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30

Use 2wd unless conditions need 4wd. Check the user manual as that will probably say the same. Driving the extra drivetrain is wasteful on fuel, which is why many (often older) 4wd have autolock hubs either original spec or aftermarket. Just to be clear, there are hub locks which can be auto or manual and are fitted at the wheel end of the front axle, which ...


15

Don't use "Lock (4WD)" mode unless on soft terrain. You will get increased wear of tyres and transmission, worse directional stability and higher fuel consumption for nothing in return. There is an automatic function that disables "lock" at high speeds, but it is only a safety measure and not a replacement for a reasonable driver choice. ...


14

i do 2WD inside the city roads + 4WD when i am out side the city, i do not do off roading You'll get better performance and efficiency in 2WD mode, especially on faster roads outside the city. You should leave it in 2WD unless there is ice or snow on the road. If you live in a country where roads outside the city are mostly slow bumpy gravel or loose-dirt ...


8

I will offer a counter-point to all of the current answers which indicate using 2WD "except when you need 4WD". In general, I will agree that 4WD isn't necessary and the 2WD (front wheels driven) mode is sufficient, as is attested by the fact that the majority of vehicles built today are front-wheel drive. However, "when you need" 4WD ...


8

The Renault/Dacia Duster uses the same 4x4 system as Nissan The Duster is offered with two-wheel drive or four-wheel-drive. The 4x4 variants make use of Nissan's all-wheel drive system,[10] which allows the driver to choose from three different driving modes: Auto, in which the rear-wheel drive is engaged automatically in case the front wheels lose grip, ...


3

Typically part time 4WD is not the same as AWD. Part time 4WD will actually lock the front and rear axles together, not providing a differential between them to handle the speed differences between front and rear wheels while turning. As such driving a part time 4WD in 4WD on pavement is a great way to break things. Auto is intended to give you 4WD when it's ...


2

A car with the possbility of 4WD next to 2WD will certainly be heavier, resulting in higher taxes, higher fuel consumption etc. 4WD itself is also more fuel consuming. On the other hand, you'll have better driveability, especially in bad weather or in the mountains, or when driving through mud/sand/grass etc. But it's also another thing in your car that can ...


2

Useful resource here on tire sizes: Tire Size Calculator But the smaller tires are only slightly narrower and less than 1" smaller radius. So I very much doubt that is the source of your vibration. The only real downside is that these will cause your speedo to read a bit high and your engine to turn a bit faster at the same actual speed. I'd have the ...


1

Those gears and all gears should be used once in awhile. My opinion is, if something isn’t used for a long period of time it or they can go to hell! Like gaskets or! On automatic transmissions the fluid is ran through the system better when you use the gears. Just like checking your automatic trans. You Change gears as the engine is running so the fluid will ...


1

Many people just don't get it... There are only two positions you should be using for the way you described your driving, 2WD and AUTO. 2WD will save gas mileage and wear and tear on the driveline. Auto sets the driveline into all wheel drive. This is meant for better control on road and for inclement weather, such as wet pavement and snow. Lock should never ...


1

In a traditional 4x4 vehicle like this 4wd will only benefit you in gaining traction on a loose surface. Use 4wd when youre stuck or there's wheel slip otherwise it just extra fuel youre using. Find a safe place to try it out. The low range gives you more torque which is helpful when climbing a steep grade or when the snow/mud/sand is thick enough that ...


1

2WD get better gas mileage 4WD handles better in slippery situations - heavy rain, snow If your someplace that regularly gets snow, go with the 4WD model. I believe the CRV has AWD, not 4WD.


1

As explained here, lots of people add aftermarket Z71 stickers to their truck to artificially increase the value. If the truck truly is a Z71, it would be listed on the RPO ("regular production options") sticker, which I believe is in the glove box for the Sierra. The real Z71 package had the following (copied from the link): Z71 Off-Road suspension 46mm ...


1

When comparing FWD to RWD, they each have their separate advantages: RWD is better off the line (as you've testified to), and FWD is better while maneuvering in and out of places with horrible traction (like parking in or leaving a snowdrift). But if AWD is an option, it does provide the best traction, albeit at the cost of some fuel economy and added wear ...


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