52

It signifies that the car is running absolutely correct. Here is the reason why: A gasoline (petrol) molecule is made up as such: C8H18 (or 8 Carbon atoms and 18 Hydrogen atoms) Energy is obtained from the combustion of it by the conversion of a hydrocarbon to carbon dioxide and water. The combustion of octane follows this reaction: 2 C8H18 + 25 O2 → ...


50

The main advantage to a lower flywheel mass on race cars is that the reduced mass allows the engine to rev more freely. The overall weight loss to the car is really not the key thing, it's letting the engine vary RPM really quickly. Being able to change RPM quickly can mean faster shifts, getting to a power band more quickly, etc, etc. It also makes the ...


27

cdunn's answer is spot on. To add a bit (especially for cars), in a race car you often want to be dropping from something like 7000 rpm to maybe 5500 rpm (or an even higher band, depending on the engine) in a split second to make an upshift. Especially at higher engine speed, that's a lot of energy to bleed (and goes as a function of the weight of the ...


14

tl;dr: No. This sort of vehicle dynamics question best addressed by Racing Car Vehicle Dynamics What follows is a basic discussion at the high school physics level. As you will see from the reference text, high school physics is insufficient to statically model the complete vehicle system. A dynamic model is required to agree with easily obtainable ...


13

Physics dictates that rotational inertia impedes acceleration... which is why a lighter flywheel is considered to be a performance mod Less rotating mass = more acceleration, if all else is equal But rotational inertia helps an engine idle stably which explains why manufacturers don't go for lighter flywheels from the get-go If they opt for a lighter ...


12

Bob cross makes some good points, however, I would offer the following opinions: Winter tires don't have the dry grip that summer tires do. Your "high performance" handling will be limited with your winter tires on. Therefore, I wouldn't be too concerned about the incremental difference in handling due to the difference in unsprung weight between steel and ...


12

Torque is how strong your engine is and Horsepower is a measure of how fast it can use that power. That is why a Diesel engine with 400Nm of Torque cannot out-accellerate a petrol car with 400Nm of Torque. Horsepower is calculated by multiplying the amount of torque by the RPM of the engine (and dividing by 5,252. But that's not important here). Because a ...


12

A six pack usually refers to the Chrysler (Mopar) carburetor setup which is three-two barrel carbs on an intake. You'll most often hear of it as a 440 Six Pack, the 440 referring to the Big Block Mopar engine displacing 440 cubic inches. Here is an image of such a setup: The interesting thing about these is they are setup sequentially, where the main 2-...


11

The flywheel keeps your engine spinning The inertia of a flywheel is in direct proportion to the mass of the flywheel. Newton's first law of motion states, "An object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force" With that in mind, motorcycle engines ...


11

One of the reasons is loads of extra weight added by safety features and options. 8 airbags, 12 speaker stereo, 14 way adjustable seats, tons of insulation all around, power windows, power locks, 18 computers with hundreds of sensors, etc. Also consider the size/power output of the engine. It looks like your car had a 4 speed manual. Most cars today ...


10

Torque in a motorcycle The piston moves up and down, and the force for that comes from the fuel that is burned. Connected to the piston is a rod, the connecting rod, and that rod is connected (with the ability to turn) to the crankshaft. The distance between the pedal to the rotation point is comparable to the distance between the crank and the middle ...


10

A cam... in its most generic sense converts rotary motion into linear motion or vice versa using solid egg-shaped actuators (lobes)¹. An engine camshaft... refers to the shaft which houses a series of cams that actuate the opening/closing of the intake and exhaust valves on a four-stroke engine. A performance camshaft... is just a camshaft whose lobe ...


9

You have a lot of big questions here, so will try to answer them for you, but be ready for the diatribe of the century ;-) There is a simple rule when talking about power/torque output which goes: There is no replacement for displacement. If you increase the size of the four cylinder (through whatever method) to match the size of the six cylinder, you will ...


9

Every gallon of fuel your vehicle burns produces a gallon of water out of the exhaust. If the weather is cold you will see it as steam. If the rear of the exhaust system is still cold even in warm weather it will be for a short time after start-up, you will see the drips. On a hot engine/exhaust you will not see any drips from the tail-pipe. If there are ...


9

I pulled the following information from this site: Unless you are a professional motorcycle mechanic, you normally can not see whether a motorcycle has a wet or dry clutch just by looking at the bike. But if you know your Italian motorcycles, you probably have a pretty good idea which ones do. A wet clutch is called wet because it is actually wet ...


9

bit of a braindump... Hard to get more specific without more specific requirements... Is this a drag car, track car, street car, daily driver, etc. Basically this will lead you to - where do you need power and how much do you need. "Speed costs money, how fast do you want to go?" Just about everything is a balance of top end power vs bottom end power. ...


9

One thing which hasn't been mentioned here about why a lightweight flywheel may not necessarily be a good thing for the street is, just like brakes, the rotational mass of a regular weight flywheel will allow for better heat control which is caused by engaging/disengaging the clutch during normal operation. The mass of a regular flywheel will be more ...


9

There are trade offs, so no clear answer here. First of all, just to be anal and clear something up ... what you have is actually a 4-ring and a 5-ring piston. The oil control ring at the bottom actually consists of two rings and a spacer. The main trade off is, the 4-ring piston will have less drag on the cylinder walls, but the 5-ring piston will seal ...


8

Gasoline is made in large batches. Each batch has a number of attributes that should be met; Octane, specific chemistry, volatility, contaminates, ethanol content, and others. The output is dependent on the crude that went into the refinery and the processes the refiner has at hand to process it. Refineries vary in there capabilities. There are over 60 ...


8

NOTE: The following example assumes output in lb-ft & horsepower. Dynamometers can also measure torque output in Newton Meters or Kilowatts just as easily, or any other measure of torque and power, for that matter. First off, let's get everyone on the same sheet of music. When it comes to vehicles, there are two basic types of dynamometers: engine & ...


8

I'd say the only realistic option with a 1.3 liter turbodiesel besides an engine swap is chiptuning/remapping. And even then I'd research the potential of this engine, you'll be shortening it's life considerably. Many performance oriented modifications will work, but in my opinion are simply not worth the investment with this engine, as the gains will be ...


7

Is there a noticeable difference in handling due to the added weight of steel wheels? (seems to be 5-10 lbs more per wheel, ignore the salt and potholes for now) (scaling safety and performance) Yes. Assuming that your steel wheels are heavier than your alloy wheels (which might or might not be true), you'll be facing an increase in unsprung weight and ...


7

The short answer is no. The engine is most efficient at the RPM when maximum torque is achieved. It's easiest to explain with a picture. Power is a function of torque and RPM. Maximum torque is achieved because the engine is able to move the maximum amount of air and fuel in and out of the engine. The power continues to climb even when the torque starts ...


7

Generally, in the automotive world, there are two different types of dynamometer (or dyno for short) which might be used: chassis dyno; engine dyno. I'll discuss the general procedures for each type of dyno. Every dyno operator has their own procedure and will operate it how they see fit. You have to allow for this mainly because it's their dyno, they paid ...


7

Would there be a substantial enough of a horsepower boost to be noticeable? The most you could see from such a modification is 15hp. This would not be enough for the seat dyno to register, unless there are plenty of hemorrhoids to detect it. More then likely you'd see a measly 5-10hp, and then only at the higher RPM levels would this be apparent. You would ...


7

Forging is a process where hot metal of the rough shape is then very forcibly squished by exact shape dies, severely compressing the metal or alloy molecules. There are internal tensions created within the structure, which ultimately resist sheer and tension stresses by having a reserve of counterbalanced "forces" due to the myriad of tiny forge-created ...


6

Reading through some of the Ducati forums has lead me to believe the selection between an open and closed clutch cover on these bikes is mostly for aesthetics. There is some consideration for cooling, but nothing which is earth shattering. So here is a list of pros and cons which I have compiled on the subject: Open vs Closed Clutch Covers - PROS: ...


6

Engine Remap One way of increasing the power from your engine, depending on the car is to get your engine "remapped". This effectively means that your cars on-board computer (or ECU) has had its software changed and as a result the engine is told to produce more power. It should also be noted that changing the software used by the car can also be referred ...


6

Upstream the throttle body A dirty intake by itself isn't the problem, but it is a sign of contamination of related components: MAF sensors don't take kindly to dirt This will usually lead to the fouling of the hot-wire(s), resulting in the underreading of air mass flow, which will lead to positive fuel trim correction. If the contamination is bad enough,...


6

This question and answer from @BobCross is very illuminating and may help you in your decision making process. Have a look.


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