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98

The ONLY time you should crawl under a car is when it is supported by a jack stand or on a lift. A jack is used to jack the car up and let it down. It is a huge safety concern to use it to support the car while crawling under it. You can kick the tire from the outside of the car if it won't come off, but keep your body parts away from underneath the car. ...


77

Physical safety Modern cars are amazingly more safe than classic cars. Guys that are into classic cars frequently throw around phrases like "They don't make them like they used to!" or "This is built like a tank with real American Steel!", but when you look at a classic car in an accident, the results are pretty obvious. In 2009 this crash test was done ...


69

For the most part, they don't need it. The purpose of the air bag is to protect the occupant as the body is thrown forward in a crash. Most racers have such vastly improved safety equipment over what is available in a standard road worthy automobile, they don't need air bags. The things you'd need to take into account are things like a five-point harness, ...


51

If you are ever lucky enough to drive a competition car, the first thing that will strike you is that you can't move. Once you're in your bucket seat with your fire retardant overalls on, wearing a full face helmet and neck brace and strapped firmly in with your multipoint harness, you'll feel like you've been pinned to the seat. You can't look over your ...


51

There is no such thing as "absolutely, perfectly, 100% safe." Each tool has its proper and improper uses, and each works either in parallel with other tools to increase safety and dependability, or in series with other tools ultimately reducing safety and reliability. Will a hydraulic jack hold up a car safely? That depends on the level of risk you're ...


46

If you can open the door, do it Then unbuckle, and bail out. If your car has sunroof and it works, open it and exit from it Your car electrics need to be functioning for this to work though. On some cars like VW's you can pop off an inner roof panel to reveal a hand crank to open the sunroof. Detach the headrest, use it to shatter the window glass¹ If ...


38

Get an emergency escape tool For being proactive, the best option is a emergency glass breaking device with a seatbelt cutter like this model: (Click image to enlarge) The Mythbusters have done two episodes on escaping a vehicle in water, and in the second episode, one of the camera men had to have his belt cut off him because he became suck when the car ...


38

Yes, you do have something to worry about. Even with a lot of weight on a jack, the jack could move, either back and forth, or side to side, and the whole shebang could pivot down until the car rests on the ground. Hydraulic jacks are indeed easier to use, but even they can fail. Would you like to be lying underneath when one of the hydraulic seals lets go ...


34

The only advice anyone could possibly give about this tire is that it should not be taken on the road. Out of respect for other peoples lives, the car should not be driven with even one tire like that on it.


29

No, they are not safe Safety standards dating back to before now were not as stringent as they are now. The further in time you go back the less safe they become. Safety has been driven by governments and as regulations have become more stringent over time car manufacturers have had the responsibility to conform to the compliance stack of the time. ...


26

You could always look into jack stands that are typically used for heavy duty trucks and semis. One time I had a lifted truck I had to go to Northern Tool and purchase high reaction jack stands: Item link That said I wouldn't recommend using anything other than the jack stand. Even if you are using a block that block could still break from the pressure ...


26

The lower the gear, the better the job the engine compression will do at holding the car if the brake fails, that's because a lower gear makes the engine spin faster and requires it to do more work for the car to move. So 1st is better than 2nd, between reverse and 1st it's not so obvious – but from the examples people are finding it looks like 1st is a bit ...


25

In aggregate yes, however that's not the same as saying all large vehicles are safer than all small ones. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety aggregates and publishes data about fatality rates in new vehicles in the US. You can see a general trend toward larger being safer, but bigger being safer is not guaranteed. The IIHS also publishes data ...


25

TL DR: Nope, I'd say not. When I was a young man, my Dad always told me, "Use the tool which is designed for the job." For instance, if you are trying to remove a bolt out of your suspension holding an A-Arm, you wouldn't use a body hammer to move it out, you'd use something with a little more heft, like a 5lb sledge or something similar. I'm sure if you ...


25

What you did was dangerous, there are Darwin Awards for just this type of thing! The likelihood of something going wrong is low, but the consequences are terrible if it does. There are many failure modes when jacking up a car: Scissor jacks are pretty reliable but they can fail, the ground could be unstable or the surface could collapse due to the weight. I'...


