32

The most effective thing I've found for this is heat. Warm the sticker with a hair dryer. When it gets warmed to a certain point it will easily pull away without leaving residue. One word of caution though, when it comes off the glass completely it will try to stick itself to your hand. Hot plastic is not something you want on your hand, so wear gloves ...


31

tl;dr: How much did you pay for that shirt? How often do you wash it? Why would you bother? Shirts just get dirty anyway. Can't you get another shirt? Are there any benefits of washing the outside of my car? Do you live in an area without salt, birds, tree sap, pollution, abrasive sand or road tar? Do you also drive around with brake pads that don'...


24

On glass, heat would probably work well as mentioned, but I've worked at a car dealership for years, and always removed stickers and window paint with a simple straight razor blade and windex. The windex is really just for lubrication - spray a bunch around the sticker, and scrape it off using the razor blade at an angle. Any remaining residue can be ...


22

I clean the inside with washing-up liquid (like Fairy in the UK - a mild liquid used for handwashing plates, cutlery etc.), then Windolene (a glass cleaning product), and then finish up with Rain-X Anti-fog. That gives me a pristine surface that resists fogging, especially in the winter.


21

The reason many people wash their car every week is to keep it looking nice and from the good old days of bad paint and no rust protection. These days, paints are significantly better and stand up to some serious abuse, and the cars are much better rust proofed (galvanised etc...). The washing your shirt analogy is a little unfair as with a dirty shirt, ...


17

Gloves. Do not use latex gloves, they break easily. Use nitrile gloves instead, they are mechanically much more resistant. Even better: Use nitrile gloves under ordinary work gloves. The ordinary gloves will protect the nitrile gloves from mechanically influences, the nitrile keeps away the oil. Soap Use industrial hand wash paste. Perfect to remove oil ...


16

Crumpled newspaper is my go-to for making glass look flawless. It removes streaks that many towels will leave behind.


15

Standard automotive brake fluid (DOT 3,4 and 5.1) are made from polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG is soluble in water, methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile, benzene, and dichloromethane, and is insoluble in diethyl ether and hexane. A long way of saying it will clean up with soap and water. DOT 5 brake fluid is diorgano polysiloxane (Silicone). It is not soluble ...


15

Believe it or not, that is corrosion. You are correct in your assumption that the Valve Cover is certainly cast aluminum. Aluminum can be damaged by many de-greasers that are too aggressive. This happens due to a chemical reaction by the cleaner with aluminum parts. Steel or painted parts will not have this oxidation occur. Usually you can avoid this by ...


14

Using dish washing liquid on your auto paint will strip off any of the good "stuff" which is on there, such as waxes and or oils. This leaves it unprotected. If you use stuff specifically for washing your car, you'll leave the wax in place and it will last much longer between applications. This site says it pretty well: While the detergents in dish soap ...


13

I would definitely not intentionally put sodium hypchlorite bleach in my radiator. Vinegar is one thing, but the sodium hypochlorite will attack anything aluminum in your radiator, intake manifold, block, or head. It'll also attack (vigorously) any rubberized gaskets that're in contact with coolant. Even disregarding outright measurable damage, it'll release ...


12

Acetone and isopropyl rubbing alcohol (90% and higher) are very effective at dissolving glue without affecting glass. It will affect any other plastic layer on the window so you should check for any anti-UV screen or other. I suggest a combination of Steve Matthews' answer (remove the plastic with heat) and afterwards get the eventual glue residue off with ...


11

MAJOR UPDATE - TOYOTA WARRANTY EXTENSION FOR "STICKY DASHBOARDS" Today ( 12/29/2014 ) I received in the mail a Warranty Enhancement Notification regarding my Toyota. Complete coincidence that I received this a few weeks after I posted the original question. A relevant December 18th, 2014 article from a consumer investigator regarding this issue. ...


11

Great question. My preference is silicone spray, as you suggested. I'm pretty sure this one is the one I usually get for this kind of job. Apparently I'm not the only person who thinks this is a good idea, either: Home Repair Central says, The two best choices are a silicone spray or white lithium grease. My preference it the silicone spray. It is ...


