Hot answers tagged

21

It absolutely does. It's called riding the clutch. Even though you "believe" you just have your foot there, it forces the pedal down and takes up the slack which is there. This causes the throw out bearing to ride against the clutch fingers, which presses so ever slightly and causes the clutch to not have as much grip. This causes the clutch friction disk to ...


17

The ECON button is not a placebo, though the wording from that specific web page is a bit vague. The key is that the ECON button and the Eco-Assist system are two separate things. According to Honda, pressing the ECON button configures your car to improve mileage at the cost of performance. Turning it off will improve power and reduce mileage, which you ...


15

Obviously I'd recommend taking your car to the track and avoiding this kind of behavior on public roads. With that said, as long as you're not doing it for prolonged intervals, and you're only doing it on wet pavement, there won't be too much abnormal wear caused by occasionally hanging your tail out. Reagrdless, I would recommend attending a local autox or ...


13

Putting the transmission into "Park" engages the "parking pawl" - essentially a metal pin that locks the output shaft of transmission (and thus the driven wheels) in place. As to why it exists - it is intended as additional roll-away protection that complements (rather than replaces) the handbrake (which, as the name implies applies actual brakes - usually ...


11

It is straightforward to do this without any wear to your synchromesh, but it takes a lot of practice, especially when downshifting as you need to match revs accurately. Learning to heel and toe correctly will help you a lot here! You should never need to race the engine, as you should be using the same rev range as you would normally driving the car!


11

The Click & Clack method: Sitting in the driver’s seat (left or right-hand drive vehicle): Driver’s side mirror Lean your head against the window, and set the driver’s side mirror so that you can just see the side of your car in the mirror. Passenger side mirror: Position your head, as best as possible to the middle of the car. Use your radio, or ...


11

Your car may have plastic guards underneath to stop water from spraying up on sensitive components, but everything under the hood is typically waterproof to some degree. That said, the only "damage" I have ever seen is the spray of water loosening or tearing off plastic guards that are not properly fastened or half-way ripped off already. The basic short ...


10

DISCLAIMER: This is one of those questions where you are going to get a ton of opinion and speculation, and my reply will have some of that in it as well. I think there is a lot of myth out there about what cars actually need to maintain them as they are and should be. For instance, your comment about the M5 owner. The entire statement is about seat of the ...


9

My choice would depend on the duration of the stop. If you're rolling up to an intersection and see the light change to red knowing you will sit for a full cycle I'd opt for "in neutral foot off the clutch". Pulling up to an already red light I would go for "in gear clutch depressed" as you can figure you'll have a short wait. Having the clutch depressed ...


9

I had a buddy years ago who liked to do the same thing. Our big plans were cut short one evening when he hit a good sized puddle and managed to knock his muffler completely off. It was surely loose before, but it would have been nice to repair it some other time. It certainly won't help anything. If you splash pedestrians, you won't win any friends, ...


8

As a somewhat paranoid motorcyclist, I'm a huge fan of remaining in first, with the clutch disengaged until at least one vehicle has fully stopped behind me, after that if the remaining stop time is long (frequently it isn't) I may switch to neutral. Until that vehicle has completely stopped, you're at risk of being rear ended by someone failing to stop in ...


7

Go rent a car and practice. The only thing different is that you need to develop a feel for when the clutch is engaged sufficiently for you to give it gas. "Academically" speaking, you need to give a little bit of gas, let go of the clutch slowly until the car just starts to move, and then slightly increase the gas while releasing the clutch smoothly. Think ...


7

Winter tyres are absolutely necessary when the temperatures fall below 4 degrees Celsius, even if there is no snow on the road itself. Cold roads are slippery as well, even with tiny amount of humidity. Summer tyres have significantly worse traction in cold weather, and the car steers like a curling stone -- that is, not at all. Sharp corners and moderate to ...


7

In a perfect world from a physics textbook, you might be able to ask the question you have, and expect to compare time vs. engine speed, but there are many more factors in the real world. The speed-agnostic measure is Miles Per Gallon (or l/km). Speed doesn't appear in the name, because it doesn't matter. At higher speeds, things like wind resistance and ...


7

Drive by wire systems have no mechanical connection between the input decive (like a throttle/gas pedal) and the output device (like the engine). They use only electrical signals. To my knowledge there aren't any cars that use this system for steering. Your steering wheel is mechanically connected to the front wheels but is assisted by an electric motor. ...


