16

Sandblasting your frame is fine. Sandblasting your body or any panel can be debated until the pigs fly home. People have been doing it for decades, and get by. However, when you sandblast your body/panels, you run the risk of creating more metal/bodywork for you to do in your restoration. This is because the heat from the sandblaster can warp the panels. ...


13

I'd be asking if the car was put on a chassis rig when it was repaired. If it's even had just one day on a rig, it was clearly enough of an impact that made the assessor/repairer think it might be a write-off. If it wasn't put on a chassis rig, the next thing to look at are signs of welding along the forward chassis, particularly radiator support and crash ...


12

The following repair is cheap, easy and should last for 3 to 5 or more years depending on your climate, but it's not the "correct way" either. Remove the rust, paint and body protection around the hole with a wire brush wheel. Extend the area until you have clean, non-rusted metal all around the hole. Cut some glass fiber pads that cover the hole and all of ...


10

Sand blasting is perfectly safe for the metal, especially considering the heavier panels used in classic cars. However, it's less safe for the person doing the sandblasting, due to the higher levels of lead paint and bodywork used in old cars. Pure lead was often used to fill dents and body seams in older cars, and you can imagine what breathing a cloud of ...


9

You said "the dealer tells me that the car was likely rebuilt." The dealer should know for a fact that the car was rebuilt and issued a salvaged title, if not, walk away. On top of that, if the seller is slow, hesitant, or unwilling to comply with any of your requests for information about, or access to the vehicle, walk away. The most common damage in deer ...


8

According to the Material Safety Data Sheet the hazardous ingredient is listed as Styrene. I would recommend you wear a respirator and some good gloves. Some import points from the MSDS: Signs of Overexposure: Nausea, cough, dizziness, weakness, headache, chest pain, lack of coordination, shortness of breath, dermatitis, redness and/or pain in eyes. ...


8

That's the B-Pillar, the one at the front that the windshield is attached too is the A-Pillar, the one at the back after the rear door is the C-Pillar, if there was one behind that like in a station wagon or SUV it would be the D-Pillar and so on. More info here


8

Bodywork is something that cannot be rushed. While others are suggesting chemicals that may be suited for this application, it is not necessarily going to be a solution to your problem. The most important part of bodywork/painting is preparation and cleanliness. I cannot stress this enough. When applying bondo, fibreglass, spot putty, primer, paint, ...


8

I would use epoxy primer to start. You can then spray paintable undercoat on your frame, underbody. They come in various forms as depicted in the image below. You may also use a rocker guard type product as shown. To my personal taste, I would seal with epoxy primer, rubberized undercoat, and then oil undercoating to protect even further. Application is ...


8

A useful technique with MIG on thin metal is to create the weld by a series of overlapping tacks rather than a continuous run ie strike the arc, create a puddle then release the trigger and repeat, starting the next tack on the edge of the previous one. Here you want to use a bit more current than the minimum to ensure decent penetration, the pause between ...


8

I have no idea if this is legal where you live, or what tools or supplies you have, but this is what I would do to repair a junker/beater. I have used this for quick farm fixes without welding. You will need; a piece of sheet metal a few inches larger than the rusted area drill and bits pop rivet gun and rivets some kind of sealant Now the fix; Clean the ...


7

tl;dr: You will almost certainly notice no effect at all other than the loss of fuel economy due to the increased weight. It is very unlikely that a splitter or diffuser will have any measurable benefit unless you are driving a car that is: Very low to the ground over a ... Very smooth surface at a ... Very high speed. Needless to say, the street is not a ...


7

I believe this is the part you need to worry about: It is the rear bumper support and can be found under the bumper cover. As far as how imperative it is to fix, it all depends on the amount of damage which was done. You really need to take the bumper cover off to get a good look at the damage to this piece. You could probably get away with not replacing ...


7

If the repair work looks shoddy, take it back to them and get it fixed. There are two very important reasons why they will get it fixed to your satisfaction: Since this is an insurance referral, they will want to have it fixed to your satisfaction. The reason being, insurance referrals are easy money and the service comes to them, rather than having to ...


6

I recommend looking for a replacement side panel. Otherwise the standard panel beating approach is to try and hammer out the worst of the dents first. Car bog/filler/bondo is a last step to fill minor imperfections. This is harder than it sounds. Panels that have been creased or stretched seldom pop back to thier original position. Judging by your photo the ...


