Hot answers tagged

12

You could do this, but you would not want to. By running current through the surface of the boat, you will induce a voltage potential across it. This voltage potential will cause current to flow from one part of the boat, through the water, to another part of the boat. This will cause electrolytic corrosion, which you definitely don't want.


11

Short answer .... NO !! Now this is one of those seriously contentious topics that people will chime in from all walks of life, experience, and voodoo. I will speak [yell] my piece, and put on my Nomex undies: Oil goes "bad" from two things: The long chains get broken down due to wear. But ask any tribologist with an ounce of morals, and they will ...


10

Water in the cylinder usually means water in the crankcase on a two stroke Pulling water out of the cylinder doesn't mean you pulled out all the water. Two stroke engines use ports on the side of the cylinder rather than valves at the top of a cylinder (4-Stroke). The ports run down the outside of the cylinder wall into the crankcase which means there is ...


8

So, bear with me on this and maybe I can help. Mind you, none of what I'm going to say is going to be easy to do, but that is because your issue is not an easy one to solve. The main problems I see here with any solution is alignment and distance from any mounting point I can discern. My main thought here is you need to get the alternator connected back to ...


7

I'm not a watercraft Mikuni guy, but I've dealt with a few two-stroke carbs that work in this manner. There's a few possibilities: The internal filter screen is clogged, but I'm discounting this as it's just rebuilt, and I doubt that would cause the primer bulb effect anyway. The fuel return is dirty or blocked. Verify with it running (after an ether ...


6

Water in the cylinder? The engine is in bad shape from improper storage. Even if you get it freed up there will be rust on the cylinder walls and piston rings, which will cause more damage if you manage to get it running or spinning over with the starter. The best solution is removal and complete disassembly and inspection of the engine. Make a decision to ...


5

Connect it to the engine block: A bolt on the engine end of one of the engine mounts, or one of the bolts that hold the starter, but not a hot spot like one of the exhaust manifold bolts. Anywhere on the engine block is pretty-much equivalent so connect it to the most convenient place.


5

Those are the remnants of gasoline When you let gasoline evaporate it leaves behind various elements within the gas that can't dissipate through evaporation. These remnants can clog various galley's in your carburetor as well as clog jets. Even if you are soaking your carburetor you will still want to physically clean out the jets and use compressed air ...


5

It's me, your future self. So it turns out that you're an idiot and all you had to do was fiddle with the choke. That little lever on the carb? That's the choke. I forget which way is open and which way is closed, but if you do the following: Push the ignition switch. If it doesn't start, move the choke lever to the other (closed) position. Push the ...


4

I would think you should be able to if there is a terminal for the wire to attach to. If the terminal has broke off at the base of the sensor, then it probably won't work. I would use a soldering iron, versus open flame type of iron to ensure the heat is more localized. If you are worried about the sensor not working due to the heat, I don't think I would ...


4

Do you know what each gauge is rated at for current carrying capacity? I would think a daisy chain is fine as long as the wire gauge is large enough. Don't neglect to use the same gauge of wire for both power(DC+) and ground. I'd look at the specs for each display gauge, add a bit of safety margin, then add the current up and calculate the wire gauge ...


4

You could do what you are suggesting, but to what end? It seems to me you'd have a much greater chance for something to go wrong. Here are a few things to think about: If you are running your trolling motor off of both, there is the distinct possibility you'll drain both batteries and then you'd be stranded. Keeping them independent will help ensure this ...


3

Use a voltmeter and trace the circuit for 12v from the battery to the starter, you will find where the voltage drops off. Also trace it to and from the starter switch/button to the starter relay, check all circuits involved.


3

Its bedding compound, there are many kinds on the market and which kind works best depends from the kind of hardware. Some are strong adhesives, consider them pretty much permanent, will work well on things that are put in place once and rarely or never removed, 3M 5200 is a polyurethane adhesive of this kind. Many hate it but it has its uses. It cures hard,...


3

The problem was resolved by changing the water pump casing and gaskets. The pump case was eroding away in flakes. Holes in the lower pump case and gaskets diverted part of the water flow into the lower unit (where the weeping holes are). Once enough water had filled up in the casing around the pump, the pump could prime. Only then could the water flow up ...