22

You've already seen the safety comparisons. With that being said, classic cars are for fun. If you're looking for safety, a classic car isn't for you. If you're looking to have fun, go for it. Like most things in life, there's a balance that you have to evaluate. No one can answer that for you. You have to do it for yourself. Are you willing to take ...


19

If it has been driving fine since then, all you have probably done is worn the brake pads down. Not fatal - but check when you pull the handbrake on that it is solidly holding the car stationary. If you notice vibration, then I'd worry about pads/disks being warped or damaged. You may find though that you need the handbrake cable to be tightened, as it may ...


19

Wood. It's plenty strong. Cut some 2x6 or 2x8 and stack them accordingly. This is the most cost effective way to solve your problem. The only danger you will encounter is if you used rotten wood. I realize the picture is not 2x6's, etc, but, it displays the idea.


19

When I'm on a hill with the front of my car facing up the hill I park the car in first and turn the wheels away from the curb so the transmission is fighting against gravity. When I'm on a hill with the front of my car facing down the hill I park the car in reverse and turn the wheels into the curb so again the transmission is fighting against gravity. ...


19

Those cracks are due to prolonged heat and UV exposure. They are a sign that the tires are old and will soon need replacing. Cracks of this size are not a safety concern in and of themselves but they symbolize loss of grip, which can be dangerous in slippery conditions when braking.


19

Here in the States, cars on showroom floors are driven on and driven off. There are large doors (triple wide as compared to normal doors) which are opened to allow them to be driven into position. The only consideration to these vehicles being put on the floor is usually putting some kind of protection for the floor just under the tires. There is a substance ...


18

The damage you are showing is minor cosmetic damage. If the following occurs with sidewall damage, then get it replaced: Tire deflation (cannot be legally repaired in most countries) You pull the flap back and see damage to the side wall plies (corded area under the rubber which supports the tire) whether deflation has occurred or not Bulging of the tire ...


18

Classic cars are significantly less safe than modern cars. In a classic car, it is both harder to avoid a crash and more likely that you will sustain serious or fatal injuries in the event of a crash. It's the former point I'd like to emphasize in this answer. First, a classic car will not have features like ABS, traction control, or stability control. This ...


18

It is my understanding that electronic parking brakes remain in whatever state they were in when the battery dies or is disconnected. The electronic system does not "hold" the brake. It simply engages and disengages it. I would put the parking brake on and block the wheels.


18

I am completely sure that it is a rollover warning label. (source: c-suvs.com) It is an official symbol, at least in the US, and it became required by the NHTSA on SUVs around 1999. From the LA Times, for example, March 1999 (emphasis mine) (archive): The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration will direct auto makers to post a graphic new ...


17

Depends how proactive you want to be. A really sensible preparation is to have a window shattering tool in your glove box. As soon as you have "finished" ending up in the water, get your seatbelt off and retrieve that tool, and pop your side window. You really want to exit the vehicle before it takes on enough water to sink - and firstly get onto the roof,...


17

Assuming you had to do this on the road (why else would you want to put a donut on?), I wouldn't go under the car no matter how steady it is, even on a jack stand on a completely flat patch of concrete. In case someone crashes into your car, you're toast. In case of a car jack, it could be enough for a big vehicle to drive close to your car and blow it out ...


16

The main purpose for this is so other drivers can see your turn signal. The LED lights are so intense, they do not allow the oncoming driver to be able to see the turn signal. By turning the LEDs off, it becomes readily apparent.


16

Hydraulic car ramps are a great option if you can source them. They give oodles of clearance by lifting the wheels themselves. You have to drive the wheels into them before using the hydraulic pump to lift the ramp. Drive-on ramps operate on a similar principle - just drive onto them


16

You're asking two different questions - are they safe, and are they as safe as a modern car. For the second question - No. An older car without all the modern safety features will not protect you, your passengers, or pedestrians as well as a modern car will in the event of a crash - You don't have airbags, crumple zones, ABS, NCAP ratings and so on. For ...


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