50

The main advantage to a lower flywheel mass on race cars is that the reduced mass allows the engine to rev more freely. The overall weight loss to the car is really not the key thing, it's letting the engine vary RPM really quickly. Being able to change RPM quickly can mean faster shifts, getting to a power band more quickly, etc, etc. It also makes the ...


28

cdunn's answer is spot on. To add a bit (especially for cars), in a race car you often want to be dropping from something like 7000 rpm to maybe 5500 rpm (or an even higher band, depending on the engine) in a split second to make an upshift. Especially at higher engine speed, that's a lot of energy to bleed (and goes as a function of the weight of the ...


16

A dual mass flywheel (or DMF) is a flywheel that is split into two halves (hence the name...), with a spring or springs between them to dampen out sudden changes in torque and rotation speed, and thus smoothen out vibrations in the drivetrain - making for a smoother drive, particularly in diesel engined vehicles, and the newer two and three cylinder engines ...


15

A flywheel serves four main purposes (in most vehicles): It provides mass for rotational inertia to keep the engine in motion It is specifically weighted to provide balance for the crankshaft It provides a means to get the engine started (starter ring) It provides a connection for power transfer between the engine and transmission (along with the clutch it ...


13

Physics dictates that rotational inertia impedes acceleration... which is why a lighter flywheel is considered to be a performance mod Less rotating mass = more acceleration, if all else is equal But rotational inertia helps an engine idle stably which explains why manufacturers don't go for lighter flywheels from the get-go If they opt for a lighter ...


11

The flywheel keeps your engine spinning The inertia of a flywheel is in direct proportion to the mass of the flywheel. Newton's first law of motion states, "An object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force" With that in mind, motorcycle engines ...


11

This is addition to Paulster's answer. Here's an animation The disc in Grey is the flywheel Wikipedia provides a good general outline - A flywheel is a rotating mechanical device that is used to store rotational energy. ... - Providing continuous energy when the energy source is discontinuous. For example, flywheels are used in reciprocating engines ...


11

The dual mass flywheel is typically misunderstood by a number of people. It's function is not to provide a smooth ride but is actually designed to protect the gearbox from destruction. My car, a run of the mill Volkswagen 1.9 TDI from twelve years ago, develops a staggering 250ftlb of torque. If this was fitted with a solid flywheel, this is more than ...


10

Adding to what Nick and Steve have said. Consider the millisecond-by-millisecond operation, and that the rated torque is an average over the engine cycle. In fact the engine is producing large spikes of torque during each cylinder's combustion event. Rather than transferring this into the gearbox the DMF averages the torque output, reducing the peak and ...


9

In general, a clutch is a part which allows to connect / disconnect two shafts also while they are rotating. The most simple clutch consists of two discs, each firmly attached to one shaft. Press them together, and the friction between them allows to transfer torque from the one shaft to the other. Pull them apart, and the shafts aren't connected any more, ...


9

One thing which hasn't been mentioned here about why a lightweight flywheel may not necessarily be a good thing for the street is, just like brakes, the rotational mass of a regular weight flywheel will allow for better heat control which is caused by engaging/disengaging the clutch during normal operation. The mass of a regular flywheel will be more ...


8

Well for one thing the mass of the flywheel is what it is because manufacturers have to strike a balance between performance and drive-ability and emissions figures. A lighter flywheel would require the car to idle at higher RPM's to keep from stalling because the inertia of the flywheel is what keeps the engine firing when you're not on the gas. So yes, it ...


5

The hardest part of a lightweight flywheel is getting used to taking off. Its like learning to drive a stick again. You need to rev it a bit more, or you will stall. There may be some 'Anti stall technology' you can use, especially with drive by wire. The shorter shift window pairs nicely with a short throw shifter. Again, takes a bit of getting used to....


5

A flywheel is used to even out impulse, and to store energy (these are both the same thing in reality) An engine, especially when running slowly (such as when starting) has relatively large impulses from each cylinder firing, but without a flywheel there is very little to keep the crankshaft turning once the sparkplug had fitted and expanded the mixture in ...


