7

The clear coat is peeling and there is no cheap do at home product that will yield satisfactory results.The hood needs to be professionally refinished.The minor scratches may come out with a rubbing compound that is applied like regular paste wax.


7

tl dr: It isn't necessary, but it improves the quality of the polish/wax job. "Claying" (otherwise known as using a clay bar or detailing clay), is a means by which to remove contaminates from the finish of your vehicle which washing alone will not remove. The clay bar creates a shearing action, which basically cuts the contaminates off of the clear coat, ...


7

If the repair work looks shoddy, take it back to them and get it fixed. There are two very important reasons why they will get it fixed to your satisfaction: Since this is an insurance referral, they will want to have it fixed to your satisfaction. The reason being, insurance referrals are easy money and the service comes to them, rather than having to ...


5

Paint damage is caused by stone chips, hail, clumsy parking etc. "Improper washing" is so far down the list as to be unnoticeable. Sure, you're going to find a few scratches if you go over the paintwork with a microscope, the best way to cope with that is to ignore them.


5

@IHNIWID .. Yes, the "color" coat(s) need to be wet-sanded aka "color sanded". And then thoroughly cleaned of sanding dust. This needs to be perfectly smooth before clear, even if it appears dull. The quality of a mirror, for instance, is not as dependent on the glass as much as the overall flatness of the silvering reflective coating or layer. I'm not a ...


5

The likely cause is that the paint was applied too thin per coat or the nozzle was too far away. A coat thick enough to get a glossy sheen is seen but not too thick that runs develop is the proper technique. Practice on a similar surface is suggested. To fix it, sand the surface back to smooth with 600 grit sandpaper and then re-spray with three coats about ...


5

Yes, you did indeed apply an abrasive "compound". Polish materials come in coarse and finer grits just like sandpaper. To polish scratches left by a polish of a course grit finer grits are used to polish out the deeper scratches. The good news the clearcoat can, very likely, be restored to a normal smooth surface shine. You have two options: You can take ...


5

It ABSOLUTELY can. It's called overspray. Take one look at a bad paint job and you'll know it's a real thing. While not a car, take a look at this image: Imagine how they do this. They put a stencil down and spray their spray can at the openings in the cardboard (or whatever the stencil was made out of). You'll notice there is yellow spray paint above/...


4

Clearcoat that is dull can be polished back to a nice shine in most cases. A polish of the correct grit and type is needed. This one works well for us, others are available. A "dual Action" polisher is the easiest tool to use. Polishing can be done by hand with much time and effort. A single action rotary buffer tool can be used but needs an experienced ...


4

It would be silly to skip claying if the paint surface is heavy with contaminants and go to the compounding/polishing step; it would be like using makeup to cover blackheads - the right thing to do is remove the contaminants and work off a clean surface. Compounding uses micro-abrasion to reduce the visibility of paint imperfections while polishing works by ...


4

You can buy a non yellowing clear coat for plastics that will keep it from yellowing. Video describing how to do it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEJbKLZ7RmM Non Yellowing Clear coat paint https://www.walmart.com/ip/Rust-Oleum-American-Accents-Ultra-Cover-2x-Gloss-Clear/37326872#about-item


3

Headlights will yellow over time, almost like it's their purpose in life to do so. Once they do, you can treat them (as you have) or replace them. You will be sanding them again, when they turn yellow again. The clear coat, sitting on top of the plastic, will be removed by your sanding. Maybe it means you will have to sand a little bit more of the plastic ...


3

The good news is the dealer is willing to fix it correctly. If they are having the body shop team work on it, then it will be dealt with by professionals who know what they are doing to repair the finish of the vehicle. To answer your question, there really isn't any way for us to know with what little detail you have provided. Most likely it is stuck to ...


3

Use a small paint brush and small 1-2 oz paint wells from your local hobby store (Instead of using spray paint in a small enclosed area... Like the example link I provided in the question): prep the surface sand the emblem carefully with 1000 grit (taking care not to scratch the steering wheel part) clean the surface of dust and oils --> use either soap ...


