could be a bad ignition switch.


3

That sounds like an immobiliser problem to me. What happens if you get out, lock, then unlock the van, then try again? Another possible problem is a loose wire between the ignition switch and the solenoid, but in that case I'd expect it to need physical intervention before it would work again (i.e. knocking or wiggling the wire to remake contact)


3

One way round your problem would be too have a second battery, together with diode pack and wiring to charge it independantly. If your intention is too camp out in remote areas, you really dont want to saddle the vehicles system with any loads. Alternatively a generator for your machine. A continuous 6amp load overnight is quite a high demand on a regular ...


3

It sounds like a blown head gasket ... I'm surprised your mechanic didn't suggest that to you. If there is no sign of visible leakage, it has to be going somewhere. There are only two other places for it to go. Into the crankcase or out the tail pipe getting burnt. You should be able to smell and see it coming out the tail pipe (you may see signs of ...


3

No. Reusing the radiator cap (almost certainly) didn't cause the water pump failure. The advice to replace the cap is probably based on the logic that the cap is a relatively inexpensive part and renewing it helps to ensure the integrity of the pressurized cooling system. An independent mechanic will often try to use her/his judgment to balance cost and ...


3

Give the car a jump start, but let the leads from the donor vehicle stay on the new battery for a period of time. Check the battery to ensure there is sufficient charge in it (at least 12vdc) to keep the vehicle running. Get the Sedona started and then pull the leads from the donor vehicle. Check the voltage at the battery. If the voltage continues to drop ...


3

The story as told here doesn't make a lot of sense to me in the UK (I assume it is the UK, from the reference to MOT and presumably the DVLA website at Gov.uk). If the car was involved in an accident and the police were called to the scene, the police would have called a towing company to clear the road and put the car in safe storage somewhere, if in ...


3

I think that your left and center brake filaments have blown. The left and right bulbs will have 2 filaments, one for the tail (side) light and one for the brake light. Only the brake filament will have blow in the left one, so allowing the tail light to continue to work. When this brake filament broke, the body control unit (BCU) recognized it and lit ...


2

In case of erratic no start, try this as we had the same problem. Inside electricals worked, we had horn, headlights, wipers, radio, etc. But starter just clicked as though there was dirty terminal ends or possible dead cell in battery. Jumping with another vehicle did not make any difference. Long story short. Battery was fine and starter bench tested ...


2

The following was suggested by someone else on another website and worked for me!! After being towed several times, now I just pull the relay out and plug it back in. Takes only a minute or two and I have done it about 10 times now. When the vehicle doesn't start, I simply go to the fuse panel under the steering wheel and remove the relay labeled "...


2

There is a strong possibility there is an issue in the interior fuse box which is also the body module. There is a problem often seen with the burglar alarm relay (built into the box/module, not replaceable). This relay doesn't sound the alarm, but disables the car. Locking and unlocking the car making it work seems to confirm it. You can also try to start ...


2

It sounds to me that a leak in the refrigerant lines is a likely culprit. It gradually getting worse would be the gradual loss of the refrigerant as it leaked out. The hiss you are hearing now I would suspect is pressure created by the compressor being engaged and coming out of the point of the leak. If you just get it refilled, you will probably end up ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible