35

Yes. One of your brake pads on the caliper side of the brakes had been worn so far down it popped out of place. Now you are stopping using the caliper piston against the brake rotor. You will now have to not only get the brake pads and rotors replaced, but the caliper as well. If you cannot fix this yourself, you should get the vehicle towed to a repair shop....


11

It sounds like the brake pads have either completely worn through or otherwise failed, your car is not safe to drive at all. In this case you will certainly need new pads on both sides and possibly new rotors (disks) if they have been scored by metal/metal contact. Depending on exactly what has failed the calipers and pistons may be ok but they need to ...


11

Generally you don't replace calipers in pairs, only replace the damaged side. With that being said you may still not need to replace the caliper to solve your problem depending on the design. Their may be a kit that comes with new sleeves, o-rings, and grease. Replacing those will solve the problem, but again it depends on make, model, year.


10

There is no need for replacing the callipers together, as they will be heavy on your pocket, the reason why the pads and rotors are replaced together is since they work in tandem and working by rubbing against each other. The callipers on the other hand float over the entire assembly so there is no real point of changing them. You might need to change ...


10

It does sound like the caliper is not releasing, which means it is bad, or at least needs some repair. You might have corrosion on the slides, or the caliper pistons. The caliper needs to be replaced or repaired, and you will likely need to replace the pad as well. High heat in the brake caliper can cause the brake fluid to degrade, or develop air bubbles. ...


9

The operation is simpler then you might think. In broad strokes there is a screw type setup in the center of the piston. One part of the screw is loosely attached to the piston, the other part is attached to the lever. When the breaks are applied using hydraulics the piston has some degree of freedom to move beyond the length of the screw setup. If the ...


9

First of all some nitpicking: M10x26.5 isn't the correct designation: You need also the thread width. Car manufacturers are very eager to use some unusual fine threads. My personal strategy would be the following: Screw out the second bolt and go to an industrial supply shop, do not go to the DIY shops. Show them the bolt, ask for a second one and tell ...


9

No, A2 bolt is not safe. You can use the calculator here: http://www.tribology-abc.com/calculators/e3_6b.htm ...for bolts of grade 8.8 and M8 thread. It will say that the maximum tightening torque is 24.11 Nm which is less than 20 ft lbs (which would be 27.11 Nm). Now, the calculator does not have A2 as the grade of bolts, but according to this site: http://...


8

What is a freely spinning wheel? Of course, you should be able to spin the wheel by hand, but beneath the brake, bearing and transmission can apply lots of drag. My rear wheels do about 1.5 to 2 turns, my front wheels not more than half a turn when I put them in rotation by hand. While it's the same for the front wheel of my mother's car, its rear wheels ...


8

Any sort of brake fluid leak is a serious issue which needs to be fixed for several reasons. Any fluid leak means that air is also getting into the system which will accumulate and degrade braking performance. A small leak could turn into a sudden complete failure suddenly and without warning. As well as the obvious safety issue a sudden failure will be ...


8

I'm having a silimar issue with my Toyota Yaris which I'm yet to fix, but I know for sure what is causing it: rust on the ABS sensor. Every wheel has an ABS sensor which reads the wheel speed. During braking, if one of the sensors read 0 and other sensors have a different reading, the wheel is skidding, so the brake pressure must be released a little. (This ...


7

The most common cause of intermittent brake failure is a faulty master cylinder. The master cylinder is similar to a bicycle pump. It moves brake fluid instead of air. Stepping on the brake pedal moves a rod that pushes brake fluid to the wheels. If a seal is failing it may allow brake fluid to seep by it reducing the fluid pressure to the wheels. As an ...


7

Two lubes are needed to properly lubricate caliper type brakes. Silicone is used on the slider pins and anything that touches rubber. A generous amount that completely coats the pin, hole wall and rubber expansion boot is needed. Be sure to coat the boot lips that fit in the grooves that hold them in place, this act as a sealant. This lube will not swell ...


7

Yes, we see these sometimes. The source of the grease is anti squeal grease applied to the backing plates of the brake pads. It is very viscous to begin with and then stiffens further with time. Bits break off and then rock back and forth in the bottom of the piston cup with each stop start cycle. It mixes with the particles of rust in from the piston cups ...


6

I guess finished means completely outworn. This sounds like a seized caliper on that side, which always brakes a little and so wears the pads. It does not have to brake that much that you notice it, but typical signs are a hotter wheel on the one side compared to the other side after some (especially fast) driving and a wobbling noise which often occurs ...