2

600W isn't much power. At 240V it means 2.5A compared to 16A (3840W) through your shore supply. So it depends on what exactly you expect to have plugged in and turned on. You may need to make a list and add up the power needs. Don't know Yes, a 13A plug and a 15A connector can safely carry a 2.5A current. Probably. Not sure about charging your 110Ah ...


2

At best, "persuading" the engine to turn over will result in damage when it is started (because of rusty bearings, etc.). You might not even get that far, and you'll damage a piston or twist the crank while trying to free it off. Dismantling a two-stroke engine is very simple. Then inspect everything. With luck, you can put it back together with new ...


2

First of all, a fuse is there to protect electrical parts from using or being exposed to too much amperage. When the circuit goes over this amperage, the fuse burns out. Since this happened to you, I'd suggest one of two things is going on. You have a short in that circuit. Since you stated you didn't see any chafing in the wires, this is not the problem. ...


2

Fuses have 3 different parameters; current rating, voltage rating and physical size. The physical size is self explanatory, it just has to fit. The current rating is also rather self explanatory. The fuse protects the circuit against high current. If the current rating is exceeded the fuse blows. A fuse should always be replaced with another fuse with ...


2

According to this site, it's a 1986 motor, and it's actually a 5C M. According to this other site, they were built by Yamaha for Mercury.


2

For an engine to start, you need three things - compression, fuel and spark. You've confirmed yo have compression, so we can rule that out. You've also confirmed that you've got fuel (you state in your edit that the plugs are wet, and you've tried starting fluid), and you believe that you have a spark, but it may be weak. This suggests to me one of the ...


2

More than likely you've just backed the PTO sprocket off of the drive shaft of the PTO itself. I'd suspect if you dismount the PTO (if you can easily) from the engine, you'll be able to see what you'd need to do to fix it. Bottom line, if things gave way easily, there shouldn't be any damage, but you may have to put things back together again. Like I said, ...


2

Flywheel weight will not impact the power output of your engine. The mass of flywheel will change the rate of change of speed of the engine: A heavy flywheel will mean the engine is slow to speed up and slow down. This is good for smoothing out a rough engine. A light flywheel makes the engine more responsive and also less stable, it can change gears ...


1

Go with low : keeps the speed down delivers the power smoothly and you are not in a rush. Had several landrovers one fitted with v8 and a rangerover LT77 gearbox - low gives you control without slipping the clutch.


1

That sounds like a battery cutoff switch - usually a red plastic t-shaped key about 2 inches across. There's various different sorts, but a bit of hunting on the web ought to find one that matches yours, and the keys are often available as spares...


1

It's sometimes called a kill switch lanyard. This is an Airhead Boat Kill Switch Keys with Lanyard. It has seven keys which will fit most any outboard. There are others as well.


1

There's also the slight possibility that there could've been some old bad gas or gunk in the tank that could've just gotten sucked into the lines or the carb jets. If that is possible in your case you can flush everything with started fluid or brake cleaner and make sure to remove the fuel tank and put about a half gallon of gas in it and shake it well and ...


1

After looking at the circuit diagram, I will try and clarify what wires should go where. The ignition/starter circuit (key and Start button) should not be connected in any way to the Stop button and Lanyard. Testing the Start circuit. With the key turned to the ON position, you should get ~12v on one side only of the start button (can't tell what colour ...


1

It's worth noting that there are actually five fuse parameters that are important to consider (and easy to get wrong when buying a replacement fuse): Current rating (the "size" of the fuse, the amount of current that it is intended to carry). Fuse characteristics – how fast the fuse will respond to an overload. Fast acting fuses are designed to blow quickly ...


1

That's what's known as a 'barrel fuse' or 'cartridge fuse' - You should be able to get them at any decent electrical supplier. The fuse will have blown because it was overloaded - and the most likely cause of this is a short circuit. Before replacing the fuse, try to identify the source of the short. The loose connection you mention is a good place to start,...


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