3

You haven't provided the most accurate description of the paint, but I'm guessing you have what is known as Orange Peel. The orange peel effect is caused by premature evaporation of thinner, incorrect spray gun setup (ie. low air pressure or incorrect nozzle), spraying at an angle other than perpendicularly, or applying excessive paint. No matter ...


3

The straightforward answer is, the only way to regain lost clear coat through polishing is to re-spray it with more clear coat. There are a lot more factors with what you're asking, though. The several questions you should be asking when polishing a car are: Does my paint even have a clear coat? (Is the paint used a single, dual, or three stage paint?) ...


2

Pressure wash to remove loose clear coat, brush on clear urethane varnish to seal the edges and replace the clear. I have done this on the cap on my pickup, and where edges are coming loose on our Taurus.


2

If your not going to use clear coat it won't get a mirror shine since you only get that before you sand with epoxy I hear. However you can, I will explain how to do it. Once the paint surface is totally smooth and you have not created any deep scratches by anything under 1000 grit ( which is easy to do if you don't ramp up the grits). Never go under 1000 ...


2

Based on what Ben said (in a comment to my original question), I wet sanded it with 1500 grit, and then used a buffing/cutting compound (Meguiar's ultimate compound) and a LOT of elbow grease to buff it smooth. It still doesn't quite have the gloss of the original paint job, but definitely an improvement from before. It's noticeably less matte, and ...


2

If you're at an amateur level with autobody and paint work, and you're trying to repaint your vehicle with automotive spray cans, this is the best advice I can give you: Wet sand the body until there is no more gloss. (look up sand paper grit guides online for each step) New paint doesn't stick to glossy surfaces as much as it would to dull surfaces. Wash ...


2

Take this with a grain of salt because I am nowhere near an expert on car color matching, but I'm not sure if that portion of your car will have a color code. That's more a kind of body moulding piece (door skirt? typically plastic) that would have been added on after the painting of the car. My suggestion would be to see if a local paint shop could match ...


2

Just clear coated my car's headlights after sanding them to clarity. I used wet sanding, cleaned it with rubbing alcohol, dry then sprayed, but cloudy is an understatement. Hoping this clears up by the am, but their was some humidity in the air and I am bummed now, thinking I will have to sand off that spray job. That's what happens when you rush through ...


2

All you need to do is polish it. All rattle can clear coat looks like this. I did the whole rear end of a car after repairing some rust. I did black with clear over it. The clear just didn't have a mirror finish. It was smooth, but had a slight orange peel. I just polished it and poof, it was perfect. You need to remove the headlight assembly (not hard)...


2

I think where you went wrong is in how you coated it. It's been awhile since I saw the ChrisFix video, but was thinking the way you should be doing this is by after cleaning the lense with IPA (after using the Meguiar's) ... and really, I'd probably use something like Prep-All here instead of IPA, because I don't think IPA will clean everything off like the ...


2

The primer should not go over existing clear coat. You should think of circles of increasing diameter for each layer : primer smallest, paint next and then clear...


2

There's many ways to protect your paintwork and keep it in good condition, and each has it's own set of advantages and disadvantages. Here's some of the more common approaches: Paint protection film The basic idea here is very simple - a layer of protective film is applied to the outside of the paintwork, acting as an extra layer of protection between ...


2

You'd have to lightly sand the clear coat so the new clear coat and adhere


1

Pros: your headlight lens will have an extra barrier of protection to protect the plastic against rocks, chips, cracks, and oxygen. It's cheaper to sand and coat a headlight than replace a headlight. $10 for a turtle wax headlight kit. $7 for a can of clear coat. Both of these products you can keep reusing for a lifetime. Cons: it will eventually wear out, ...


1

The easiest way to repaint the emblem is not to. These can be purchased very cheaply (cheaper than you'd pay for paint and materials) on eBay, Amazon and other similar websites.


1

Background Clear coat is used on paint as a clear protective layer to the paint. The clear coat is what gives the appearance of shine to the cars paint job. The clear coat is typically more robust than paint as it is what is intended by the manufacturer to be exposed to the elements. Issue The clear coat is separating from the paint leaving the paint ...


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