6

Think of dent-pulling like sculpting. Examine the area you need to work on. The wide creased pads will create a pinched like pull, while others will create rounder or more narrow pulls. 1. How do I choose the right shape, size and texture? Study the surface around the dent. Make sure you understand the panels geometry. For body lines you will want to use ...


6

Must be a location based thing, but in the UK sand hasn't been used for many years due to the very real dangers of inhaling even small amounts of silica from the bashed up sand. Although folks still call it 'sandblasting', in reality it's 'media blasting' and the media varies from tiny plastic or glass beads to ground up walnut shells (believe it or not!). ...


6

You could speak to a bodyshop, get the price for a repair and attempt to haggle that off the price. However, you could approach it a different way. If the damage has been done to the vehicle, it says something about the previous owner. If the repair has been poorly executed it says something else about the previous owner. My angle would be "Look, I have ...


5

It is a big job but I can't tell you how many hours it will take. The body shop looks up the cost in a estimating guide, and generates and estimate based on that. The differnce in shops is going to be in the parts used, dealer vs aftermarket, amount of parts mark up, the paint system used, and the labor rate the shop charges. Just know how long it should ...


5

I would believe most body shops will do the work with you bringing them the parts. I recently had to replace the bumper on my Mo-n-Law's car. I bought one online, took it to the body shop, they painted it, and I brought it home and installed it. They charged me a set price for getting it painted. There was no issue with them doing this. Since you said the ...


5

There is a certification program called the Certified Automotive Parts Association or CAPA. It not only covers body parts, but other parts as well. If you purchase a part which is CAPA Certified, you can be assured the parts will have the same fit and finish as original equipment manufacture (OEM) parts. This is from the CAPA website: The Certified ...


5

tl;dr: It depends on the ding. Try some cleaner wax, though: it won't make the problem worse. Did you scratch down to the primer or just leave some paint behind? If all you did was trade some paint between cars, you're going to need to polish it off. That said, if you're not comfortable with power polishing tools or abrasive polishes, I would counsel a ...


5

The right side looks like it has a small crease. You may be able to get it to look better but I don't think it will be perfect without some filling and painting. You can try covering the filler opening with some heavyduty plastic and installing the gascap. Hook the fuel outlet up to an air compressor. Gradually increase the pressure to see if the dent will ...


5

Yes, sand blasting is safe if you're safe Safety is variable. What is safe? Almost anything can be safe. Exploding bombs can be safe, it just depends on the process you implement for your safety and the safety of others. Is sand blasting safe? Not if you sand blast with dioxin laced sand, but even then, you can wear a pressure suit and possibly make ...


5

The likely cause is that the paint was applied too thin per coat or the nozzle was too far away. A coat thick enough to get a glossy sheen is seen but not too thick that runs develop is the proper technique. Practice on a similar surface is suggested. To fix it, sand the surface back to smooth with 600 grit sandpaper and then re-spray with three coats about ...


5

@IHNIWID .. Yes, the "color" coat(s) need to be wet-sanded aka "color sanded". And then thoroughly cleaned of sanding dust. This needs to be perfectly smooth before clear, even if it appears dull. The quality of a mirror, for instance, is not as dependent on the glass as much as the overall flatness of the silvering reflective coating or layer. I'm not a ...


5

Sounds like you have the right idea, at least for a temporary repair. You'll have to remove the entire bumber assembly to do this right, and you'll need to go slow as to not break the platic clips and geegaws that hold the whole thing together like a jigsaw puzzle. Because of the special poyurethane type polymers that are used in these bumpers, one ...


5

You can fix that by removing the remaining rusted metal, and welding some new steel there. There's really no other way if you live in an area with mandatory yearly car inspections. Try to patch the hole using a simpler way, and you soon find yourself with a failed mandatory inspection. Welding isn't expensive. If you don't have the required skills, you can ...


5

It ABSOLUTELY can. It's called overspray. Take one look at a bad paint job and you'll know it's a real thing. While not a car, take a look at this image: Imagine how they do this. They put a stencil down and spray their spray can at the openings in the cardboard (or whatever the stencil was made out of). You'll notice there is yellow spray paint above/...


4

There are a few ways to resolve this dent issue. Method 1 glue these plastic ding tabs to the gas tank. You can find them by googling "plastic ding tab" You will use a hot glue gun and hot glue them to your gas tank. Use a dent puller slide hammer. The tip should screw into the plastic ding pullers. Pull the weight of the slide hammer to the bottom ...


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