10

If you don't like gloves, I recommend GOJO: GOJO contains pumice, which is ground up volcanic rock. It also contains a natural degreaser. When you combine the two, you have a cleaner that can remove grease and dirt from every part of your hand, including nails and cuticles. I recommend combining it with a nail brush:


9

Oil changes are a boring job! As Hasen says, a larger size oil catch pan is the only real solution. Before you start, try and estimate the direction of flow. If the drain plug is on the side of the sump (oil pan), the oil will begin to flow horizontally, curving down with gravity, and hit the ground around 9-12" out from the hole - assuming you're worknig ...


9

tl dr - To directly answer the question, SeaFoam is a pure petroleum product. If an alternative product is made up the same as Seafoam, then I'd think it would work just fine. If its makeup is not similar, you probably won't see the same results. Below is what you are looking for and a recipe for making your own substitute. I found this answer for a SeaFoam ...


9

Ahh.. The Horror of chewing gum on the carpet. The best way by far is to use ICE or any cooling substance like liquid nitrogen if you are a geek but mainly ICE. Fill a bag with ice cubes and rub over the gum till its like a semi-solid blob. Use a spatula or something similar like a spoon to scrape off the gum. You will for sure end up with a residue which ...


9

Yes, the liquid and vapors are harmful. Use plastic gloves and face-shield while handling the battery and cleanup. Open the doors and allow the car to air out a little vacate some of the fumes before cleaning up the acid. Liberally (Use a lot!) cover the spill with baking soda. This will neutralize and soak up the acid. This will take 30 minutes to an hour ...


8

I would not use that solution to clean my radiator. Remember that a radiator itself is primarily made of fairly thin aluminum. The bleach/vinegar could very easily damage the structure and weaken it. A washing machine is made of (in most cases) a steel drum coated with porcelain, or stainless steel, both of which are very sturdy and are made to last a long ...


8

You should be able to pull off hard-to-remove contaminants with a combination of clay bar and lubricant. Clay bar is very good at removing surface contamination. Step-by-step instructions are shown in this video: lubricate the windshield with clay lubricant (soapy water should work just as well) knead the clay into a flat roughly palm-sized square Apply ...


8

I use a garden weed sprayer, its less powerful than a high pressure washer yet can have its jet aimed in a small area. Additionally you can fill it with hot water which will help loosen the mud. Something like this Try a few applications of something like Muc-off too. Normally its best to try to remove the gunk as soon as you get home rather than wait ...


8

You will generally want to look for something that is a solvent, or is solvent-based. A good homebrew 'degreaser' would be using washing soda (sodium carbonate) diluted in water. You can make washing soda from baking soda by heating it (baking soda) up on a stove. There are plenty of videos and guides on how to safely to this. But in terms of effectivity, ...


8

My weapon of choice for such a job is something like WD-40's White Lithium Grease:


8

The easiest way I'm aware of is to change your brake material to ceramic. While there is still dust, it's about 90% less apparent than is metallic or organic friction compounds (in most cases). As far as getting any brake dust off of your rims which collects (no matter what the material), the easiest thing to do is not in the application, but rather in the ...


8

Any damage done to the car (likely, none) will have already been done. What you will have, however, is a car that will smell like theres a cigarette in the vent when the AC or heating is on. You'll have to dismantle the dashboard to get to it, unless you can see it. The easiest solution is to take it to a garage, and send the bill to your 'friend' who ...


7

If you have a real enviromental concern look for a hand cleaner that is citrus based.Wipe your hands on a disposable towel and throw it in the regular trash. Most of us just wash our hand and rinse it down the drain. The brake dust doesn't contain any grease or oils. It is a combination of metal particles,maybe some ceramic particles and binders that hold ...


7

Clean with soap and water, rinse clear, then dry with a microfiber cloth. The key is the microfiber cloth.


7

The problem with using dish soap on your car is that it tends to wash away any wax that might be on the surface. Wax not only makes the car shine - it also protects the paint to a degree. So, will it hurt anything? Not that I'm aware of, but if you wax your car or use any other protectants, it would be best to stick to an actual "car wash" liquid.


7

I would never do this for a regular wash. However, there is one time when you might want to use dish soap to wash the car: when you're getting ready to do a really good waxing. While the dish soap will remove all of the wax that you used to have on the car, it will also strip road grime, oils, bird crap and a lot of other nastiness. The surface that ...


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