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31

It isn't something restricted to old vehicles; my Lumina has fans like this, though not as irregular as the picture shown in the question. As far as I can recall, the chief reason cited for this by the manufacturer is noise reduction. You'll notice the additional weight on some of the blades to ensure that rotational balance is maintained despite the ...


12

If you would like to do that by the use of solar panels, the problem is power. A typical car AC probably uses somewhere between 1000 and 3000 watts. A square meter of typical photovoltaic cells generates roughly 150W of power. Even if you covered the entire car with solar panels, they wouldn't be sufficient to power the AC completely under perfect ...


9

I'm sure you could manage to measure the amount of energy wasted by your condenser fan, but I promise you it's statistically insignificant. If you're trying to save an amp or two or power, it would make more sense to make sure you don't have any lights on or that you're not carrying any heavy objects you don't need in your trunk. That said, the most ...


8

You have a great idea! And it IS being done. Certain models of the Toyota Prius feature an optional solar roof that powers interior fans that automatically engage when the interior gets too warm. The hybrid batteries are not even used at all: the fans run strictly on solar power! Cool (literally). Image Source: resilience.org


6

Since nobody even went to this realm, I thought it might be a good idea to answer. When driving the vehicle, the fans only provide as much air flow through the radiator as if you were moving ~35 mph (in most vehicles). Once you get past this speed, the fans are no longer a factor. Infact, in most cases, the air moving through the radiator is actually ...


6

Great question. It sounds like the problem is linked to the coolant level, and not the AC. I'm not familiar with the plumbing in this particular cooling system, but it is definitely normal for the fan to kick on after you turn off the car to continue pulling air through the radiator to help cool the coolant, but usually only when the outside temperatures ...


5

Get rid of the extra fans. If you're having to run fans constantly to keep the engine at the right temperature in the city, then all you're doing is masking another issue. You probably have several other issues. The engine temperature and the transmission going being able to shift into overdrive should be independent. It seems like you are conflating two ...


5

I checked ALLDATA. The A/C switch grounds the AC SELECT input at the Powertarain Control Module (PCM). The high (normally closed) and low (normally open) pressure switches in series (may be the same housing) ground the AC REQUEST input at the PCM. With those two inputs, the PCM sinks the AC RELAY output. This should engage the AC compressor clutch. I ...


4

My 92 Civic VX fan was intermittently noisy. Removed it and discovered it was 1/3 full of leaves. Cleaned it and works like new. Took 15 minutes (would have been half that time if I was as limber as I was 30 years ago).


4

The heat up is probably due to an air pocket inside the cooling system on the engine side. You may try parking the car on an incline with the front pointing uphill, then see if you can add more coolant. You can also see if there is a coolant bleed valve as @Lathejockey81 suggests.


4

The squirrel cage has broken fin(s), or the motor bearing has gone (most likely on a '99), or the case has distorted -- all of which allow the unit to vibrate or slightly rub on a part of the case. If you remove the glovebox and plastic the kick panel underneath it, you can press various places on the housing and case to see if the noise changes... if it ...


4

The Engine Control Module has multiple outputs to control at least 3 different relays that control the two fans on the radiator/condenser area. Each fan has 4 wires, and a HI and LO speed. The exact control strategy I could not discover, but the ECU uses a variety of input signals and internal variables to determine how much "fan" should be turned on for ...


4

The problem you have is efficiency. Solar panel efficiency runs about 10-20%, depending on the type used. Air conditioners range in efficiency, about 30% efficiency is a good working figure. What this means is that it takes 3.3 times the energy to cool your car for every unit of heat you remove. Solar panel efficiency means you need about 6.6 times the ...


4

There are a few causes of overheating that wouldn't be fixed by your previous repairs. System not pressurising: The radiator cap needs to seal pressure in. If it doesn't, your coolant will boil at a lower temperature than intended, preventing it from flowing through the system properly. Check your rad cap. Coolant temperature sensor: sometimes, they get ...


3

Not to be crass here, but you should just find one on the internet (Flex-a-lite makes a bunch of different models) which fits and follow their directions. I put one of their Monster Fan kits on my '04 Suburban. It worked very well. Measure the size of your radiator and go from there, as I doubt they make one specific for your application. The ones which ...