6

To my mind, a wheel should spin freely when spun on the jack. A little noise is acceptable but if the wheel is clearly being slowed down excessively or is particularly hot after use, something is not right. As regards causes for brake drag, there do indeed include seized or sticking pistons but could also include sticky or corroded caliper slides (the pins,...


6

No, if the rotor is in good condition – no grooving and thicker than the wear limit – there is no need to replace it. If it is marginal, scored or almost down to the wear limit, then it would be a good idea to replace the rotor. The other think you want to look at is the condition of the pads. If they are significantly worn this would be an easy time to ...


6

Here's my 2 cents. If you can get a bolt that fits correctly from a hardware store, it should be acceptable for a bit. The bolts used in automotive are generally harder and more resistant to shock, shearing and twist whereas "construction" style bolts are a bit softer so that they have a little flex. If you wanted to use a construction type bolt (like what ...


6

In a properly functioning brake system the pistons in calipers must be free to move (in both directions). When brakes are applied, the fluid is under very high pressure thus generally the pistons will extend when brakes are applied given enough force on the brake pedal, but when calipers are sticking the much lower force of the rotor wobbling between brake ...


6

Your final thought is correct. Only 1 calliper was faulty. You said it that the pads on the faulty calliper had even wear, which indicates that the slider mechanism was not seized. The piston on the faulty calliper was clearly seizing out and not freeing the pads when the brake was released. If this had been on the front wheels you would likely have felt ...


6

Anything is possible, as sabotage goes it seems pretty unlikely to me as 1) it's illegal, unethical and few mechanics would take that risk and 2) it's not something they are going to make a substantial profit from. They'd have to jack it up and take the wheel off to get at it in order to mess with it, which takes time, all for a relatively minor profit. Much ...


5

Aesthetics has little to nothing to do with how well calipers function. As long as the caliper pistons do their thing and don't leak, there's no issues keeping them. There are no safety concerns with them as well. Unless the shop can point out a mechanical problem with them, the rust will not pose any issue. You usually won't see anything more than surface ...


5

It sounds to me like they cocked the piston in the caliper sideways when they collapsed it during the brake job. This could be caused from a worn caliper piston. It may or may not have been their fault, but would be hard to prove. My suggestion is to have the caliper replaced. This should fix the issue. I don't see any way this could be related to the ABS ...


5

Just because the callipers have had a rebuild does not necessarily mean that they were abused previously. Brakes as a component are prone to some of the worst wear of any component in the car. Not only do they go through tremendous heat cycles, the various chemicals in the brake pads can eventually eat at the aluminium that many callipers are made from. ...


5

Brakes become hot. Very hot. 300°C (600°F) and more is easily achieved at the disks after a hard braking from high speed. Most greases become quite thin at a higher temperature, and start to creep away from where they previously have been applied to. And the last thing you want is a grease which creeps onto the surface of the braking pad. Further more, the ...


5

tl dr: It sounds like you have a bad caliper. The way calipers work is the seal doubles as the retracting device. When the piston (which is basically a cylinder inside the caliper body) is pushed out by the hydraulic force of the brake fluid as you press on the pedal, the piston moves out of the housing and sort of takes the seal with it. The seal gets ...


5

You can perform this action with a number of 3rd party diagnostic tools such as VCDS, Carista and OBDeleven. My uncle had some success removing the electrical mechanism from the rear of the caliper too but I'd suggest against this option given the choice between taking things to bits and buying a diagnostic tool.


5

If your caliper has any brake fluid coming out of it, it's time to rebuild/replace the caliper. There should be absolutely no fluid loss anywhere in your braking system. If it is leaking at the caliper, not only is the caliper failing, but if the brake fluid gets on the rotor/pads, it won't provide much in the way of stopping, either. This is a huge safety ...


5

I agree with the accepted answer by @HandyHowie, but here is a heads-up: watch that new caliper, and check its temperature against the others in a few days and again in a few weeks. Here's why: sometimes a caliper just seems to be defective when the real culprit is the brake hose serving that caliper. The internal lining of the brake hose can collapse and ...


4

I sent a web "contact us" form to Brembo through their website around the same time that I asked this question. They appear to have forwarded it to an account manager at Race Techonolgies, LLC based in Irvine, California which is an official Brembo partner. The account manager sent me a response just today, a week after I sent my request. Brembo calipers ...


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