31

tl;dr: How much did you pay for that shirt? How often do you wash it? Why would you bother? Shirts just get dirty anyway. Can't you get another shirt? Are there any benefits of washing the outside of my car? Do you live in an area without salt, birds, tree sap, pollution, abrasive sand or road tar? Do you also drive around with brake pads that don'...


21

The reason many people wash their car every week is to keep it looking nice and from the good old days of bad paint and no rust protection. These days, paints are significantly better and stand up to some serious abuse, and the cars are much better rust proofed (galvanised etc...). The washing your shirt analogy is a little unfair as with a dirty shirt, ...


10

According to Michelin, don't use petroleum based tire cleaning products The general belief system that all tire cleaners or dressing are bad seems to be founded in Urban Legend. Water soluable tire cleaners aren't listed by any manufacturers of tires to be detrimental to the rubber. Michelin clearly states on their website the following. Avoid the use ...


8

Probably not, but... There is no concrete evidence that tire shines do indeed effect the longevity of tires significantly. There have been reports of the possibility of petroleum based tire shines possibly effecting the longevity of tires, but there are no verified studies that prove this. Water-based shines, as you said, are totally non-destructive to ...


7

tl dr: It isn't necessary, but it improves the quality of the polish/wax job. "Claying" (otherwise known as using a clay bar or detailing clay), is a means by which to remove contaminates from the finish of your vehicle which washing alone will not remove. The clay bar creates a shearing action, which basically cuts the contaminates off of the clear coat, ...


7

If your climate is anything like where I'm based, the picture shown is a part that is dirty mainly due to fine dust. I would advise against using any sort of chemical product without removing that dust first. To remove the dust, in my experience, there is no decent substitute for the soapy water, toothbrush and elbow grease genre. The end result is usually ...


7

I work from home, so my car stays in the garage for long periods of time. It doesn't get much mud or salt spray, and after it's washed, it looks pretty fresh for a month or two. It's often 6-months to a year between washings, and it never really looks terribly dirty (If it does get really dirty, I will wash it). However, a couple of years back, when I ...


6

tl;dr: if you are new to cut and polishes, I would recommend starting with mild cleaner wax by hand. From looking at your pictures, you don't have major paint damage. More importantly, I don't think anything in those pictures is something that will polish out as such. My recommendation if you are super new to this is to start small and easy. Many vendors ...


5

The key to understanding the differences lies in how car detailing and paint restoration works. The key word here is aggression, referring to the "rate of cut" of the pad. Here are the pads rated from most aggressive to least aggressive based on the information provided by 3M. 1. Compounding pad Compounding refers to the process of "levelling" defects in ...


5

My view on cleaning engines is that they are probably designed to get wet. At least wet in reasonable ways – rain while the hood is open, splashes from puddles, water that makes it through the radiator and around the edges of the hood. If you pull apart the electrical connectors on most (i.e., the ones that I work on :-) cars you'll see that some care has ...


4

It would be silly to skip claying if the paint surface is heavy with contaminants and go to the compounding/polishing step; it would be like using makeup to cover blackheads - the right thing to do is remove the contaminants and work off a clean surface. Compounding uses micro-abrasion to reduce the visibility of paint imperfections while polishing works by ...


4

The different "cuts" are like the coarseness of sandpaper – they describe how deeply the material scratches the surface. The more "aggressive" cuts remove material at a faster rate – this means that you can be more productive, but also that you have to be on your toes to ensure that you don't remove too much. The larger scratches will also (probably) require ...


4

Apart from the obvious benefit that a clean car looks nicer, washing your car will also remove all sorts of stuff that, on the long run, will harm its exterior: Salt attracts moisture, which speeds up corrosion (which would not be much of an issue with a galvanized body and intact paint and clearcoat, but a 13 year-old car is likely to have some faults in ...


4

I wash my car before winter every year before it gets too cold. I give it a thorough detailing and then I apply 2 coats of hard wax to make sure I did a good job. This is my idea of giving the body some protection and it seems to work. After all it is a significant financial investment for most of us. You'll notice the water not sticking to the paint ...


4

This is most likely wear on the paint due to opening the door. You have something in your hand and it hangs down. You unlatch the door via the handle and whatever is in your hand bangs against the car paint onto the car door. If you pay attention to what you do, you'll discover you and your passengers do this more often than you ever figured you would. If ...