3

Your blower motor resistor module has blown. The fourth position provides 1:1 (full 12v) power to the fan. The other three positions provide reduced power, which allows the fan to operate at lower speeds. You can buy a replacement part relatively cheap online. This should be fairly easy to replace as well. It should easily be found under dash on the ...


3

Sounds very much like a worn blower motor so you at least have to get at the motor to find out what is worn. While you're that deep in the car you might as well replace it with a new one.


3

I did a bit more research and it looks like this link sorts my issue: http://www.blower-motor-resistor.co.uk/vauxhall-vectra-c-blower-motor-resistor.html


3

You have partially answered this yourself- you are seeing smoke, which implies the bearings are getting hot. So they could start a fire. Or in seizing up the fan could cause your wiring to catch fire. Or you could end up with a cabin full of dangerous fumes... etc You could do permanent damage, yes. Pay close attention and you might be okay. Personally, ...


3

It sounds like the blower motor has a significant mount of debre jammed into it causeing it be off-balance or possibly even broken a blade. Or, the bearing that it spins on is just worn out. Either way you'll have to pull it down and have a look at what's going on with it, it should be noticable either way. Either it has a significant amount of play in it ...


3

Replace the thermostat for sure, and while you're at it, replace the straight water with 50/50 antifreeze/coolant mix. Use the aftermarket fans ONLY during stop & go traffic in the city; on the open road they serve no purpose at all (ordinary wind from highway speed cools the radiator sufficiently in almost all cases). There's no need to remove the fans, ...


3

The Lancia Thesis, introduced back in 2001, had this system. Basically the glass in the sunroof was actually a solar panel which was used to power the A/C fan when the car was parked in direct sunlight. The more intense the sunshine, the more power for the fans, the cooler the cabin would become. This system was one of a number of things on the Lancia ...


3

Apart from the limited amount of power obtainable from a panel being less than that required to operate anything more than a fan, there are perhaps two other reasons Current solar panels are flat and rigid. Fitting one into the roof of a car may spoil its styling, or its aerodynamics, or both. By adding a panel you are increasing the weight of the car, ...


3

A simple solution You can achieve similar results by opening all doors for about ~1 minute before entering your car. All hot air inside the car will be replaced with probably still warm air from the outside. If there's no wind, you can turn on the ventilation addtionally. One minute of ventilation usually won't hurt the car battery too much. Plus, it get's ...


3

Most GM cars will not turn the cooling fan on until 230 degrees or higher. One fan should come on when the ac compressor is running regardless of engine temp, Most of the time the fan relay has failed, failure can be just a tired relay or the fan is pulling too much current due to being worn out which burns out the relay. Schematic is same for 4 cylinder or ...


3

I would not try to grease the bearings. Normally a bearing this size is sealed by either a rubber ring (designation suffix 2RS) or a steel sheet ring (designation suffix 2Z), so just slopping some grease on it wont solve the problem. Metal sheet covered bearings are protected against dust but not against moisture, rubber covered ones are protected against ...


3

This kind of problem can be tough to sort out. Let me offer a few suggestions to get started on tracking down the source: Get a helper to work with you. Have her/him start the car while you try to localize the source. Having the hood open will help. Walk around as you listen to the sound. You can use a long screw driver as a "stethoscope" to help you ...


3

The clue is that the heater core was replaced; it sounds like a classic case of the system being air-locked. You can get the scenario where a bubble of air is trapped below the level of the coolant in the header tank. This means that the coolant doesn't actually circulate even though the level looks good. Your best bet is to allow the car to cool. Remove ...


3

Fix the fan. At low speeds, the fan pulls air through the radiator (and AC condensor) and cools things off. At higher speeds, airflow takes care of that, and the fan is useless. That probably explains why everything works well when you're going faster. If the fan is not turning on, it could be a few things. Some that come to mind: Wiring harness is ...


3

If you find that the fan works when the wiring to the themro-switch is bridged (i.e. when you physically plug the wiring, the fan turns on) this would suggest that the themo-switch is at fault. This is the bit that screws into the cooling system and plugs into the fan loom where you manually switch it on. Testing the resistance of this switch at different ...


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