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16

Between the engine and transmission assembly (or part of the transmission assembly) there is a set of gears called the differential. Its purpose is to enable the outside wheel faster rotation when performing a turn. With both wheels off the ground, turning one of them forward will cause the other to rotate in the reverse direction. Safely block the rear ...


5

The short, easy answer: heat. That energy is being converted to heat in the driveline components for various reasons. It's important to note that these numbers are aggregates, however, and a really high end well engineered AWD or RWD system could outperform a cheaply manufactured FWD system. Differential losses tend to be considerably larger, especially ...


4

Your premise is wrong. The main reasons FWD cars are more commonplace today are: easier assembly: the entire drivetrain goes into the chassis as one complete assembly. unibody construction: FWD cars don't need a transmission and driveshaft tunnel under the car, making the unibody construction optimized for its own sake.


4

There is no fundamental reason for RWD to be less fuel efficient than FWD. There are many advantages to FWD, fuel efficiency is not a driver. Most rear drive cars these days are sport(y) , performance , luxury, or SUV's that are not optimized for maximal fuel efficiency. That is the reason you will typically see lower economy numbers. AWD is another matter ...


3

It's difficult to reach a conclusive answer, but you're on the right track with the extra mass of a RWD transmission - the propeller shaft taking power to the rear wheels adds some considerable weight. The gearbox is also traditionally attached directly behind the engine, and this means it impinges on the passenger compartment. A tunnel has to be constructed ...


3

Typically part time 4WD is not the same as AWD. Part time 4WD will actually lock the front and rear axles together, not providing a differential between them to handle the speed differences between front and rear wheels while turning. As such driving a part time 4WD in 4WD on pavement is a great way to break things. Auto is intended to give you 4WD when it's ...


2

Given your description I think that you have a serious issue with the flywheel / clutch assembly. "Banging noise and no gears" so no connection from the engine to drive wheels... Then when you try to start it, all you hear is a humming noise : this could just be the sound of the starter motor spinning. So, you need to get a good mechanic (friend / ...


2

Possibly. It depends on what is wrong with it and how the AWD is setup in the vehicle. About the only way this could work is if a rear drive line had gone out (like u-joints) and it was removed. The rear differential would free spin and the front wheels would provide the drive power. Overall, as compared to the rest of the system, the driveline is a ...


2

If they are matched brand across the axle you'll be fine for the sort of driving you describe - assuming the new rears are of comparable quality to the fronts. If you put ditchfinders on the rear you might find it a bit unpleasant in the wet! Regarding sizes - the OP mused in the comments about putting 225/50/R16 on the rear with 205/50/R16 on the front. ...


1

This depends on the system. One with a centre differential can drive the front, or rear, only but must have the centre differential locked otherwise it will just spin... Vehicles that did not have a centre dif only need to be locked into 4wd and driven. Done both of the above as have broken rear halfshafts and got home doing exactly as described.


1

If it is winter and you have summer on the back and winter on the front then you will definitely notice. Summer all round and not four wheel drive will be ok. If it was 4 wheel drive then keeping the tires matched is important depending on the 4wd drive system - and Volvo is one known for that.


1

It's doubtful. Almost all FWD cars have some amount of torque steer, unless they have equal-length CV/halfshafts - which is very difficult to package in an inexpensive car. Even in extreme cases (flooring the accelerator from a standstill on a Cadillac Northstar V8 for instance) the vehicle is designed to deal with those forces and still be reliable. Your ...


1

When comparing FWD to RWD, they each have their separate advantages: RWD is better off the line (as you've testified to), and FWD is better while maneuvering in and out of places with horrible traction (like parking in or leaving a snowdrift). But if AWD is an option, it does provide the best traction, albeit at the cost of some fuel economy and added wear ...


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