7

fuel injected vehicles don't require a crazy amount of fuel to get started, in terms of fuel economy alone anything over 30 seconds should be safe (although we are talking about levels of fuel only eco-modders care about). If you are concerned about wear, there's no good way to tell which is better. If you change oil regularly I wouldn't worry about the wear ...


7

wear is increased at engine start When you have no oil pressure and you start the car, that is when the most wear occurs on your bearings. Crank bearings in most cars are not roller bearings anymore. They are called plain bearings and rely on hydro-dynamic lubrication. Here is answer related to crank bearings with illustrations so you can understand ...


6

Guidance from the Institute of Advanced Motorists in the UK is to place the car into neutral and use the parking brake. The wear on the clutch from keeping the clutch pedal in isn't likely to be an issue(*), but in the event of the car behind bumping you your foot could slip off the clutch, propelling you into the car in front! From an ecological ...


6

There is no 'per-country' recommended driving speed for fuel efficiency. It depends on the shape of your car, your engine size and type, the type of fuel you use, the quality of the roads etc. In my car for example, in top gear I can get 37 mpg at 60mph and it has a gentle drop up to about 75mph, but the efficiency drops off rapidly over 75mph (35mpg at 75 ...


6

Install snow tires. If it's 4-wheel drive or front wheel drive, install on all four wheels; if rear-wheel drive, just the driving wheels, although all four would be best. You might get away with summer tires + chains, but they have to be propely fitted and legal for where you intend to use them (check local regulations). If temperatures are no more than a ...


6

I posted a piece on Being Prepared in the snow on my personal blog a couple of years back. I didn't think of the Carbon Monoxide problem @mac mentioned, but there are some useful snippets there: With this winter in Scotland already a repeat of the freezing conditions of last year we are still astonished at how many people leave themselves at risk by being ...


6

The recommendations given on the travel site hit most of the high points. As someone who grew up in snowy Western New York and had the opportunity to drive all manner of vehicles in the snow, I can say without a doubt that the single best preparation to the vehicle is to fit good snow tires. Secondly, decrease your speed in snowy/freezing/wet conditions, ...


6

This wont do any damage to your engine until you have an accident making a mistake with the pedals:) The IAC would only doing the same function that you are doing manually. I do think you have more of a problem than the IAC being faulty, since it should just add extra air when you switch things on like the lights, air con etc. Maybe your throttle ...


6

In a manual tranmission car, the clutch is 'meshed' only when both sides of the clutch - the engine side and the wheel side - are running at the same speed. Downshifting Example I'll make up some numbers for an example: Say you're at 3rd gear, going 45 miles an hour and the engine is at 2.5k RPM. If you downshift while still going 45 miles an hour, the ...


6

Although I am unsure of the material that is being used for the roadway in your photos it appears similar to Topmix Permeable concrete You asked Can anyone explain how new pavements achieve this remarkable performance at eliminating splashing? Response Topmix Permeable concrete is simply a very porous concrete interlaced with large rounded pebbles. In ...


6

Several things to consider: Cable wear. The emergency break is generally activated by a steel cable. As the cable gets older, rusts, and wears, it can eventually totally break instead of braking. :) This shouldn't be an issue on a 3 years old car, but if your vehicle has reached 10-15 years old, you should definitely not depend on the cable to stop you. ...


6

You've exposed a combination of two things: high torque at low engine RPMs + high mechanical advantage => forward motion without requiring additional throttle (where "high" is defined to be "high enough to move the car"). There's another way to investigate the same problem that is likely easier on your clutch. First, get moving in low gear at a low but ...


5

As asked, the question is highly subjective, and Paulster2 provides sound reasoning that makes it amply clear why. In an effort to remain objective, I will stick with the example of the BMW M5 (which I own). The source of the Italian tune-up myth pertaining to the E39 M5 is easily explained. Every car has its quirks and design flaws and the M5 is no ...


5

Having driven a bus with a non-synchro gearbox and a wet clutch, I understand the meaning behind "stuck in neutral" - for if you didn't slide it into first before coming to a halt, there was no getting it into first without suffering the embarrassment of shutting down the engine. The habit dies hard; synchro or not, I still hold at a light in first gear, ...


5

There is a very simple answer. The friction co-efficient on the paint lines is lower than the pavement. It's pretty common on almost any paint line in any state within the Union. That being said, some road racing governing bodies like the FIM and FIA force circuits to use a particular type of paint with grit in it that has a higher friction co-efficient ...


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