4

You can buy a non yellowing clear coat for plastics that will keep it from yellowing. Video describing how to do it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEJbKLZ7RmM Non Yellowing Clear coat paint https://www.walmart.com/ip/Rust-Oleum-American-Accents-Ultra-Cover-2x-Gloss-Clear/37326872#about-item


3

Headlights will yellow over time, almost like it's their purpose in life to do so. Once they do, you can treat them (as you have) or replace them. You will be sanding them again, when they turn yellow again. The clear coat, sitting on top of the plastic, will be removed by your sanding. Maybe it means you will have to sand a little bit more of the plastic ...


3

I would not put it into an industrial washer. Not only would it deform it, it would probably ruin it ... not even counting the amount of prep time it would take to undertake the effort. Personally I think I'd hit it with some good cleaner and a bristle scrub brush, using something like Ragg Topp Fabric Convertible top Care Kit. You're looking to do two ...


3

I've used both clay bar and clay mitt (similar to the product you've posted). Advantages of clay mitt: if dropped, you can clean it off and use it rather than throw it away typically covers larger surface area in a single pass, allowing for quicker claying of the whole car Advantages of clay bar: you can continue to fold and expose new surface to ...


3

I assume that if you ask "Are there any benefits of washing the outside of my car?" you are not referring to the obvious cosmetic benefits. So I assume that the overall question is essentially summed up by the sub-question Does it damage my car if I don't wash it for a month or two? There is not much fact based evidence for an answer, with one exception:...


2

I have a 2004 Subaru Forester and have had it since it was about a year old. I can probably count the number of times I have washed it on one hand. They wash it when the oil gets changed at the shop but I don't drive much so that isn't very often either. It's pretty dry here but we get lots of snow in winter. They use gravel but not salt on the roads. I just ...


2

I went ahead and cleaned the engine, and so far (after a couple of hours driving around today), everything seems OK. Before applying degreaser and washing, I disconnected the negative battery terminal and wrapped the following parts in plastic grocery bags + duct tape: Battery Alternator (hard to get to without removing power steering / coolant reservoirs) ...


2

It appears that the mirror is placed over the "closer than appears" warning. This would indicate that it's an aftermarket item. Your idea of using dental floss is a good one. The adhesives on these aftermarket mirrors are a very thin foam double-sided tape. Your objective should be to slice the foam in two pieces edgewise. It can be done with small ...


2

I think where you went wrong is in how you coated it. It's been awhile since I saw the ChrisFix video, but was thinking the way you should be doing this is by after cleaning the lense with IPA (after using the Meguiar's) ... and really, I'd probably use something like Prep-All here instead of IPA, because I don't think IPA will clean everything off like the ...


2

Looks like someone left car wax on the plastic. There are some plastic restorer products out there that will polish it out. But since the detailer did it, have them make it right.


2

If you only do part of the vehicle, how do you know you've gotten the part which is actually contaminated? If you clay a car, you want to do the whole thing. Claying removes the surface contaminants which can further harm the finish on your vehicle when you are washing it. The contaminants act to the dull the appearance. If you are only going to do part of ...


1

i think the hairdryer trick isn't a bad one. to remove residue adhesive, i have found "Goo Gone" very helpful. i'm not sure if there's a generic variant of the chemical, but i was going to recommend that once you get the adhesive backing-residue off. i have had much success in removing super-stubborn adhesive residue on surfaces like this.


1

Pros: your headlight lens will have an extra barrier of protection to protect the plastic against rocks, chips, cracks, and oxygen. It's cheaper to sand and coat a headlight than replace a headlight. $10 for a turtle wax headlight kit. $7 for a can of clear coat. Both of these products you can keep reusing for a lifetime. Cons: it will eventually wear out, ...


1

Before. Given that you want the bolts, gaskets, etc. to not be painted, the best time to do it is right out of the machine shop. It will never be this easy to access every part of the engine again. Painting the ancillaries is easier when you can easily move them around to get a good angle on whichever part you are spraying. Also, you can paint them on ...


1

I use this easily applied Silicone Lubricant for rubber parts both inside and outside the hood. I also squirt it down the slit for the windows to keep my electric windows running smooth. It keeps all rubber lubricated, less prone to craks and shiny.


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