5

yes, that's correct. Now, rotating a flywheel at 2000 rpm is not a big deal: it's well within the capabilities of the material, as long as the flywheel is well-balanced. Other elements in the engine undergo much higher loads. The pistons, for instance, also go through a full stroke (up+down) 33 times per second at that engine speed, going from 0 to 100 km/...


4

A clutch works in exactly the same way as your brakes. The flywheel is just a big metal disk at the end of the crankshaft. Your clutch plate is a round piece of friction material (just like a brake disk) that is pressed hard onto the flywheel so it can transfer the power from the engine to the transmission (and from there to to wheels). When you press the ...


4

Chirp is in reference to the noise the drive tire makes when it slips a little bit when engaging the clutch from one gear to another.


3

The only noticeable clutch wear occurs when you're getting the car moving from a stop, where the weight and momentum of the engine is using the clutch to get the weight of the vehicle moving. When you shift, regardless of the RPM, the clutch only needs to spin the engine up or down to match the vehicle speed. Since the engine internals weigh almost nothing ...


3

To add a bit to Sweber's post. There are also multi-plate clutches that are you used in most motorcycles and very frequently in automobile racing like IRL and F1. A good video on multi-plate clutches.


3

I never use the tool, there's never enough room to get it in there. I use a screw driver/pry bar to turn the flywheel/flexplate by the teeth. You should be able to do that once you get the cover and or starter off. And yes you can turn the flywheel/flexplate by turning the crank bolt. That will work fine to move the flywheel/flexplate to get it started, but ...


3

RPM stands for ROTATIONS PER MINUTE. Converting to RPS (rotations per second) means you divide RPM by 60 (because there are 60 seconds in a minute) and you get RPS. So your question on 2000 RPM gives us: 2000/60 = 33.33333... rotations/second. Many modern engines go run much faster than 2000 RPM. Formula 1 engines run in excess of 20,000 RPM which is 333....


3

Generally with parts like this you will find only OEM parts and possible some high-performance units, which are likely more expensive than the OEM ones. Have you checked local junkyards or EBAY for a used one?


2

I was under the impression the purpose of the flywheel was to assist the starter pinion gear to start your motor: So every time you turn your vehicle the starter motor would rotate the gear which would rotate the engine.


2

Flywheel weight will not impact the power output of your engine. The mass of flywheel will change the rate of change of speed of the engine: A heavy flywheel will mean the engine is slow to speed up and slow down. This is good for smoothing out a rough engine. A light flywheel makes the engine more responsive and also less stable, it can change gears ...


2

More than likely you've just backed the PTO sprocket off of the drive shaft of the PTO itself. I'd suspect if you dismount the PTO (if you can easily) from the engine, you'll be able to see what you'd need to do to fix it. Bottom line, if things gave way easily, there shouldn't be any damage, but you may have to put things back together again. Like I said, ...


2

By what you describe its highly unlikely that the clutch is at fault here.. To me too it sounds like either the clutch master cylinder is sticking or the clutch pedal mechanism is at fault.. Or perhaps the clutch hydraulic system just needs bleeding. A repair to anything mentioned shouldn't be too expensive. The component you linked to could possibly also ...


2

A broken tooth or teeth on the flywheel will cause issues when engaging the starter. it will slip and possibly damage the starter. The easiest way to test the starter is to remove it and take it to the local auto parts store. If you think the teeth are bad, you should be able to use a screwdriver or a pick to pull the gear out and look at the teeth. an ...


2

If the starter is the correct one and is fitted correctly then it sounds as if there are flats on the ring gear, this is a circular gear that is fitted to the flywheel. If the noise is as bad as you describe you could try pulling the starter out and looking into the hole where it fits, if you rotate the engine (by hand) you should easily be able to spot the ...


2

The Internet wasn't helping me much on this one, so I came up with a trick: Put one of your pressure plate bolts into the flywheel (so the head is flush with the flywheel, but it doesn't need to be tight) Place a pry bar, pipe, or some other piece of metal between the bolt head and the ground. Turn the flywheel in the direction of engine rotation until it ...


2

Does that mean the flywheel (which is connected to the engine) rotates at 800 revolution per minute while in neutral? Yes. The flywheel is directly connected to the engine so it will rotate at exactly the same speed as the engine. If so, how come it is safe to fully release the clutch while in neutral? During normal running operation (going ...


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