0

I changed the brake pads on a Hilux and after doing so, the pedal has gone very spongy. The brake fluid also seems to have risen above max. When I start the car, the first press of the brake pedal seems normal but after that it’s very spongy.

  • this is not uncommon after changing brake pads,it should get better after some use. – trond hansen Jan 26 at 7:03
  • Did you release the bleed nipples when you pushed the brake pistons in? – HandyHowie Jan 26 at 8:30
0

You need to bleed the brake lines, as it means there is an air bubble trapped in the line raising the fluid level.

| improve this answer | |
  • Welcome to M.SE, Frank. You need to proof-read before submitting your answer. Site policy is "Write to the best of your ability We don't expect every answer to be perfect, but answers with correct spelling, punctuation, and grammar are easier to read. They also tend to get upvoted more frequently. Remember, you can always go back at any time and edit your answer to improve it." See How to answer.. – Transistor Jan 26 at 11:38
0

If you did only change the brake pads and pushed the caliper pistons back the brake fluid level will go up.

You should not need to bleed the calipers after this,it is not unusual that the brake pedal feels a little spongy after changing brake pads but it should get back to normal in a short time after some driving.

If the pedal still feels spongy after a week of normal use of your car you need to have it looked at.

| improve this answer | |
0

Do a preliminary check of the hydraulics and vacuum booster by holding down the brake pedal and feel if there is continuous release of pressure. Pulse the brake pedal repeatedly and continue pulsing while your turn off the engine. The pedal should get harder and harder to push and eventually settle to a consistent pressure on your foot with no 'lag' and additional slow downward movement.

If the 'sponginess' is only when you are trying to stop the moving car you may have oil or contaminants on the rotors or may need to break in the pads.

Best to refresh the system by doing a hydraulic bleed if possible. As a stopgap measure keep a continuous check on the fluid reservoir and keep a periodic visual leak check on each caliper piston and hoses.

Again you may just have oil on the rotor.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.