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6

You should be fine. Though I would recommend unplugging the connector to fuel injector #7 to minimize the amount of unburnt fuel that makes its way to the catalytic converter.


5

I checked ALLDATA. The A/C switch grounds the AC SELECT input at the Powertarain Control Module (PCM). The high (normally closed) and low (normally open) pressure switches in series (may be the same housing) ground the AC REQUEST input at the PCM. With those two inputs, the PCM sinks the AC RELAY output. This should engage the AC compressor clutch. I ...


3

According to this pdf, all pre-1998 Chrysler/Dodge vehicles should be using plain old power steering fluid. Those after 1998 should be using ATF-4 unless specified differently. NOTE: The Crossfire should use Pentosin CHF 11S.


3

You need to visually verify no spark on bank 1. If a cylinder is already misfiring disconnecting the coil won't tell you much. Pull out the #1 coil and spark plug, put the spark plug into the coil and ground the electrode with a wire lead. This should tell you if you have spark or not. This is also a good time to do a compression test. If you have no spark ...


2

AC hoses generally have very long service life which, in my experience, usually exceed the life of the vehicle. If the system passes a vacuum and/or leak test then inspecting the outside is generally all that's needed to detect if there is any impending issues about to happen (hose wise). To determine their serviceability you should check for the following ...


2

The best way to fix this is to use flared butt ended fittings, or to replace the line whole. The rubber, while it will hold, is still the weak link in the chain. Over time it will weaken and wear, and ultimately fail. Using the dual ended but joint like I have pictured below (or something like this), if installed correctly, will not fail any sooner than the ...


2

While you have that spark plug out, i would highly recommend doing a compression check on that cylinder while you have everything off/out.


2

The P2096 is very likely related to your issue, it indicates that the fuel system is running too lean, i.e. there's not enough fuel in the fuel/air mix. One of the symptoms of this is can be hesitant acceleration. Usually this is a problem with fuel supply, like a fuel pump not providing enough pressure or a fuel filter restricting flow, although there are ...


2

You should make sure that both sides are identical, from suspension arms to hubs, brake discs, calipers and pads. If not, then eccentric braking may be the cause of an accident and you may be liable if, and when, the insurance investigates. You are responsible, in most places, for the safe condition of your vehicle.


2

Here are the pinouts for the truck harness side of the O2 sensors, upstream and downstream. This should give you a sense of wire color and clock location in the plug. You may need to go to the parts store and take a picture of an undamaged O2 sensor to get things connected properly.


1

Lolly stick with sticky tape... but look at the grille - there may be plugs or the edge shape may indicate it is held down by hidden clips. Make one stick with the tape securely connected with a long tongue. Use a second stick to push the tape onto the phone. Then it is down to dexterity and being able to visualise the situation - working « blind » is a ...


1

A common cause of multiple pump failures is debris in the system. The first pump fails depositing shrapnel in the fluid. Without a complete flush of the system the debris will contaminate and destroy the new pump and the cycle starts again.


1

It's also possible that there are two leaks. Do the two fluids smell the same? Definitely not likely, but possible. Short of that, based on the pics I'm going to say it's likely a power steering hose that's leaking, and that the leak is likely somewhere near the pump. The reason that I say that is there is fluid going both up (underside of the hood) and ...


1

It looks like it may be transmission or power steering fluid. Both of which are oil-based and similar in color. Coolant may also be red or pink but is not oily. Check your power steering pump and the lines to see if there is a leak, most likely on the pressurized side. As far as transmission fluid, the only thing that I can think of would be a leaking ...


1

I dont know, but if you said you had fix a leak before in the steering system which liquid is pink, and the fluid that spill out every where is pink, most probably is steering fluid, unless you have a hole in the transmission of course.


1

If your truck has bubble flare type terminations, you need to use same same for the replacement. If you don't, you have to know it will leak. It really doesn't matter what the "book" says when what's staring you in the face is the answer. Neither end of the connection (male or female) is double flare.


1

You can use proper hose without a problem. Just make sure it's SAE J1532 or J1019 hose - it should be stenciled on the sides - most auto parts stores sell this "transmission cooler line hose" by the foot. You'll likely need 3/8 or .325 ID. Make sure there's 2-3 inches of overlap on each end of the cut metal. Double clamp each end with quality clamps ...


1

Based on the tests performed, the most probable cause is lack of spark to the Bank 1 cylinders. I would not be worried about the lambda sensors or a jumped timing chain. I would look for an open in a wire that is common to the driver side coils, power-side or ground-side.


1

The thrust bearing which is listed in some of the kits is a "nice to have", but isn't needed every time. They do not normally wear out, so replacing them is probably on a case-by-case basis. I'd take a look at the old thrust plate and see if there is any galling on it. If so, then replace the plate and the needle bearings. If it looks good with minimal wear ...


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